2020 Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller 5 Ounce Silver Uncirculated Coin Launch

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One of the United States Mint’s final products of the year is available with their 2020-P Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park Uncirculated Five Ounce Silver Coin launching today at noon ET.

2020-P Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated Coin and Packaging
Uncirculated 2020-P Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller Five Ounce Silver Coins arrive encapsulated, set inside a protective outer box and include a U.S. Mint Certificate of Authenticity

It is composed in 5 ounces of 99.9% pure silver and boasts an enormous diameter of 3 inches. Like the companion quarter released in September, the new coin carries a reverse (tails side) image honoring the park in Vermont. It is the 54th of 56 designs created as part of the U.S. Mint’s America the Beautiful programs which feature one design recognizing a site of national interest in each state, the District of Columbia and the five U.S. Territories.

Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park was established in 1992 and takes its name from three of its previous owners. Today, the park includes 643 acres dedicated to the interpretation of the history and evolution of conservation stewardship in America. It operates in companionship with a nearby working dairy farm known as the Billings Farm & Museum.

Coin Designs and Specifications

U.S. Mint artist Donna Weaver created the unique design which is seen on this coin and on companion Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller quarters. A description provided by the U.S. Mint reads:

"Ms. Weaver’s design depicts a young girl completing the planting of a Norway spruce seedling near an established tree, continuing the life cycle of the forest. The child represents conservationists seeking to maintain a sustainable forest for future enjoyment and education."

"LAND STEWARDSHIP" appears below the spruce seedling. Inscriptions around the scene include "MARSH-BILLINGS-ROCKEFELLER," "VERMONT," "2020," and "E PLURIBUS UNUM." The design was sculpted by U.S. Mint sculptor Michael Gaudioso.

Photo of 2020 Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park Quarter
The Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park quarter for Vermont depicts a young girl completing the planting of a Norway spruce seedling near an established tree, continuing the life cycle of the forest. The CoinNews photo above shows a proof version of the quarter released earlier this year. The larger 5-ounce silver coin features the same design, but in a vapor blast uncirculated finish. It also has a flat or smooth edge compared to the reeded edge found on quarters.

All America the Beautiful coinage share the same obverse (heads side) portrait of George Washington. The effigy was created by John Flanagan and has been on quarter dollars since 1932.

Obverse of a 2019-P ATB Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated Coin
This CoinNews photo shows the obverse or heads side of an America the Beautiful Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated Coin held within its protective capsule. The portrait and inscriptions are common across the five-ounce series, and on companion quarters.

Obverse inscriptions include "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA," "LIBERTY," "IN GOD WE TRUST" and "QUARTER DOLLAR."

2015 Homestead 5 Oz Silver Coin Edges
This CoinNews photo shows the incused edge lettering that is on America the Beautiful Five Ounce Silver Coins

An edge incused inscription contains the specifications of "999 FINE SILVER 5.0 OUNCE."

Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated Coin Specifications

Finish: Uncirculated
Denomination: Quarter
Composition: 99.9% Silver
Weight: 5.000 troy oz.
(155.517 grams)
Diameter: 3.000 inches
(76.20 mm)
Edge: Lettered

 

Ordering and Price

Those interested in purchasing a 2020-P Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park Uncirculated Five Ounce Silver Coin may do so directly from the U.S. Mint by visiting their product page for silver coins.

Current pricing listed at $229. A mintage limit of 13,750 is shown.

Five Ounce Silver Bullion Coins

In addition to the earlier issued quarters and this release, the U.S. Mint produces 5-ounce silver bullion coins sharing the same designs. Unlike quarters and uncirculated coins which the U.S. Mint offers directly to the public, their bullion coins are sold through their network of authorized purchasers for a small premium above their melt price.

The bullion coins showcase a brilliant finish unlike the vapor blast finish of the uncirculated coins. In addition, a ‘P’ mintmark is found on the uncirculated coins indicating their production at the Philadelphia Mint. The bullion coins have no mintmark, although they are also made at the Philadelphia Mint. The Mint reports sales of 45,000 for the Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller Five Ounce Silver Bullion Coin.

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Christopher

Glad we’re nearing the end of this series. Hardly worth it at double the spot silver price. Does anyone know if the price will drop due to the fall in metal prices?

Last edited 6 months ago by Christopher
Mjs

I wouldn’t hold my breath

Seth Riesling

Can you imagine the collectors who were enrolled in the subscription for this series of coins getting an automatic subscription charge on their credit card for $229 instead of the price of $178.25 before the Oct. 13. And silver has dropped to $23 basically today. Almost double spot silver price! Simply asinine…

NumisdudeTX

Chas. Barber

Or the Proof ASE @ a minimum of 3x spot!! If you like/love it buy it, not an investment w/200k mintage. Even the V75 will fall @ 75k mintage. And I suspect a new low # will slime out of the USM in 2021

Mark D.

What are they going to do in 2021 for the clad and silver ATB sets with just a single quarter remainig in the series? Will proof, mint and uncirculated sets decrease in price accordingly? Ha!

Mjs

Im thinking they will include the last ATB quarter and the new one with Washington crossing the Delaware River with those sets – but a price reduction? fat chance….

Douglas Worsley

Got mine yesterday, someone looted it out of the box, got the receipt and cover of the box, no coin. Obviously fed ex has some issues with stolen merchandise. Not sure if mint will cover my loss, anyone ever have this experience?