$299.95 Price for American Silver Eagle 25th Anniversary Set

by Mike Unser on October 21, 2011 · 6 comments

2011 American Silver Eagle Anniversary Set

The United States Mint will release the American Silver Eagle 25th Anniversary Set on October 27 at noon ET for a price of $299.95

Pricing for the American Silver Eagle 25th Anniversary Set was announced on Thursday by the United States Mint.

The collectible anniversary set featuring five 2011-dated American Silver Eagles will be available for $299.95, more than some expectations but less than others. Scheduled for release on October 27, the sets have an order limit of five per household.

Reaffirmed by the Mint Thursday as well was the 100,000 maximum mintage, which is appealing to coin collectors given two of the five coins in the anniversary set may only be available through it. The five coins include:

25th Anniversary Set Information

Coin Mint Mark* Released Individually Price Latest Sales Figures**
2011 Bullion American Silver Eagle None January 3 Variable 36,043,500
2011 Proof American Silver Eagle W June 30 $58.95 771,792
2011 Reverse Proof American Silver Eagle P No N/A N/A
2011 Uncirculated American Silver Eagle W September 15 $50.95 190,927
2011 Uncirculated American Silver Eagle S No N/A N/A

 

*The denoted mint marks that appear on each coin indicate where they were produced. "W" is the United States Mint at West Point, "P" is the United States Mint at Philadelphia, and "S" is the United States Mint at San Francisco. The bullion Eagle, while produced in San Francisco, has no mint mark.

**Sales figures are as of Monday, October 17, 2011, with the exception of the bullion coin which has an as of date of Friday, October 21, 2011.

American Silver Eagles date back to 1986 when bullion and proof versions were first released annually. Joining the two coins was an uncirculated annual version which launched in 2006. 2006 also marks the time when the United States Mint released a special reverse proof, which has a frosted background with a polished, mirror-like foreground. It was only available for a short time, was struck in Philadelphia, and could only be purchased through a limited mintage set that celebrated the Eagles’ 20th anniversary.

Each Eagle is composed of .999 fine silver, has a diameter of 1.5 inches and a reeded edge. While the bullion coin is intended for investors, the proof and uncirculated coins are numismatic products struck with coin collectors in mind.

The United State Mint has indicated that it will begin taking orders for the anniversary set beginning at noon ET on the 27th. Upon its release, buyers can visit the Mint website at http://www.usmint.gov/catalog or call 1-800-USA-MINT (872-6468) to place an order.

{ 6 comments… read them below or add one }

Richard October 22, 2011 at 11:37 am

Well ASE collectors we’ve been waiting for this set i’m in for one set to keep my set compete.Having said that i feel somewhat violated,but not suprised by the what seems to me to be a bit pricey,$255. would be more in line with with current ASE mint product line.The alternative is even worse considering the second sellers are really going to hammer you on this one.So step up on HIGH NOON EST on the 27th and pull out your gredit card,make sure your mint acct is current.This is going to be a really cool set.Oh yes if i feel violated its self inflicted.ENJOY

John October 22, 2011 at 2:38 pm

I wish that the mint made the America the Beautiful series on the back of the Kennedy half dollar. It would have given the mint a larger area for the art and breathed new life into a great coin. I would be able to afford a silver series like that.

Brian October 24, 2011 at 1:21 pm

The US Mint sent out everybodies subsciption Silver Eagles at the higher price, then made them unavailable for 2 weeks (the return policy from the Mint is 7 days) THEN, they made the Eagle available at the lower cost to those that didn’t have subscriptions. All that time, the price of Silver fluxuated a couple of dollars an ounce. And they refuse to refund the difference of the two prices to those that had subscriptions. Considering this is the FIRST year they started to sell the coins after a 2 year suspension, it appears they did this intentionally to make extra money before the price drop went into affect. They just screwed every subscriber in the US Silver Eagle program. And now they want DOUBLE the price of Silver for the 5 coin set. Are they just TRYING to run off the collectors? What a racquet. What a rip off. I’m tempted to STOP buying coins from the Mint becasue of it. They have made literally thousands of dollars from my purchases over the years and now they want to screw ALL of the subscribers for less than $10 per coin. What has collecting come to?

RonnieBGood October 25, 2011 at 7:20 pm

Collectors,
They do have a larger area for the America the Beautiful works of art work – The 5 oz silver issues. Then again the issue of cost makes it difficult for the casual collector to afford to collect the series. A few years ago the mint reduced the number of coin items available to a more sensible amount. But this year they have again increased the number of items available. I love the idea of the anniversary sets but please, US Mint, do not threaten the overall value of the coins you issue by flooding your own market. Take a look at how many ways you may purchase the America the Beautiful quarter series from the US Mint!!
Have a great day all…

Richard October 26, 2011 at 10:54 am

Good morning,we are all personally responsible for our buying habits.I personally cancelled all of my subscriptions,i don’t want them to know in advance what i’m going to purchase.I look at the product schedule and comming products daily,as well as this site.That works for me.The mint product are in the most part is trash,that can be had for face value.

paul brinkman November 1, 2011 at 9:46 am

11/1/11

Sirs:

Everything to do with the 25th anniversary set — from late announcement — to a dreadfully lacking number of sets and a woefully insufficient number of Mint personal available to not even be available to say, “No, we’re sold out,” was pitifully inept. If the Mint didn’t have the monopoly on OUR own money, it would have gone out of business years ago. Lousy beyond words.

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