2011 American Silver Eagle Anniversary Set Scheduled

by Mike Unser on October 13, 2011 · 18 comments

Collectors were told in August to expect the American Silver Eagle 25th Anniversary Set in "late October." A firmer release date is now available, based on an update Wednesday to the United States Mint’s website.

2011 American Silver Eagle Anniversary Set

United States Mint image of the American Silver Eagle 25th Anniversary Set. (Click image to enlarge.)

While subject to change, the Mint is planning to release the anniversary set on October 27, 2011. The launch date was added to the Mint’s "2011 Scheduled Products Listing" page which visibly sports the message:

"All dates are subject to change by the United States Mint without prior notice."

The biggest question on most collectors’ minds, the price for the anniversary set, is still unanswered. Given recent volatile precious metals prices, the price may not be announced until a few days before the set’s release. However, it should be lower than previously expected given that three of the coins in the five-coin set are currently sold individually and two of them just had their prices reduced by $9.50. More on a potential price later…

[Update: The United States Mint announced the price for the anniversary set on Thursday, October 20. It will be $299.95.]

The American Silver Eagle was first issued by the United States Mint in investment-grade bullion and in collector proof versions back in 1986. Marking the series’ 25th anniversary, the set will include:

  • One 2011 Bullion American Silver Eagle (released individually on January 3)
  • One 2011-W Proof American Silver Eagle (released individually on June 30)
  • One 2011-W Uncirculated American Silver Eagle (released individually on September 15)
  • One 2011-S Uncirculated American Silver Eagle (not sold separately, and not an annually released product)
  • One 2011-P Reverse Proof American Silver Eagle (not sold separately, and not an annually released product)

On Friday, October 7, the Mint lowered the price of the proof Eagle from $68.45 to $58.95 and cut the cost of the uncirculated Eagle from $60.45 to $50.95. Bullion Eagles are generally available for a few dollars over the current spot price of silver, which hovered around $32.50 on Wednesday. Based on these numbers, it would suggest that the anniversary set could be priced within a $250-$280 range.

2011 American Silver Eagles - Bullion, Proof and Uncirculated

The bullion, proof and uncirculated coins (shown above) are three of the five coins that will be packaged within the American Silver Eagle Anniversary Set. The United States Mint has scheduled the set’s release for October 27, 2011.

The United States Mint said in August that it plans on producing up to 100,000 anniversary sets.

Every American Silver Eagle coin since 1986 has been struck from .999 fine silver and shares the same obverse and reverse designs. The obverse features a modern version of sculptor Adolph A. Weinman’s "Walking Liberty" which was used on the silver half-dollar between 1916 and 1947. The reverse, designed by John Mercanti, features a heraldic eagle with shield.

{ 18 comments… read them below or add one }

Poggie October 13, 2011 at 7:26 am

The TWO not available are a must for the collector…seems a high price to pay for these two…then an un-mintmarked San Fransisco certified Eagle will be required to have them all for 2011.

James October 13, 2011 at 12:31 pm

These are really nice, but the average american can hardly afford them. I have tried to buy a proof every year along with a burnished when they make them. Here’s An Idea…. Why not do a Collector’s Version of the Winged Mercury Dime in .9999, and make it just like this 5 coin set? It would be more affordable overall, and I think it would do so much in volume as the ASE’s. Same goes for the nickel. Make a set (5) of the Buffalo’s…
Both Special Collector Series that would be more affordable for the average joe that collects (not for the profit) but because I love collecting affordable coins. Just My 2 cents

James October 13, 2011 at 12:35 pm

I forgot to mention that I have nothing against Eisenhower or Jefferson, I just liked the art of these coins better. I can’t imagine how they would look in .9999 silver…..

Larry corrie October 13, 2011 at 7:56 pm

The set sounds great but they should put a mint mark on the uncirculated collector coin so it has proof ! Or they could just put any coin in the spot and claim it’s a San Fransico unc .

John October 14, 2011 at 12:06 am

With the mintage of 100,000,I’d like to see a limit of 1 or 2 per household for the first month to allow more collectors the opportunity to own a set.

Michael Clark October 14, 2011 at 8:39 am

100,000 will probably be quite enough. Consider the Lincoln Coin & Chronicles set – at 50,000 they sold out within 30 hours. They showed up on eBay at 3X Mint price, but that died down quickly, and though it’s still a premium to buy one, most of those who didn’t get in early on the Mint orders probably picked one up after-market. Still, had the Mint produced 100K of these, the initial rush would likely have been more sedate, and they might not have sold out.

