PCGS Currency

Effective February 4, 2009, PCGS Currency is no longer a division of Collectors Universe, Inc.  The PCGS Currency division has been sold to a new company led by current management, including Jason W. Bradford, President, and Laura A. Kessler, Vice President. PCGS Currency will continue to operate out of their current Newport Beach location, and […]

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NEWPORT BEACH, CA—Collectors Universe, Inc., a leading provider of value-added authentication and grading services to dealers and collectors of high-value collectibles, and dealers of diamonds and colored gemstones, today announced that it has sold PCGS Currency, its currency authentication and grading division for collectible currency, to a new company formed for the acquisition and led […]

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(Newport Beach, California) — There’s an interesting "pedigree" to a Series 1918 Federal Reserve $2 note (Fr. 776) recently certified 58 PPQ by PCGS Currency. It has the unusual serial number, K9A, and a specially-worded encapsulation insert prepared for this note honors a fondly-remembered canine pet.

Series 1918 Federal Reserve $2 note (Fr. 776)

"She was a very, very loving dog and an excellent watchdog. If you were sick or not feeling well, Cujo had this motherly thing about her where she would lay in bed with you until you felt better, even for days at a time. She was the most loyal dog I have ever known," said the note’s owner, Brian Smith of U.S. Currency Sales in Palos Verdes Peninsula, California. He purchased it not long after the death of his mixed shepherd dog.

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With only a dozen exceptions, all the paper items in a Florida collector’s home safe were destroyed or damaged by intense heat during a house fire.  The only papers that survived unscathed were 12 bank notes inside PCGS Currency holders, including two 1907 $10 Gold Certificates.

1907 $10 Fr. 1171 banknote

"There were eleven large size and one small size PCGS Currency-certified notes recovered from the fire earlier this year.  The holders were sooty and some had blisters and discoloration on their surface, but the notes inside all survived without damage," said Laura A. Kessler, Vice President of PCGS Currency, a division of Collectors Universe, Inc. (NASDAQ: CLCT).

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Fifteen $20 Federal Reserve Notes from the infamous 1971 "D. B. Cooper" skyjacking were sold for more than $37,000 at Heritage Auction GalleriesAmericana Memorabilia Grand Format Auction June 13, 2008. The notes were owned by Brian Ingram, 36, of Mena, Arkansas who was eight years old in 1980 when he found the only ransom money ever discovered from the still-unsolved skyjacking.

D.B. Cooper Series 1963A $20 bill

Cooper hijacked a Northwest Orient Airlines 727 flight from Portland to Seattle in 1971. During the flight to Seattle, Cooper said he had a bomb and demanded $200,000 and parachutes.

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(Dallas, Texas) – Fifteen $20 Federal Reserve Notes from the infamous 1971 “D. B. Cooper” skyjacking will be offered to the public for the first time in June by Heritage Auction Galleries of Dallas, Texas (www.HA.com).  The notes are owned by Brian Ingram, 36, of Mena, Arkansas who was eight years old in 1980 when he found the only ransom money ever discovered from the still-unsolved skyjacking.

D.B. Cooper Series 1963A $20 bill

 

“Some of these notes have the initials of investigators who examined the recovered money after Ingram found it along the banks of the Columbia River near Vancouver, Washington in February 1980,” said Steve Ivy, Co-Chairman of Heritage and a long-time paper money collector.

“The serial numbers all match the FBI’s list of $20 bills given to the skyjacker known as ‘D.B. Cooper’ who parachuted from a jetliner with the cash somewhere between Seattle Washington and Reno, Nevada during a rainstorm on November 24, 1971.  The 15 pieces consigned by Ingram include two Series 1963-A and four Series 1969 Federal Reserve Notes.”

 

The D.B. Cooper cash will be offered as part of a big auction of Americana memorabilia in Dallas and online, June 13 and 14.

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D.B. Cooper FBI SketchesThe infamous skyjacker D.B. Cooper case is making headlines once again. This year the FBI was notified about the discovery of nearly three dozen D.B. Cooper serial numbers from stolen banknotes. Now the FBI has a possible D.B. Cooper torn and tangled parachute that was found buried by children in southwest Washington.

Cooper hijacked a Northwest Orient Airlines 727 flight from Portland to Seattle in 1971. During the flight to Seattle, Cooper said he had a bomb and demanded $200,000 and parachutes. When the plane landed, he released the passengers in exchange for the money and ordered the pilot to Mexico. While in flight, he jumped from the rear stairway.

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Laura Kessler and Brian Ingram examine D.B. Cooper note fragmentsDuring the recent examination and certification of recovered money from the famous 1971 "D. B. Cooper" skyjacking case, PCGS Currency staff members discovered nearly three dozen serial numbers that apparently had not been previously recorded by the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

The numbers were hidden in layers of notes and note fragments stuck together for decades, and those numbers now have been reported by PCGS Currency President, Jason Bradford,  to the Seattle-based FBI agent overseeing the case.

In a letter to FBI Special Agent Larry Carr, Bradford wrote: "Earlier this month, members of our team examined two dozen environmentally-damaged $20 denomination Federal Reserve Notes and dozens of fragments submitted to us for certification by Brian Ingram of Mena, Arkansas.  As you know, Mr. Ingram was the then-eight year old boy in 1980 who discovered some of the cash given in 1971 as ransom to a skyjacker known as ‘D. B. Cooper’ or ‘Dan Cooper.’"

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An important new resource for paper money collectors now is available online.  The extensive PCGS Currency Population ReportSM, a census database of more than 80,000 notes authenticated and certified by PCGS Currency, is updated daily and is available by subscription to members of the PCGS Currency Collectors Club and PCGS Currency authorized dealers.   “This […]

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Special Note is the First Graded Superb Gem New 69 of Any Large Size Type

IRVINE, Calif. – Teletrade, America’s largest fully automated Internet auction company for certified coins and currency, announces the record-setting sale of an 1899 “Black Eagle” Silver Certificate. Bidding on the note advanced to $30,000 during Teletrade’s December 10 auction, but the note did not meet the reserve.  A day after the sale, Teletrade sold the note to a private buyer who was previously unavailable during auction bidding.

1899 “Black Eagle” Silver Certificate

Teletrade is not releasing the final price the buyer paid or the identity of the buyer, but will confirm the sale price was in excess of $30,000. According to Ian Russell, president of Teletrade, “This note sets records as the highest price paid for a non Serial Number One ‘Black Eagle,’ and it is the second most expensive for the type.”

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