2024 Greatest Generation Commemorative Coin Images Unveiled

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The United States Mint unveiled images of the 2024 commemorative coins honoring the Greatest Generation. These images were showcased on Capitol Hill earlier this week at an event hosted by Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur.

Authorized under Public Law 117-162, known as the Greatest Generation Commemorative Coin Act, which was originally introduced by Rep. Kaptur, the U.S. Mint will begin offering $5 gold coins, silver dollars, and half dollar clad coins bearing designs that are emblematic of the the National World War II Memorial and the service and sacrifice of American soldiers and civilians during World War II, starting on Feb. 29.

U.S. Mint images and design descriptions of the commemorative coins follow.

$5 Gold Coin Image

2024 Greatest Generation $5 Gold Coin - Obverse and Reverse
U.S. Mint images of the 2024 Greatest Generation $5 Gold Coin – Obverse and Reverse

Obverse Designer: Heidi Wastweet
Obverse Sculptor: Eric David Custer

The obverse (heads) design features a section of the Wall of Stars at the World War II Memorial with an Olive Branch. Each star on the wall represents 100 Americans who lost their lives in the war, and the Olive Branch represents the peace that followed thanks to their sacrifice. The inscriptions are "LIBERTY," "IN GOD WE TRUST," "2024," and "WORLD WAR II MEMORIAL."

Reverse Designer: Ben Sowards
Reverse Sculptor: Joseph Menna

The reverse (tails) design shows a folded American flag, such as one that would be presented at the funeral of a fallen service member. The inscriptions include "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA," "E PLURIBUS UNUM," "WWII MEMORIAL," "TO UNITE THE GENERATIONS OF TOMORROW," and "FIVE DOLLARS."

Silver Dollar Image

2024 Greatest Generation Silver Dollar - Obverse and Reverse
U.S. Mint images of the 2024 Greatest Generation Silver Dollar – Obverse and Reverse

Obverse Designer: Beth Zaiken
Obverse Sculptor: Phebe Hemphill

The design features six figures working together to support the Earth, illustrating the cooperation of each of the military branches (Army Air Forces, Coast Guard, Navy, Army, and Marine Corps), as well as the Merchant Marine during World War II. The inscriptions are "1941-1945," "WORLD WAR II MEMORIAL," "DEFENDERS OF FREEDOM," "LIBERTY," "IN GOD WE TRUST," and "2024."

Reverse Designer: Ben Sowards
Reverse Sculptor: Renata Gordon

The reverse design features a view from beneath a baldacchino, a sculptural canopy inside a Victory Pavilion in the World War II Memorial. The sculpture depicts four eagles holding a laurel wreath, within which is a globe centered on the Pacific Ocean. The inscriptions are "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA," "E PLURIBUS UNUM," "VICTORY," "IN THE AIR," "AT SEA," "ON LAND," "WWII MEMORIAL," and "ONE DOLLAR."

Half Dollar Image

2024 Greatest Generation Half Dollar - Obverse and Reverse
U.S. Mint images of the 2024 Greatest Generation Half Dollar – Obverse and Reverse

Obverse Designer: Elana Hagler
Obverse Sculptor: Craig A. Campbell

The obverse design re-imagines the Victory Medal that was awarded to all who served in the Armed Forces during World War II. The figure of Liberation stands with open arms holding two halves of a broken sword, symbolizing the war’s conclusion. The inscriptions are "LIBERTY," "IN GOD WE TRUST," "WORLD WAR II," "2024," and "WE ANSWERED THE CALL."

Reverse Designer: Matt Swaim
Reverse Sculptor: John P. McGraw

The reverse design depicts the World War II Memorial from the point of view of a person walking up a ramp leading to one of the towers. The inscriptions are "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA," "E PLURIBUS UNUM," and "HALF DOLLAR."

Coin Sales Will Include Surcharges

Each coin’s purchase price will include a surcharge that will be directed to the non-profit Friends of the National World War II Memorial. This funding will support the National Park Service in maintaining and repairing the memorial, as well as for educational and commemorative programs.

For more information about the U.S. Mint’s Greatest Generation Commemorative Coin Program, visit catalog.usmint.gov/greatest-generation-commemorative-coin/.

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REB

I think I like the half dollar designs the best. I am just happy that commemoratives are being issued again.

Domenic Vaiasicca

I find silver Dollar then half Dollar best designed…gold coin not so much

Dazed and Coinfused

Lot of buzzwords on them. Didn’t see much freemasonry influence on them. They managed to be DEI. But those war chickens look sick. Is liberty leg exposed or does her toga cling tightly without wrinkle. Not sure how the folded flag represents them more than any other war did, unless it was the first time flags were given to the families. But it’s cool the gold coin is complete s h y t e as it will be easy to save money to not buy it. Oh yeah, and they are round and flat and contain metal. Also, if this… Read more »

Last edited 2 months ago by Dazed and Coinfused
Dazed and Coinfused

Since new generation don’t know what money looks like, and like to abbreviate, and barely knows we read left to right and top to bottom

In God world we trust war II (too)

Dazed and Coinfused

To unite the generations of tomorrow. They rolling in their Graves just how divided it became. And it looking like a crazy weekend coming. If that tomorrow was Wednesday or Thursday. But everything is pointing to a throw back of ww2. New deal, now green new deal. Jrws facing problems, Russia being a pain. Only difference is russia won’t join the allies this time, Germany begins as an ally, as does Japan, not sure where Italy falls as the chick running it seems to miss the good old days according to her. Tuskegee were the first blacks, now the deciding… Read more »

East Coast Guru

I like the reverse of the dollar best. Although not sure I like the globe in it. It shows mostly the Pacific Ocean. Well, whatever, I am good for one of these in a couple of years when the price craters.

Dazed and Coinfused

Don’t forget, you’ll also get a free red oak box with it. And free shipping

Dazed and Coinfused

My assumption is the first 180 degrees of the globe are on obverse with everyone holding up the world touching the water (how that works I don’t know) and the other 180 degrees on the reverse shows the pacific, but on a different scale. I suppose they had to enlarge to show Hawaii (as one island) and it also meant way less detail on engraving if most of the coin was flat water.