2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Commemorative Coin Images

by Mike Unser on March 12, 2014 · 24 comments

New from the United States Mint are 24 images of the upcoming 2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Commemorative Coins.

Images of the 2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Commemorative Coins

Images of the clad, silver and gold 2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Commemorative Coins (Larger images of each are below)

Scheduled to launch on March 27, 2014, the coins mark a first for the U.S. Mint with their curved shapes. Before Tuesday, the Mint had published only line art images and renderings of the coins. Available now, and offered further below are actual images of the coins’ obverse and reverse as well as angled and profile views.

Celebrating the National Baseball Hall of Fame and its 75th anniversary, buyers will have six options to choose from since the commemorative coins are produced in $5 gold, $1 silver and 50c clad with each of those in collector qualities of proof and uncirculated.

Obverses are common to all the coins, featuring a baseball glove as designed by Cassie McFarland. Inscriptions include LIBERTY, IN GOD WE TRUST, and 2014. The glove design also highlights the concavity of the coin.

Each coin also has a common reverse depicting a baseball similar to those used in Major League Baseball, as designed by Don Everhart. Inscriptions include UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, E PLURIBUS UNUM and either FIVE DOLLARS, ONE DOLLAR or HALF DOLLAR. Reverses are convex in shape.

As the images show, each of the U.S. Mint production facilities have a part in striking the commemoratives. The proof and uncirculated $5 gold coins are from the West Point Mint, the proof and uncirculated silver dollars are from the Philadelphia Mint, the proof half-dollar is from the San Francisco Mint and the uncirculated half-dollar is from the Denver Mint.

Below are images and specifications of the commemorative coins as provided on the U.S. Mint’s website.

Images of the 2014-W Proof $5 Gold Coins

2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Proof $5 Gold Coin - Obverse

Proof $5 Gold Coin – Obverse

2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Proof $5 Gold Coin - Reverse

Proof $5 Gold Coin – Reverse

2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Proof $5 Gold Coin - Obverse, Angled

Proof $5 Gold Coin – Obverse, Angled

2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Proof $5 Gold Coin - Profile

Proof $5 Gold Coin – Profile

Images of the 2014-W Uncirculated $5 Gold Coins

2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Uncirculated $5 Gold Coin - Obverse

Uncirculated $5 Gold Coin – Obverse

2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Uncirculated $5 Gold Coin - Reverse

Uncirculated $5 Gold Coin – Reverse

2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Uncirculated $5 Gold Coin - Obverse, Angled

Uncirculated $5 Gold Coin – Obverse, Angled

2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Uncirculated $5 Gold Coin - Profile

Uncirculated $5 Gold Coin – Profile

$5 Gold Coin Specifications
Weight: 8.359 grams nominal
Composition: 90% gold, 10% alloy
Mintage Limit: 50,000 across all product options
Height of Dome: 0.085 inches

 

Images of the 2014-P Proof Silver Dollars

2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Proof Silver Dollar - Obverse

Proof Silver Dollar – Obverse

2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Proof Silver Dollar - Reverse

Proof Silver Dollar – Reverse

2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Proof Silver Dollar - Obverse, Angled

Proof Silver Dollar – Obverse, Angled

2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Proof Silver Dollar - Profile

Proof Silver Dollar – Profile

Images of the 2014-P Uncirculated Silver Dollars

2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Uncirculated Silver Dollar - Obverse

Uncirculated Silver Dollar – Obverse

2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Uncirculated Silver Dollar - Reverse

Uncirculated Silver Dollar – Reverse

2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Uncirculated Silver Dollar - Obverse, Angled

Uncirculated Silver Dollar – Obverse, Angled

2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Uncirculated Silver Dollar - Profile

Uncirculated Silver Dollar – Profile

Silver Dollar Coin Specifications
Weight: 26.73 grams nominal
Composition: 90% silver, 10% copper
Mintage Limit: 400,000 across all product options
Height of Dome: 0.150 inches

 

