2023 Quarters Celebrating U.S. Women in Silver Proof Set

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April’s first release from the United States Mint debuts today at noon ET with the 2023 American Women Quarters Silver Proof Set™. Collectors and enthusiasts may appreciate the set not only for its unique composition but also for its significance in recognizing and celebrating the contributions of American women.

Mint image 2023 American Women Quarters Silver Proof Set
U.S. Mint product images of their 2023 American Women Quarters Silver Proof Set

The set contains the five 2023 American Women Quarters each struck from 99.9% pure silver. All five are produced at the U.S. Mint’s facility in San Francisco and ship together in one protective lens.

Included in the 2023 American Women Quarter Silver Proof Set are coins honoring the following individuals:

  • Bessie Coleman – shattered barriers in aviation, despite the obstacles she faced as a woman of color
  • Edith Kanakaʻole’s – strove to preserve Hawaiian culture through music, dance and education
  • Eleanor Roosevelt – staunch advocate for civil liberties and human rights with a long-lasting impact on society
  • Jovita Idar – activist for Mexican-American rights utilizing education and journalism to advance her goals
  • Maria Tallchief – Native American ballerina helped to break down racial barriers in the performing arts

The similar non-silver proof set of 2023 Women quarters was issued on March 21st of this year, and over 40,000 were sold in the first six days.

CoinNews photo 2023 American Women Quarters Proof Set
This CoinNews photo shows a lens protecting traditional clad coins in the previously issued 2023 American Women Quarters Proof Set. The latest proof set features the same quarters, but each one is struck in .999 fine silver.

2023 marks the second year for the Mint’s American Women Quarters Program™. Last year saw the inaugural release for the series with coins honoring Maya Angelou, Sally Ride, Wilma Mankiller, Nina Otero-Warren and Anna May Wong. The program is scheduled to run for four years, from 2021 to 2025.

CoinNews photo lens 2022 American Women Silver Quarters Proof Set
This CoinNews photo shows a lens holding the coins in last year’s 2022 American Women Silver Quarters Proof Set.

Portraits of the honored individuals are found on the reverse (tails side) of each quarter along with inscriptions including their name, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, E PLURIBUS UNUM and QUARTER DOLLAR.

The obverse (heads side) of each quarter contains a portrait of George Washington, the first President of the United States. The portrait used for the series was originally created by Laura Gardin Fraser as a candidate entry for the 1932 quarter.

2023 Proof Silver Quarter Specifications

Denomination:
Quarter
Finish:
Proof
Composition:
99.9% silver
Weight:
6.343 grams
Diameter:
0.955 inch (24.26 mm)
Edge:
Reeded
Mint and Mint Mark:
San Francisco – S

 

Combined, the five quarters of the set total a silver weight of 1.01966 troy ounces.

Ordering and Price

2023 American Women Quarters Silver Proof Sets may be ordered directly from the U.S. Mint via its page dedicated to quarter products.

Each is initially offered for $80, representing a $7 increase over last year’s release.

An initial household order limit of 5 sets has been established.

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Dazed and Coinfused

Hi all.

Last edited 5 months ago by Dazed and Coinfused
Kaiser Wilhelm

Howdy, Doody! 🙂

Dazed and Coinfused

.199 Troy oz x 5 coins is .995 Troy ounces. Not sure where the 1.01966 came from. Must be that cute little tag top center of the case.

Kaiser Wilhelm

Also a few stray muons, mesons, hadrons, bosons, and up/down/charm quarks.

Dazed and Coinfused

Oh forgot the fun fact. While Amelia earhart was credited with flying across the Atlantic, she never actually flew. She was a passenger. I believe she was with Lindberg. Been a while since I saw that bit o history, and was shocked when I heard it. Too bad she wasn’t black, she’d be on a coin just for getting her license. Which I guess if like the DMV probably took as long to get as crossing the Atlantic. So kudos to patience. I wonder how long after the Wright Brothers first flight it took until the gubmint cashed in by… Read more »

Kaiser Wilhelm

Beg to partially differ, Dazed and Coinfused. While Amelia Earhart did indeed cross the Atlantic Ocean in 1928 as the first female passenger on a trans-Atlantic flight (not with Lindbergh though), in 1932 she became the first female pilot to make a solo non-stop trans-Atlantic crossing. Just sayin’.

Kaiser Wilhelm

Excuse me, Ma’am, you must be aware you were exceeding the flying above the clouds limit. Could I see your pilot’s license and aircraft registration please?

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Craig

I say kudos to Amelia. Can you imagine flying across the Atlantic in 1928, that would require some fortitude and a lot of courage. I remember the last time I flew to Cancun and while crossing the Pacific was thinking to myself:”Man, this would be a bad place to go down!” We could sure use a lot more women like Amelia instead of what we now have…Caitlin, AOC, and that girl on the Bud lite can!

