Heritage’s May CSNS US Coins Auction Tops $52 Million

US coins exceed $27.8 million led by record-setting 1863 $10 gold pattern; US currency adds $12.6 million; world & ancient coins $11.9 million

60

An 1863 Ten Dollar, Judd-349 PR64 Cameo, PCGS. CAC soared to a record $810,000 to lead Heritage’s CSNS US Coins Signature® Auction to $27,825,772.

1863 Ten Dollar, PR64 Cameo
1863 Ten Dollar, PR64 Cameo

That total, combined with Heritage’s CSNS Currency Signature® Auction, which ended at $12,610,964, and the CSNS World & Ancient Coins Platinum Session and Signature® Auction that reached $11,904,407 raised the total for the three events to $52,341,143.

The 1863 Judd-349 ten dollar, which smashed its previous auction record (set in the coin’s last auction appearance, in 1988) of $64,900, is the only gold specimen known to collectors from these dies, and it claims an unbroken pedigree back to its day of striking. Only a few numismatic issues – Judd-349 among them – can claim to be unique.

1795 13 Leaves Eagle, BD-1, MS64+
1795 13 Leaves Eagle, BD-1, MS64+

This magnificent coin was among the Important Selections from The Bob R. Simpson Collection, Part XII featured in the auction, a trove from which highlights also included a 1795 13 Leaves Eagle, BD-1, MS64+ that drew 37 bids on its way to $600,000 and three coins: a 1796 BD-1 Eagle, MS62+ PCGS. CAC, an 1839 Gobrecht Dollar, Judd-109 Restrike, Pollock-122, Unique, PR64 Red and Brown PCGS and a 1799 $10 Large Obverse Stars MS65 PCGS. CAC – each of which reached $360,000.

"The exceptional results in these auctions reflected the outstanding items contained in each one, and cast a spotlight on the understanding of the numismatic collectibles market by the bidders who took part in these events," says Greg Rohan, President of Heritage Auctions. "The CSNS auctions reinforced Heritage Auctions’ status as the premier destination for the most serious collectors as they expand their passion for elite banknotes and coins, from the United States and around the world."

The top result for a lot that was not part of the Simpson Collection was $408,000, for an 1893 Liberty Double Eagle, PR65 Deep Cameo PCGS, more than doubling the auction record of $192,000, which was set at Heritage Auctions in 2022. The Philadelphia Mint decreased production of proof Liberty double eagles to just 59 pieces in 1893, and unfortunately, the issue has a low survival rate, perhaps due to the ready availability of high-grade business-strikes, with a mintage of 344,280 pieces.

1893 $20 PR65 Deep Cameo PCGS. JD-1, Low R.7
1893 $20 PR65 Deep Cameo PCGS. JD-1, Low R.7

Whatever the reason, the 1893 proof Liberty double eagle is an elusive issue in all grades today: PCGS and NGC have combined to certify only 13 specimens between them, with this coin being the single finest. Another double eagle – an 1896 Liberty Twenty, PR66 Deep Cameo PCGS – reached $300,000.

1896 $20 PR66 Deep Cameo PCGS. JD-1, Low R.5
1896 $20 PR66 Deep Cameo PCGS. JD-1, Low R.5.

An 1879 Flowing Hair Stella, Judd-1635, PR66 Cameo CACG, a stunning example of one of the most popular issues in American numismatics, drew a winning bid of $324,000. Although technically a pattern, the 1879 stella, which was named one of the 100 Greatest U.S. Coins, typically is collected as a trophy coin and type issue. The surviving population is in the hundreds, which only adds to the demand for this gorgeous rarity.

1879 Flowing Hair Stella, PR66 Cameo
1879 Flowing Hair Stella, PR66 Cameo

Complete results for Heritage’s US Coins Auction can be found at HA.com/1374.

Currency

A Fr. 2231-A $10,000 1934 Federal Reserve Note. PMG Gem Uncirculated 65 EPQ topped pre-auction expectations when it closed at $432,000 to lead Heritage’s CSNS Currency Signature® Auction to $12,610,964.