Images of the 2014-S Proof Clad Half Dollars

2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Proof Clad Half-Dollar - Obverse

Proof Clad Half-Dollar – Obverse

2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Proof Clad Half-Dollar - Reverse

Proof Clad Half-Dollar – Reverse

2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Proof Clad Half-Dollar - Obverse, Angled

Proof Clad Half-Dollar – Obverse, Angled

2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Proof Clad Half-Dollar - Profile

Proof Clad Half-Dollar – Profile

Images of the 2014-D Uncirculated Clad Half Dollars

2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Uncirculated Clad Half-Dollar - Obverse

Uncirculated Clad Half-Dollar – Obverse

2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Uncirculated Clad Half-Dollar - Reverse

Uncirculated Clad Half-Dollar – Reverse

2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Uncirculated Clad Half-Dollar - Obverse, Angled

Uncirculated Clad Half-Dollar – Obverse, Angled

2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Uncirculated Clad Half-Dollar - Profile

Uncirculated Clad Half-Dollar – Profile

Half-Dollar Clad Coin Specifications
Weight: 11.34 grams nominal
Composition: 92% copper, 8% nickel
Mintage Limit: 750,000 across all product options
Height of Dome: 0.058 inches

 

Release Information

Prices of the coins are yet to be announced. When released at 12:00 PM ET on March 27, orders may be placed from the U.S. Mint website at www.usmint.gov/catalog.

{ 24 comments… read them below or add one }

Boz March 12, 2014 at 9:38 am

So the 50 cent version is much less concave?

Mike Unser March 12, 2014 at 9:59 am

Boz, good observation. I meant to mention that in the article. The gold, silver and clad each have different dome heights — 0.150 inches (3.81 mm) for the $1 silver dollars, 0.085 inches (2.159 mm) for the $5 gold coins and 0.058 inches (1.4732 mm) for the 50c clad coins.

It was easiest for silver dollars to have a higher dome since they have a larger diameter and more metal to flow and fill into the designs during striking. The half-dollar was the most difficult. Size, compositions and die life all factored into the eventual heights for each type of coin.

Tom March 12, 2014 at 7:40 pm

I wish them all the luck. Two weeks from distribution date they should have published how much they will cost. Seeing how they haven’t I have decided not to buy any of these coins, it starting to smell of rip-off. Plus they are only 90% Gold/Silver.

JOE #2 March 12, 2014 at 9:13 pm

Tom, I couldn’t agree more. They could have made these .9999 gold, like the buffalo. I’m passing as well.

Bob March 13, 2014 at 10:17 am

I don’t care much about the composition, I just love baseball and think these are pretty neat.

I will definitely want to buy one of each.

Tom Heimer March 13, 2014 at 11:25 am

Where will be able to purchase the new 2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame coins when they become available? March 27th first day they can be purchased?

JOE #2 March 13, 2014 at 11:41 am

Tom, at the usmint.gov site

Alice M Villasenor March 14, 2014 at 2:38 pm

These are awesome please notify me asap I have 6grandsons & 1 daughter playing T-ball – baseball in high school

JOE #2 March 14, 2014 at 3:09 pm

Alice… On March 27th at about 11:58 am go to usmint.gov and order. Or call 1800usamint

Brian Wallace March 14, 2014 at 3:39 pm

Please email me when these are available. Thank you

Jason March 14, 2014 at 10:41 pm

So are these going to be circulated to the public or do we actually have to buy these??

Stacy Bernheisel March 15, 2014 at 2:45 am

Please notify ASAP of release !!! I’m huge baseball fan and love these regardless of actual value !!

Celia March 15, 2014 at 1:31 pm

I love Baseball and want to order when they r released please let me know

jerry workman March 15, 2014 at 4:48 pm

Looks great but 90/10 purity and cant find price no thanks for now.

Jeffrey March 15, 2014 at 8:38 pm

Just a little info for eveybody…all modern commemroative silver dollar compostions are 90/10. If the last few years are any indication, prices will be in the $50-$60 range for the silver dollars.

