2021 National Law Enforcement Memorial and Museum Commemorative Coin Designs Unveiled

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2021 National Law Enforcement Memorial and Museum Commemorative Coin Designs
Designs for the 2021 National Law Enforcement Memorial and Museum Commemorative Coins

Before 2020 ended, the United States Mint unveiled designs for the 2021 National Law Enforcement Memorial and Museum Commemorative Coins.

"These designs will be featured on coins that honor the extraordinary service and sacrifice of law enforcement officers throughout the history of the United States," said United States Mint Director Dave Ryder. "We hope this program will assist the Museum in its mission to bridge the past and the present and to increase public understanding and support for the law enforcement community."

Authorized under Public Law 116-94, the Further Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2020, the U.S. Mint will produce and sell up to 50,000 $5 gold coins, no more than 400,000 silver dollars, and a maximum of 750,000 half-dollars in collector qualities of proof and uncirculated.

$5 Gold Coin Designs

The gold dollars’ obverse (head side) design depicts male and female officers in profile saluting, with the inscriptions "LIBERTY," "2021," and "IN GOD WE TRUST."

2021 National Law Enforcement Memorial and Museum Commemorative $5 Gold Coin Designs
2021 National Law Enforcement Memorial and Museum Commemorative $5 Gold Coin Designs

Their reverse (tails side) shows a folded flag with three roses beneath symbolizing remembrance. Inscriptions are "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA," "FIVE DOLLARS," and "E PLURIBUS UNUM."

Obverse Artists Reverse Artists
Designer: Frank Morris Designer: Ron Sanders
Sculptor: Phebe Hemphill Sculptor: Craig Campbell

 

Silver Dollar Designs

Silver dollar obverses depict a police officer kneeling next to a child, who is reading a book and sitting on a basketball, symbolizing service to the community and future generations. Inscriptions are "SERVE & PROTECT," "LIBERTY," "2021," and "IN GOD WE TRUST."

2021 National Law Enforcement Memorial and Museum Commemorative Silver Dollar Designs
2021 National Law Enforcement Memorial and Museum Commemorative Silver Dollar Designs

Reverses show a handshake between a law enforcement officer and a member of the public, representing the work law enforcement officers do within their communities to increase safety through trusting relationships. Inscriptions are "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA," "E PLURIBUS UNUM," and "ONE DOLLAR."

Obverse Artists Reverse Artists
Designer: Frank Morris Designer: Ron Sanders
Sculptor: Phebe Hemphill Sculptor: John P. McGraw

 

Half Dollar Designs

Half dollar obverses depict a sheriff’s star, representing the community served by law enforcement officers and the important role they play. Inscriptions are "SERVE AND PROTECT," "LIBERTY," "2021," and "IN GOD WE TRUST."

2021 National Law Enforcement Memorial and Museum Commemorative Half Dollar Designs
2021 National Law Enforcement Memorial and Museum Commemorative Half Dollar Designs

Reverses depict an eye in a magnifying glass looking at a fingerprint, portraying the human side of justice, a reminder that law enforcement is not only officers on the street but also many others behind the scenes. It also features the emblem of the National Law Enforcement Museum. Inscriptions are "UNITED STATES of AMERICA," "E PLURIBUS UNUM," "HALF DOLLAR," and "NATIONAL LAW ENFORCEMENT MEMORIAL AND MUSEUM."

Obverse Artists Reverse Artists
Designer: Ron Sanders Designer: Heidi Wastweet
Sculptor: John P. McGraw Sculptor: Renata Gordon

 

Surcharges and 2020 Christa McAuliffe Commemorative Coin Program

Prices and an on-sale date for the commemorative coins have yet to be published.

The authorizing law calls for added surcharges of $35 per gold coin, $10 for each silver dollar, and $5 per clad half-dollar. Provided the coins turn a profit, the collected surcharges are to paid to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund Inc., for educational and outreach programs and exhibits.

Current law provides for two U.S. Mint commemorative coin programs each year. The other 2021 program includes silver dollars honoring Christa McAuliffe, the first participant in NASA’s Teach in Space Project (TISP) and one of the seven crew members killed in the Space Shuttle Challenger explosion on Jan. 28, 1986.

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Jim Longacre

I don’t see much there I want. I might buy the Morgan/Peace commems if they aren’t crazy expensive and filled with low mintage varieties. In scores of other games, Trump still hasn’t signed the coinage redesign bill that will lead to a new series of quarters, 250th anniversary pieces in 2026 and several other series. The bill was presented to him on January 1. He has until January 13 (ten days with Sundays not counting) to sign it. I think if he doesn’t, it’s pocket vetoed but I’m not certain. He may not be in the mood to sign bills,… Read more »

Last edited 6 days ago by Jim Longacre
Jim Longacre

Trump signed it yesterday: “H.R. 1923, the “Circulating Collectible Coin Redesign Act of 2020,” which requires Treasury to redesign and issue certain circulating coins to honor prominent American women, the United States Semiquincentennial, and youth sports and the U.S. Paralympics;”

ATS

Just an UGLY set of designs (other than the obverse design of the .50 clad). What is the Mint thinking? Maybe, just maybe, if they can come up with decent designs and fix their pricing they may hit mintage levels of the 1980’s and 90’s.

Kaiser Wilhelm

I completely agree. This entire set has an off-putting, oddly discordant appearance that in no way encourages any desire whatsoever to acquire even a part of it.

Chas. Barber

Hey Kids didn’t they just do one for the Police a few years ago. These are a great subject but overmade over done & weak designs. Will be a candidate for a low mintage wonder IMHO….. The mintage # are ridiculous 50k AU, why less than 10k of the WW2 & 1945 of V75. 400k silver dollars- 700k clad I think they’re CRAZY #s way, WAT TOO HIGH for this recycled commem idea

Jim Longacre

If they go low mintage, then it is low surcharge for the organization that benefits. And it’s Congress who decides, and who is to tell them to cut the maximum to a reasonable figure? It should be something like 10,000 gold, 100,000 silver and 200,000 clad.