Kaiser Wilhelm

You have a firm amen from me on all of that, Craig; very well put indeed!

Dazed and Coinfused

Harriet Quimby, a well-known journalist, became the first American woman to obtain a pilot’s license in 1911. She died a year later when her new plane pitched her into Boston Harbor. She was also first female to fly English channel solo. In 1921, Bessie Coleman was the first Black woman to receive a pilot’s license but was issued by international aviation in France. The same place earhart got hers years later. Maybe should be an asterisk on the coin. While she did come back as a black pilot, it wasn’t obtained in America. Not sure how she traveled to France,… Read more »

Dazed and Coinfused

First, Quimby, not higby. Second due diligence Sourced from airandspace dot edu She was accepted by the Caudron Brothers School of Aviation, a well-respected flight school run by the renowned builders of World War I aircraft, and traveled to France to purse her goal. Flying the Nieuport 82 dual-controlled trainer, she earned her pilot’s license – the first African American woman to do so. Not only that, she earned her license in just seven months. She quickly determined she needed more training to safely perform barnstorming stunts and someday operate her own flight school. She returned to Europe in early… Read more »

Kaiser Wilhelm

A fascinating tale of curiosity, initiative and stick-to-it-tive-ness!

Kaiser Wilhelm

Wasn’t National Geographic the only “nudie mag” around in the 1950’s?

Dazed and Coinfused

Depends on the publisher. Some headlines and articles gave the impression that she was a pilot, co-pilot and her role was she actually flew. If I recall the documentary states that the issue was settled once and for all when she made her flight solo several years later. By giving title if copilot it implied that during those long legs she would have to take over or at least do some flying. It seems every flight she did had issues and controversy. I believe the 1928 flight ran out of fuel. And her radio didn’t work the actual flight she… Read more »

Kaiser Wilhelm

Flying is an interesting thing in that outlook and attitude have a lot to do with how one relates to it. For example, in the late summer of 1959 the Lockheed Super Constellation my family and I were aboard on a flight from Heidelberg (Germany) to New York found itself having to circle the Azores for an hour in a rather violent thunderstorm waiting for conditions to eventually improve enough to try to make a safe landing there. I remember in that moment that at age twelve I felt no concern or fear whatsoever regarding what could happen to the… Read more »

Super_Constellation_Cabin.jpg
Kaiser Wilhelm

It’s not that your explanation was “vague or unclearly stated”, dazed and Coinfused; rather, the original reports from back in the day that you had no choice but to rely on regarding the actual details of those flights were customarily sketchy at best and possibly erroneous at worst to begin with.

Antonio

I hope they do issue a quarter commemorating Amelia Earhart. Time will tell.

Dazed and Coinfused

It’ll never happen, they can’t prove she’s dead.

Craig

But can they use her silhouette on a coin, like they did with Nolan Ryan on the 1992 Commemorative Dollar? Like they say “there’s always a way around anything.”

Kaiser Wilhelm

She was however legally declared dead two years after she went missing, so I would think the Mint would be covered in that required department.

Antonio

Mine are on their way to me. Only ones I’m ordering.

Kaiser Wilhelm

These are without a doubt some exceptionally attractive coins, Major D and Antonio!

victor

Can someone verify if US Mint making 2023 fractional silver eagle set? Just got txt msg from MCM with tag price of $500 for NGC RP70. They aren’t offered on us mint website. I posted this 1 other time elsewhere.

victor

Check the image.

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Carl S

Not from US Mint, notice in the picture you sent it says Fiji.

victor

Few! I didn’t look close enough lol. Thanks.

Kaiser Wilhelm

victor and Carl S, that is one heckuva racket the Fiji folk have going there, eh?

Seth Riesling

The U.S. Mint lawyers are hard at work filing a trademark infringement lawsuit on the company & reps like Mike Mezack & government of Fiji with cease & desist papers for those who are involved in breaking the federal USA public law titled the Hobby Protection Act from the 1970s as amended & updated in the 1990s. Yikes!

NumisdudeTX

Kaiser Wilhelm

And this is going to be enforced by a Marine Recon Unit landing on the main island’s prime beach and seizing the “Fiji Mint”?

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Seth Riesling

Kaiser,

And Fiji will become our 51st state! (Complete with a Fiji state quarter coin by the U.S. Mint).

NumisdudeTX

Kaiser Wilhelm

We’ve been in Germany so long (a total of seventy-eight years since the end of WWII) and with such a huge presence I’m surprised we haven’t yet graced them with statehood number 52, right after Puerto Rico at 51 and before Fiji at 53.