Fr. 2231-A $10,000 1934 Federal Reserve Note
Fr. 2231-A $10,000 1934 Federal Reserve Note. PMG Gem Uncirculated 65 EPQ

"The allure of ultra-high denomination banknotes continues to grow, and this note is a perfect example of the kinds of notes that the most serious collectors covet," says Dustin Johnston, Vice President of Currency at Heritage Auctions. "This marked its first appearance at auction ever, and it is the finest New York note graded by PMG, which has graded only two notes equal and three higher among all of the small size $10,000 Federal Reserve Notes."

The finest Fr. 2221-J $5,000 1934 Federal Reserve Note PMG Gem Uncirculated 65 EPQ finished at $384,000. This gorgeous note, with one of just seven serial numbers listed in Track & Price for Fr. 2221-J, is one of just four examples listed in the PMG Population Report with PMG’s highest grade for the Friedberg number and the EPQ modifier. It features the incredibly low 00000020 serial number. PMG has graded only five examples equal and none higher.

Fr. 2221-J $5,000 1934 Federal Reserve Note
Fr. 2221-J $5,000 1934 Federal Reserve Note

A fully original Fr. 2231-A $10,000 1934 Federal Reserve Note. PMG Choice Uncirculated 64 EPQ pulled in a winning bid of $336,000. It is a rarely seen high grade, where strictly original notes are rare. Fewer than 25% of $5,000s and $10,000s are still fully original, or without any restorations.

Fr. 2231-A $10,000 1934 Federal Reserve Note
Fr. 2231-A $10,000 1934 Federal Reserve Note. PMG Choice Uncirculated 64 EPQ

A Series 1878 Triple Signature $50 Silver Certificate, among the rarest of all Federal notes, brought $312,000. Through the Bland-Allison Act, the Silver Certificate was created as an instrument to support the massive influx of newly minted silver dollars into Treasury vaults, because they were easier and cheaper to distribute to banks, but fell short of "full" Legal Tender status. Only six survivors are known; of those, one is in the ANA Museum, and two more are part of the San Francisco Federal Reserve holdings. One of just three in private hands, this example has the longest and most esteemed pedigree, having been part of the Albert A. Grinnell Collection, then included in the collections of Aaron R. Feldman and Thomas F. Morris.

Fr. 324c $50 1878 Silver Certificate
Fr. 324c $50 1878 Silver Certificate

Two notes – a Fr. 187j $1,000 1880 Legal Tender PMG Choice Very Fine 35 that is tied for the finest known Fr. 187j in the series and a Fr. 2221-B $5,000 1934 Federal Reserve Note. PMG Choice Uncirculated 63 EPQ that is the highest PMG-graded 1934 New York $5,000 – ended at $288,000. Of the 14 Fr. 187j $1,000s listed in Track & Price, only seven have appeared at auction in the past 25 years. A small run of Uncirculated $5,000 notes from the New York district was discovered some two decades ago; that group produced the only fully Uncirculated notes from the New York Federal Reserve … including this example.

Fr. 187j $1,000 1880 Legal Tender PMG Choice Very Fine 35
Fr. 187j $1,000 1880 Legal Tender PMG Choice Very Fine 35

Complete results from the Currency auction can be found at HA.com/3595.

World & Ancient Coins

Ancient and modern coins converged when an Octavian, as Consul (ca. 43 BC), with Julius Caesar, as Dictator Perpetuo and Pontifex Maximus. AV aureus (18mm, 8.16 gm, 5h). NGC Choice XF 3/5 – 4/5 and a rare Victoria gold Proof "Una and the Lion" 5 Pounds 1839 PR62 Ultra Cameo NGC each drew a winning bid of $288,000 to lead the World & Ancient Coins auction.

Octavian, as Consul (ca. 43 BC), with Julius Caesar, as Dictator Perpetuo and Pontifex Maximus. AV aureus (18mm, 8.16 gm, 5h). NGC Choice XF 3/5 - 4/5
Octavian, as Consul (ca. 43 BC), with Julius Caesar, as Dictator Perpetuo and Pontifex Maximus. AV aureus (18mm, 8.16 gm, 5h). NGC Choice XF 3/5 – 4/5

The Octavian aureus features one of the very few near-contemporary portraits of Julius Caesar in gold. Portraits in silver and bronze can be had, but gold portraits are exceedingly rare – this example likely is one of fewer than 50 extant. The Una and the Lion 5 is one of the most eagerly pursued of all world coins, struck just two years into Queen Victoria’s reign by renowned 19th-century Royal Mint Chief Engraver William Wyon.

