Austrian Mint

The second 100 Euro coin in the gold series "Crowns of the House of Habsburg" will be released on Wednesday, 4th November. It is dedicated to the so-called "Archduke’s Hat", a name derived from the red velvet cap within the crown itself.

Austrian Mint 100 euro Crown of an Archduke Gold Coin
CLICK TO ENLARGE: Austrian 100 euro Crown of an Archduke Gold Coin

The title of archduke was invented by Rudolf IV in the spurious document of 1358/59 called the privilegium maius. It was an attempt to assert the status of the House of Habsburg as the equal of any Prince Elector of the Holy Roman Empire. There exists a mediaeval portrait of Rudolf wearing a crown similar to the Archduke’s Hat. Early versions of the crown have not survived, being either broken up or melted down.

In 1616, however, Archduke Maximilian III of Tyrol had the present Archduke’s Hat fashioned and he gave it to the Augustinian Abbey of Klosterneuburg just outside Vienna in honour of St. Leopold, whose tomb and shrine are still situated there to this day. The crown was not worn as such. There was no coronation. It was rather a symbol of authority and rank. It was brought into Vienna only for the ceremony of homage paid by the Estates of Lower Austria on the accession of a new Habsburg ruler. Even today the crown is not permitted to be outside the walls of the abbey for more than 30 days at a time.

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Twenty years ago in 1989 the Austrian State Mint passed from the Treasury into the ownership of the central bank. The mint was given the freedom to produce and sell products in accordance with the demands of the modern numismatic and investment markets.

Austrian Gold Philharmonic 20 oz Commemorate Coin

One of the very first innovations introduced by the new CEO, Paul Berger, was the production of a gold bullion coin for investment purposes: the Vienna Philharmonic.

On 16th October this year a limited quantity of 6,027 Vienna Philharmonic coins, each weighing 20 ounces of fine gold, will go on sale in Europe, America and Japan.

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The Austrian Mint in Vienna is issuing the second coin in its €10 silver commemorative series "Tales and Legends in Austria". The theme of the new coin is the captivity of the English king, Richard I, on his homeward journey from the Third Crusade in 1192 and the legend of his loyal friend and troubadour […]

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To conclude its six-coin series "Austrian Railways" the Vienna mint is now issuing a 20-Euro silver commemorative coin dedicated to the "Railway of the Future." In the little over 150 years of its existence the railway has revolutionised the transportation and through it, the economies of the world and the life styles of its peoples. […]

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The fifth coin in the series "Austrian Railways" to be issued on 17th June, 2009, is dedicated to the electric train. What began as a fair ground attraction in 1880 in the Vienna Prater rapidly became the most revolutionary step in transportation since the harnessing of steam almost a century before.

Austrian Railways Electric Train Silver Commemorative Coin

The first electric train in Austria was a small locomotive circling in the great exhibition pavilion in the Prater on the occasion of the Emperor Franz Joseph’s 50th birthday. The same monarch issued a licence two years later in 1882 for the first public electric railway.

It used direct current and was a five kilometer long stretch carrying day-trippers from the country town of Mödling into the popular Brühl valley. Other short branch lines soon followed. The introduction of alternating current proved the most reliable for longer railway lines, and in 1911 electric engines using alternating current were put into service on the 90 kilometer stretch to the pilgrimage centre of Mariazell.

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The year 1809 was an important one for Austria in her fight against Napoleon and revolutionary France. On 21st to 22nd May the emperor’s brother, Archduke Charles, became the first general ever to defeat Napoleon in open battle, and in April a folk uprising in Tyrol against its occupation by Bavarian and French troops had […]

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Within its theme of "Austria and its People" the Vienna Mint begins a new sub-series of six silver 10 Euro coins called: Tales and Legends in Austria. The first coin is dedicated to a mediaeval legend from Vienna – the Basilisk. It will be issued on Wednesday, 15th April.

Basilisk Silver Coin from Austrian Mint

The story goes that in the year 1212 a baker’s boy in a shop in the Schönlaterngasse (Lovely Lantern Lane) No. 7 discovered a horrible monster at the bottom of a well. The stench and poisonous fumes of the creature killed all those who inhaled them.

The monster was identified as a basilisk, a mutant creature part snake, part toad, part cockerel. To look into its eyes was instant death. A counsellor learned in such matters was fetched to help and to advise. He said that the only way to destroy the monster was to confront it with its own horrid appearance. Someone must go down into the well with a mirror.

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2009 has been designated "The International Year of Astronomy." To honour this title the Austrian Mint in Vienna has chosen to dedicate its silver-niobium coin this year to this fascinating theme.   The new coin, which goes on sale on 11th March, 2009, displays a three-quarter portrait of the famous mathematician and astronomer Galileo Galilei […]

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On 11th February, 2009, the Austrian Mint honours one of the greatest men in the history of medicine with its third gold coin in the series "Celebrated Physicians of Austria" – Theodor Billroth.

Austria 2009 50 Euro Theodor Physician Billroth Gold Coin

Born on the island of Rügen off the Baltic coast of Germany in 1829, Theodor Billroth had to choose at an early age between his love of music and a career in medicine. He studied in Göttingen and Berlin, and even spent a year studying in Vienna. He gained experience in Berlin and his reputation grew so rapidly that in 1860 he went to Zurich as a professor of surgery. In the following years he rejected posts in both Rostock and Heidelberg, but accepted a teaching appointment in Vienna in 1867.

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On 14th January the Austrian Mint in Vienna issued a silver 5 Euro coin to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the death of one of Austria’s greatest sons, Joseph Haydn.

Austrian Commemorative Joseph Haydn Nine-Sided 5 Euro Coin

Born in 1732 in the village of Rohrau near the Hungarian border, Joseph Haydn began his musical career as a choirboy in the cathedral of Vienna. After his voice broke, he studied composition while keeping body and soul together by taking on pupils.

His big break came in 1761 when Prince Paul Anton Esterházy, head of one of Hungary’s oldest and greatest noble families, employed him as musical director in his court. Haydn conducted and played, but most importantly he composed pieces for the prince and his guests – including such illustrious personages as Lord Horatio Nelson and even the Empress Maria Theresa herself. She often claimed: "When I want to hear a good opera, I go down to Esterház." (The country estate in Hungary.)

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