Fosnock October 14, 2011 at 9:19 am

Michael Clark – You state that “had the Mint produced 100K of these, the initial rush would likely have been more sedate, and they might not have sold out.” I disagree all they would have done to sell out is increase the household limit from 1 per household to 3 per household.

Larry – The San Fransico unc will have a “S” mint mark

Springer October 14, 2011 at 12:45 pm

Has the Mint assured they will only sell the Reverse Proof and San Francisco Uncirculated only in this 25th anniversary set? If the Mint sells these two coins outside the set the way they did in 2006 with WestPoint Uncirculated they will reduce the demand for the set considerably. With less than two weeks before the set goes on sale the Mint has not presented much detail, I would like to see them be clearer in their intent. But then again, they are the Mint we are only the customers.

Stuart Wheeler October 15, 2011 at 8:43 am

For what it’s worth, I’m going to assume that the mint will charge at least $300 for the 5 coin set. And with the massive popularity of the silver eagles with the numismatic public at large, with a limited mintage of only 100,000 sets….I’m assuming that they will all be sold out within 12 hours after release or perhaps even before sundown Thursday evening on the 27th. I will state that I’ve ordered many times before from the U.S. Mint and never have failed to receive my order including the 2006 Anniv. set; the 2009 Ultra High Relief and all the 2009 Lincoln products. I should include the 2010-P Hot Springs 5 ounce coin with a mintage of 27,000 coins. The point is, I’ll be surprised if my order gets through this time; the world won’t come to an end if I don’t end up with this 5 coin set. And, that’s the attitude I’ve had from day 1. Good luck to those who will be ordering.

joe October 15, 2011 at 1:57 pm

i wish the mint would end the ase’s series and start something new. i can’t afford to collect them anymore. but i will try to purchase the 25th anniversary set to keep my collection complete.

J pay October 15, 2011 at 6:32 pm

said at first limit 1 per now 5 it will be a secondary sellers buy out should limit to only 2 my thoughts and only be able to get the s mint mark and reverse proof in that set only or it will DEADEN THE SET

jeff October 16, 2011 at 5:53 am

The mint has them listed for $229. A reasonable price in my opinion. Hopefully they keep it there.

J pay October 18, 2011 at 7:16 pm

now its off product index not listed

Springer October 20, 2011 at 6:30 pm

The price is 299.95 per US Mint press release 10-20-11
http://www.usmint.gov/pressroom/?action=press_release&id=1296

Joe October 21, 2011 at 9:46 am

$60.00 a coin or is it the fancy box that costs the extra money? Silver is at $31.17 right now.

Brian October 24, 2011 at 12:36 pm

The US Mint sent out everybodies subsciption Silver Eagles at the higher price, then made them unavailable for 2 weeks (the return policy from the Mint is 7 days) THEN, they made the Eagles available at the lower cost to those that didn’t have subscriptions. All that time, the price of Silver fluxuated a couple of dollars an ounce. And they refuse to refund the difference of the two prices to those that had subscriptions. Considering this is the FIRST year they started to sell the coins after a 2 year suspension, it appears they did this intentionally to make extra money before the price drop went into affect. They just screwed every subscriber in the US Silver Eagle program. And now they want DOUBLE the price of Silver for the 5 coin set. Are they just TRYING to run off the collectors? What a racquet. What a rip off. I’m tempted to STOP buying coins from the Mint becasue of it. They have made literally thousands of dollars from my purchases over the years and now they want to screw ALL of the subscribers for less than $10 per coin. What has collecting come to?

DR October 27, 2011 at 12:59 am

Brian, I agree. I was also a ‘victim’ of the 5 oz silver coin reduction. However, although I’ve only been collecting a few years, thanks to the upward trend in the precious metals, the only coins I’ve lost money on when trying to sell later is the Braille silver coins. I guess their target market didn’t read the slick marketing materials?

Brian October 27, 2011 at 1:23 pm

It’s AMAZING to me, that the US Mint is willing to rip-off customers. The Silver Eagle issue that I mentioned on an earlier post for example. They are willing to risk loosing a customer that has bought almost every offering they have made in the last 10-years just to make an extra $10 on ONE coin. Makes NO SENSE to me.
@DR: I about at the same point as you. I am seriously considering cacelling every one of my subscriptions. Another reason (other than the Silver Eagle issue) is that I can usually buy almost all they offer on eBay at a cheaper price if I just don’t get in a hurry to buy. Another reason is POOR quality control by the US Mint. I can’t even begin to tell you how many substandard quality coins I have had to return to the Mint (at MY expense) just to get ANOTHER poor quality coin in return. Why should the customers have to pay return shipping cost on poor quality products? At some point, it becomes cost prohibitive.

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