"The fact that these two magnificent coins tied for the top result is only appropriate," says Cris Bierrenbach, Executive Vice President of International Numismatics at Heritage. "The rarity of the gold Caesar portrait makes the Octavian aureus a must-have prize for serious ancient coin collectors, and the Una and the Lion 5 is coveted because it is a stunning piece by William Wyon, one of the most celebrated British engravers."

A beautiful SICILY. Syracuse. Dionysius I (405-370 BC). AR decadrachm (33mm, 43.40 gm, 11h). NGC AUstar 5/5 – 5/5, Fine Style climbed to $132,000. It captures the serenity of Arethusa, wreathed with barley and wearing a triple pendant earring and beaded necklace on the reverse, as well as the action on the obverse of a charioteer driving quadriga galloping left, in flowing chiton, the reins in his left hand, kentron in right, and Nike flying right in field above to crown him.

SICILY. Syracuse. Dionysius I (405-370 BC). AR decadrachm (33mm, 43.40 gm, 11h). NGC AU★ 5/5 - 5/5, Fine Style
SICILY. Syracuse. Dionysius I (405-370 BC). AR decadrachm (33mm, 43.40 gm, 11h). NGC AU★ 5/5 – 5/5, Fine Style

A magnificent Claudius I (AD 41-54). AV aureus (20mm, 7.84 gm, 11h). NGC MS 4/5 – 4/5 sold for $126,000. Fourth in line to the imperial throne, Claudius overcame physical limitations with which he was born to on his way to power after emperor Caligula’s death in 41 AD. The last sole surviving male heir to the Julio-Claudian dynasty, he was given sanctuary by the elite Praetorian Guard. The reverse of this spectacular aureus depicts the Praetorian camp and the legend "IMPER RECEPT" ("The Emperor Received"), a direct reference to the episode at the aftermath of Caligula’s assassination.

Finishing at $108,000 was a Republic gold Proof 100 Francs 1889-A PR63 Cameo NGC, Paris mint, KM832, Gad-1137, Fr-590. From a miniscule mintage of just 100 pieces, it is a beautiful Proof striking of one of the most collectible series in French numismatics and one that remains in demand when witnessed in comparable advanced states of preservation.

Republic gold Proof 100 Francs 1889-A PR63 Cameo NGC
Republic gold Proof 100 Francs 1889-A PR63 Cameo NGC

Another record for the type was set when a Vespasian (AD 69-79). AV aureus (19mm, 7.30 gm, 7h). NGC MS 5/5 – 4/5 sold for $78,000.

Vespasian (AD 69-79)
Vespasian (AD 69-79)

The auction’s highlights also included the sale of 258 lots from the collection of Ayden Ezen, one of the finest collections of high-end Sovereigns to come to market in the last decade.

Included among the collection’s highlights was a Victoria gold "Shield" Sovereign 1841 MS65+ PCGS, KM736.1, S-3852, Marsh-24 (R3) that rose to $96,000. A challenging date to locate in anything approaching Mint State, this example sits atop the certified population at PCGS.

Victoria gold "Shield" Sovereign 1841 MS65+ PCGS,
Victoria gold “Shield” Sovereign 1841 MS65+ PCGS

Also from the Ezen collection is an extremely rare George VI gold Matte Proof Sovereign 1937 PR64 PCGS, KM859, S-4076 var. (matte finish), Marsh-296C (R6) that sold for $72,000. Tied for the finest among just three recognized by NGC or PCGS, this example represented the first full Sovereign with this finish offered through Heritage Auctions.

Beautifully complementing the George VI gold Sovereign was the finest George VI 1937 Matte Proof 1/2 Sovereign, which finished at $38,400, while a Victoria gold Proof Pattern 2 Pounds 1887 PR62 Deep Cameo PCGS brought a winning bid of $28,800 and a Victoria gold "Shield" Sovereign 1853 MS66 NGC closed at $21,600.