JOE #2 March 15, 2014 at 9:36 pm

Is anybody worried about carbon or copper spots on the gold one down the road? Because 10% is mixed with part silver and the rest copper. I wish the gold one was .9999. Just food for thought.

Kahoola March 16, 2014 at 11:38 pm

Have had “rose spots” several times on the .999 first spouse half oz. gold coins. Don’t know that adding another 9 would keep that from happening. You have to look at the coins, do not recommend keeping in the box for “first strike” eligibility.

JOE #2 March 17, 2014 at 1:11 pm

For collectors, In my opinion, Having these graded is ridiculous.It should stay in the o.g.p. unless you plan on selling them or flipping. ( Don’t know after awhile you’ll make a great deal of money flipping these. ) To me, It is more secure ( maybe in my mind ) that gold should be as pure gold as possible. .9999 works for me. I’m not wild about 90% especially for the price. The silver ones should have been .999 as well, Not 90%.. Just my 2 cents…. :) When they mint these the machines and cooling process have to be 100% clean with no traces on ANYTHING that can “work” on the coin later on in time ( mixing ) with other foreign objects. For collectors who bought the Canadian wildlife series know what i’m talking about. the “good ol ” milk spots..

NJMANGA March 17, 2014 at 5:32 pm

I wish the US MINT was like the Canadian mint, perth mint and so on. I wish they did limited release and new coin designs monthly, of 10,000 of this and 30,000 of this, but they apprently dont like collectors, they rather we collect presidential spouses than do a 12 coin series of 10,000 each of animal of the america or a 5 coin release of whatever, if the US mint did more limited coin releases it would make my day instead I buy the 5 oz silver and twice a year commemorates and spend rest of year investing money in Canadian, Perth mints limited releases and bullion stacks

Kevin March 19, 2014 at 1:18 am

Love baseball and will have to pick up a few.

So while the spirit generated by the coin is a rousing, ‘Take me out to the ball game,’ we can be sure that the US Mint pricing will once again feel like it’s ‘Take me out to the woodshed.’

JOE #2 March 19, 2014 at 8:58 am

And with the gold one not being .9999, only being .900, The woodshed is where it will be.

Ryan March 20, 2014 at 12:08 pm

Cost posted:

Mintages Introductory Prices Regular Prices
Proof 50c Clad Half-Dollar 750,000 $19.95 $23.95
Uncirculated 50c Clad Half-Dollar $18.95 $22.95
Proof Silver Dollar 400,000 $51.95 $56.95
Uncirculated Silver Dollar $47.95 $52.95
Proof $5 Gold Coins 50,000 $436.90 $441.90
Uncirculated $5 Gold Coins $431.90 $436.90

*Pricing of the clad and silver commemorative coins are static while those minted in gold can vary each Wednesday depending on a weekly average of the London gold fixing. The gold coin prices are based on an average gold fixing that is within a range of $1,350.00 to $1,399.99 an ounce. Every $50 move from that range, up or down, will result in a $12.15 adjustment in the price of the gold coins. (See Mint gold coin pricing chart.)

Introductory pricing ends on April 28, 2014 at 5 p.m. ET, when regular pricing takes effect. At that time, buyers will have to pay $4 more for each clad half-dollar and $5 more for each silver dollar.

jonny oneal March 28, 2014 at 9:51 am

I bought one silver proof and one clad half dollar but did not buy the gold, although I wanted to. the cost of a 90% gold coin that did not weigh but 28 grams was way too much. By the way, I spent two hours waiting online to buy what I did. Never got in by phone. Question: will my coins qualify for early releases: when i received the 25th anniversary set on the first day of release, i opened it to check the coins. later i learned it would no longer qualify if i submitted it. that info would have been nice in advance, but with the mint´s return policy, are we to just mail off unseen coins to be graded only to learn one might be flawed

Cayli June 21, 2014 at 3:39 pm

How much would a 50c one be if it has never been touched by a human hand?

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