George VI gold Matte Proof 1/2 Sovereign 1937 PR64 PCGS
George VI gold Matte Proof 1/2 Sovereign 1937 PR64 PCGS

Complete results from the World Coins Platinum Session and Signature® Auction can be found at HA.com/3115.

About Heritage Auctions

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, Chicago, Palm Beach, London, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam, Brussels and Hong Kong.

Heritage also enjoys the highest Online traffic and dollar volume of any auction house on earth (source: SimilarWeb and Hiscox Report). The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has more than 1,750,000 registered bidder-members and searchable free archives of more than 6,000,000 past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos. Reproduction rights routinely granted to media for photo credit.

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E 1

From the Era of Classical Antiquity: . Dionysius – The God of Excess and Intoxication – Toga! Interesting Coin. Octavian – The Nephew of Julius Geis Cesare. Caligula – now there is one sick King – literally. Plato was the teacher of Aristotle. Aristotle was the teacher of Alexander the Great, and Alexander the Great ruled the world. Aristotle once said, “The only thing Alexander ever wanted was Everything.” Alexander was the king of ancient Greece – a kingdom known as Macedonia. His right hand man was General Ptolemy Soter, who helped Alexander capture Egypt naming it the Ptolemic Kingdom.… Read more »

IMG_0718-Copy
Major D

E 1, I recommend en.numista.com
There is a lot to get lost in exploring the database there.

E 1

Major D,

Thank you. I don’t see how any of the World Mints could possibly knockoff or disrupt this market. 335 BC, is it even possible? 2,300 years ago. Ancients are just insane. All those names came across my philosophy books back in the day. Just so fascinating. So hard to ignore.

Cheers

Kaiser Wilhelm

E 1 and Major D,

Interesting factoid, as follows:

2,600 BC – Great Pyramid of Giza
51-30 BC – Reign of Cleopatra
1,969 AD – First Moon Landing

Time span between the building of the Great Pyramid and the reign of Queen Cleopatra of Egypt = 2,549 years
Time span between the end of the reign of Cleopatra, last Queen of Egypt, and the first Moon Landing = 1,999 years

Cleopatra
E 1

Pompey Gias Magnum, Julious Gias Cesear, and Mark Anthony all had her in the sack. There must have been something really special about her. I read that she loved cats. Since she believed that they were clairvoyant in detecting problem visitors. She also used them to test her men and taste test her food. Defiantly an amazingly high IQ woman that got it.

That 2K year time span thing has me thinking….

Cheers

Kaiser Wilhelm

E 1,

She also wed and bedded her two brothers before those other gents came along so we surely can’t fault her for not being open minded. And as you say she was as sharp as a tack and clever enough to keep the Roman Empire at bay, at least during her own lifetime. All in all, quite the intelligent, adventurous and courageous woman.

Major D

Yes, some amazing stuff.

greece-330
Major D

Stater Chersonessos, Greece 330 BC – 300 BC. Standard circulation coin. Value: Silver Slater. Currency: Drachm

Obverse
Laureate head of Zeus to right, with long locks of hair falling down the back of his neck

Reverse
Artemis-Britomartis seated left on high-backed throne; draped, resting her left hand on the throne and holding, in her right hand, a stag leaping to left

greece-2
Last edited 6 days ago by Major D
E 1

Nice, I concur.

Kaiser Wilhelm

Major D,

A simply gorgeous example of ancient coinage!

Tony@GA

Off topic – rumor is Liberty Brittania silver medal COA has it listed as a “coin”

Yet another error? Wish I’d ordered some – I nabbed a gold and hopeful she arrives okay!

Darek

I just checked my Liberty Britannia order status and both of them(gold coin and silver medals) still showing backorder status and I ordered them within 5 minutes. I guess I have to call them tomorrow to ask if they started the shipping process. Last year I received 2023 Liberty medals with descriptions as “coin” on COA. At the end of the year Mint sent corrected COA for 2 of the medals I ordered.

Darek

Update on Liberty Britannia coin/medals:
Today my Liberty Britannia gold coin is still in backorder status, however the medals are getting ready to be shipped.

Rick

Same here Darek. The Medals were charged to the CC on file, ready to ship…I was about 7 minutes in. I have 5/25 +/- stuck in my head for the Gold, we’ll see…

AKBob

I don’t know if it’s just me but most of these coins just don’t really have much “eye appeal”. Some of the designs are fine but they just aren’t that attractive to me. Don’t get me wrong, I’d be proud to have any one of them, maybe I’m just spoiled at coins being mostly being 69 or 70 and some types of toning aren’t very attractive either. I sure like that paper money! Oh my, would it be nice to have a $10,000 bill or even a $5K bill. I do not collect paper money but I would if I… Read more »

REB

“I sure like that paper money! Oh my, would it be nice to have a $10,000 bill or even a $5K bill.”

I agree! Those $5k & $10k notes are dazzling. They are out of almost everyone’s means but the pictures and the dreams are worth savoring.

Major D

A $10,000 note encased in plastic? Wow, just wow! Sorry, but this just drives home to me how out of control the whole money collecting industrial complex/ apparatus really is.

Major D

Sorry REB, AKBob and others, I didn’t mean this to seem harsh. I just had a visceral reaction to what I considered to be over-the-top. I guess if one had a $10,000 bill the first question would be “is it real?” and the next would be “how can I prove it?” so hence the slabbing. The ambivalence I feel is about whether this is about loving numismatics or about loving money/status/wealth. One could argue that numismatics is about money- and money that makes more money (through added value). But my upbringing is pretty humble, and I prefer the more egalitarian… Read more »

Last edited 6 days ago by Major D
Kaiser Wilhelm

Major D,

I would imagine that for the people who are able to purchase five, six, and/or seven figure numismatic items, money is no object.

E 1

All, Welcome to the Board and the Board Room. We are all a Family here now. MD, no worries, I drink beer and eat pune for breakfast. So do almost all of us here…… Who’s next to sign in? It’s registration day guys. We need more expert posters, not posers, to chime in from around the country. Everyone, leave your ego at home and bring your expertise. Share your intrinsic knowledge of numismatics. Data talks and BS walks. Historical experiences are greatly appreciated as well. The ancient Egyptian’s once said, “A society with the greatest ability to measure would rule… Read more »

Rick

Seems Logical enough….

What Spock says, take his message below and run with it as best you can…

Carry around a Lucky 1C Copper, or a Lucky Octavian Julius Caesar in Gold…You’re an expert with your little treasure…

Thanks for the universal invite E…..
PS: Nice old coins you have up there. And your previous mention of some certain “personally identifiable information”?.. I’ve already forgot about it. I like the way that I ‘Graded’ you to be in my mind…
¯\_( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)_/¯, Later bud…

SPOCK-IMAGE
Rick

Hey E1, by the way. I was curious about your PVC poisoned MS65 Walker–the one you cracked out and dipped for us…A 1943-D?…
Did you re-submit yet? or waiting to send a few at once? Good stuff you showed us…..Updates are welcomed here!

E 1

Rick,

I have about 16 now conserved and staged in a Dansco. When all twenty are done, matched to my satisfaction, then they are off the TPG. It is all about being malicious.

Cheers

E 1

“Meticulous.” This proofreader spell checker is starting to be a problem. “It is all about being meticulous.”

Rick

I’ve been accused of being “Maliciously Meticulous” in my younger days from work, to women… I’ve since relaxed that practice–somewhat…Now if I could just relax a bit more on the coin addict stuff…

Last edited 7 days ago by Rick
E 1

Copy that. Mysteriously, I’ve been there too.

I need to chill out for a while Rick. Too much other stuff going on right now. Passing the baton off to you my Good Brother.

Cheers

E 1

Rick,

So glad you are back.

Cheers

Kaiser Wilhelm

E 1,

Your spell checker appears to have a rascally sense of humor!

E 1

Actually, it has a mind of its own. I hope it is not some kind of AI psycho analysis text writer algorithm.

Kaiser Wilhelm

E 1,

With the highly unlikely exception of a couple of rather burly white-uniformed gentlemen unexpectedly appearing at the door with a pickup order for you, I believe you’re in the clear.

Kaiser Wilhelm

E 1,

We will embrace anything that keeps us from entering the Bored Room.

E 1

Kaiser,

Never boring here. For sure.

Cheers

Kaiser Wilhelm

E 1,

I concur.

Do-you-concur
CaliSkier

Kaiser Wilhelm says: “E 1,

Your spell checker appears to have a rascally sense of humor!”

4DC7420A-6BD9-4370-AA15-74EFC11BE7CC
Kaiser Wilhelm

CaliSkier,

If you are indeed and in fact “assembling” these memes yourself, bonus kudos to you!

CaliSkier

More perplexing numbers out of the US Mint. The current sales report for May 12, is showing 12,678 sold of the AWQ 2023 Eleanor Roosevelt PDS 3-roll sets(23WRF),out of 12,620 possibly available? Just 58, 3-roll sets over the limit! This is the same total as on the last report for May 5, 2024, yet 3 more than had been listed on the sales report for April 28, 2024. With the consistent irregularities, how can anyone trust the supposed “Product” or “Mintage” limits, that are published or “in play” at the US Mint? More Fun with Numbers! Perhaps, the US Mint… Read more »

CF71E1D8-0C89-4807-8C33-4DD2BB02F9BB
Major D

You can add to that the Kennedy 2-roll set (24KB) with sales of 26,791 and a product limit of 26,250; the Alabama AI$ D-Roll (24GRF) with sales of 7,403 and a product limit of 7,350; and the Alabama AI$ P-Bag (24GBB) with sales of 3,155 and a product limit of 3,150. I guess the Mint views Product Limits as aspirational.

Kaiser Wilhelm

CaliSkier,

As someone for whom English is a second language, I have to say while I found it not all that difficult to acquire I still after all these many years continue to be baffled how it is even possible that so much of this language makes absolutely no “cents”.

CaliSkier

Silver to gold ratio now at 81.61:1. I’d like to see a 55-65:1 or even better and then I might convert the majority of my silver to gold? That would sure make transportation and storage, way more convenient! 10oz’s of gold, from 500oz’s of silver sounds palatable IMO. The difference being the gold would weigh, .686lb and the silver would weigh 31.25 pounds!

East Coast Guru

Cali, I like your thinking of reducing weight and space by converting silver to gold. It’s just the timing of it all. Off topic, I see the price charts that zinc has gone up a lot recently. I wonder when the mint will need to switch to a new cheaper base metal for their coins.

Rick

ECG @ zinc,
And every time the Metals surge, Congress? asks the Mint to look into a coin composition change/Study–And guess what–The Mint ‘always’ finds a way to keep on keepin on with the same base metals. To be fair the Mint did extensive research/testing for steel, etc. changes. The vending machine industry(and the Mint)frowns on the change(for obvious reasons)
Cali–You covered this subject extensively recently–I guess it’s time for a refresher?…

East Coast Guru

It looks like only lead and aluminum are cheaper than zinc. Maybe the mint will go to a mixture of lead/aluminum to keep the costs down and to give it a weight that works with the vending machine mfg’s.

Kaiser Wilhelm

East Coast Guru,
I’m surprised that’s even an issue anymore. Considering there is a 7-11 type store on just about every corner, one might think that vending machines would have gone the way of payphones by now.

Rick

And then you can easily fit the goods into your tackle box on your boat–Just watch out for that big wave/wake! We wouldn’t want you to accidentally ‘lose’ your hard earned Gold that was meant for realistic lure glimmering effects!

GOLD-LURE
Major D

To Slab or Not to Slab? That Is the Question. As with everything, I imagine the answer is “It Depends”. From an article I found by Scott Travers, dated Oct 10, 2009. THE 10 GREATEST MYTHS OF ‘SLABBED’ COINS MYTH NO. 1: You can’t get ripped off when you buy a certified coin. MYTH NO. 2: All slabbed Mint State-65 coins are created equal. MYTH NO. 3: Population and census reports tell you exactly how many coins are available. MYTH NO. 4: Slabbing has established a completely fixed, totally consistent grading standard. MYTH NO. 5: Slabbed coins protect you against volatility and… Read more »

East Coast Guru

MD, all myths pointed out on 2009 still apply today. I still buy slabbed coins when I am dropping big dollars on a coin to help reduce (not eliminate) the chance of it being cleaned, counterfeit, etc. There are fake slabs out there, but doing your due diligence can reduce that chance, plus the haggling over a coins grade when selling can be reduced as well with a slab.

E 1

I concur.

Rick

I guess “It Depends” is relative and evermore subjective–coin by coin E1 and Major D,

So here it is. I had PCGS ‘crack’ this coin out(below), the 2014-P UNC Clad for a fresh holder(slab scratches near nose & in hair). I requested to keep the label–Great !

2014-P-KENNEDY-UNC-1
Rick

And here’s what they sent back to me(sorry bad lighting–but same coin–verified)..

Not exactly the same label lol…Not even a phone call or email giving me a heads up/option?–Just an arbitrary decision and they sent it off to me. I paid $69 bucks for everything–$27 was just for shipping it to me–1 coin!
Time for a heart to heart w/PCGS…
Myth #10…30 seconds and a decent pair of dykes gets you your “cracked out” coin–Myth busted…

2014-P-KENNEDY-UNC-LABEL-ERROR-1
E 1

Well, it photographs better. Looks good from here. That 2014-D UNC HR in MS-69 that you sent in for conservation is the one that I am still curious about.

Rick

Except when I go to sell this P-Clad.. I could be accused of trying to sell a counterfeit silver Kennedy P- Proof Coin based on the obverse? However a quick look at the 8 digit cert #, or the 6 digit industry # will reveal the true ID of the coin(below). I find it irresponsible that PCGS let the(above)obverse label fly–I cannot. Soon enough it will be in the correct & problem free holder. Here I go again being “Maliciously Meticulous” lol…

2014-P-KENNEDY-UNC-LABEL-ERROR-2
E 1

Rick,

Ok, I’m having a little trouble trying to figure out what the problem is. So, the certification number is screwed up? It tracks to another Kennedy coin of a different composition?

E 1

I should probably start checking the numbers on all the coins that I have.

Rick

E1, Perhaps I’m not clear enough, or I’m being cryptic like Cag? My apologies, sometimes I can’t spit out what I’m trying to say.. So here goes…*But first, see my coin photos above–*the 2 pics that show the original Obverse label(1), and the brand new Obverse label that they gave the same coin(2). *READ both obverse labels* The original label(1)matches your label to a “T”. The new label(2) does not match your label to a “T”… My 2014-P Clad Kennedy is just like yours, except it’s an SP-69. Same 6 digit industry #530182(a First Strike Variety Label of Industry #530181)check… Read more »

E1-UNC-SET-2014
Rick

My brand new label(they were supposed to save my orig. label=Nope…Read it in its entirety…
Next reply, take a look…

2014-P-KENNEDY-UNC-LABEL-ERROR-1
Rick

That label, seen above, belongs to a very specific set of coins. And only one set of coins–The 4 coin SILVER SET from 2014.
See your photo below…

E1-2014-CLAD-SET-2
Rick

The 2014-D UNC HR SP-69 has me a bit nervous. I handed it to them 2 months ago at the show. it’s been stuck in the ‘grading’ status for well over a month now. I also wanted them to keep the original label, based on your advice. Keep Label is plastered huge on the submission form(like the P-cion) I also pointed out the spot for them to conserve/remove(circled)… I’ll tell you what E1. Here’s the link below from PCGS as a sharing option for submissions. You, and the world can watch the progress on this 2014 UNC-D Coin. You may… Read more »

2014-D-KENNEDY-UNC-SP-69-OBV
E 1

And this one has been stuck in limbo for months? The conservation service request may have slowed it down.

Rick

Agreed on the conservation efforts slowing it down. Also PCGS does not count the weekend days..Any day now hopefully.

Kaiser Wilhelm

Rick and E 1,

Since I have never had a single coin slabbed, I am a stranger in a strange land when it comes to the workings of this process. Upon reading your series of comments above, even several times in succession, proved to me beyond any shadow of a doubt that try as I might I was not going to be able to, at least for the most part, make heads or tails of that dialogue.