Anti-counterfeiting Seminar Held for Kansas & Missouri Law Enforcement Officers

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The Anti-Counterfeiting Educational Foundation (www.ACEFonline.org) recently conducted an eight-hour class, "Counterfeit Coin and Precious Metals Investigations" to 35 Kansas and Missouri local, state and federal law enforcement investigators.

ACEF Seminar Nov
Dozens of Kansas and Missouri law enforcement agency representatives attended a seminar organized by the Anti-Counterfeiting Educational Foundation. (Photo courtesy of Anti-Counterfeiting Educational Foundation.)

Participants in the ACEF seminar were shown examples of fake numismatic items during the training session held in the Kansas City suburb of Mission, Kansas.

"This educational program is one of the many strategic initiatives of ACEF to address the mass proliferation of counterfeit coins and precious metals within the U.S. marketplace," said seminar co-presenter Doug Davis, ACEF Director of Anti-Counterfeiting.

"Chris Hersey, Senior Agent in the U.S. Treasury Department Office of Inspector General, and I prepared a comprehensive presentation designed to provide attendees with the skill set to thoroughly investigate counterfeit coin and precious metals cases and identify the tools and investigative resources provided by ACEF," explained Davis, a former Texas Police Chief.

The class began with a basic overview of the numismatic and precious metals industry to familiarize attendees with the many complexities involved in numismatic and counterfeit crime investigations.

"By understanding the inner workings of these types of crimes the attendees gained the knowledge to identify clandestine activities of counterfeiters and targeted victims," said Davis.

Topics included identifying major sources of counterfeits, distribution methods within the U.S., counterfeit diagnostics, identification of targeted victims, jurisdictional issues, and case development. The instructors utilized a display of counterfeit coins and precious metals to provide attendees with hands-on experience in identifying the different types of counterfeit coins and precious metals currently flooding the U.S. marketplace.

ACEF Seminar counterfeits
Law enforcement agency attendees at the recent Anti-Counterfeiting Educational Foundation seminar near Kansas City saw examples of fake rare coins and bullion coins as part of the educational program. (Photo courtesy of Anti-Counterfeiting Educational Foundation.)

The class attendees identified various testing methods and tools available to detect counterfeits including a demonstration of the Sigma Metalytics Pro Verifier, and they learned about several current counterfeiting case studies.

"The class provided the law enforcement professionals with the fundamental investigative techniques and resources, knowledge, and understanding to respond effectively to the complex challenges encountered during the investigation of crimes related to counterfeit coinage and precious metals. Attendees received a certificate of attendance and PCGS and NGC encapsulation samples as educational tools for other investigators within their respective agency.

ACEF logo

The continued success of ACEF depends entirely upon the support of the numismatic industry and community. ACEF is a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation and monetary contributions can be made online at www.acefonline.org/donate or by check to ACEF, 28441 Rancho California Rd., Ste 106, Temecula, CA 92590.

For additional information about donating, contact ACEF Executive Director Brueggeman at info@acefonline.org.

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East Coast Guru

Good to see law enforcement learning about counterfeits. Based on the picture, I wonder if I have any counterfeits. A proof silver eagle is in the mix. Must be the special enhanced “S” I assume.

Kaiser Wilhelm

I’ve been to educational work seminars, and to think that these lasted for eight hours is impressive. That’s a long haul for anybody and indicates a high degree of dedication.

PS – I don’t understand why my comment requires approval. I’m truly baffled.

Last edited 16 days ago by Kaiser Wilhelm
Kaiser Wilhelm

Obviously this was cleared up and quite quickly at that. Thank you very much.

Dazed and Coinfused

Probably cuz of something I said. They just figure you’re guilty by association.

Kaiser Wilhelm

Ah hah. Is there something I should be made aware of?

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Kaiser Wilhelm

East Coast Guru, are you by any chance referring to the 2019-S Enhanced Reverse Proof American Silver Eagle?

Dazed and Coinfused

Ngc suggests that all the coins get graded so that they can’t be counterfeited. And they are never wrong.

Kaiser Wilhelm

It is a well known fact that not only loose but graded and slabbed coins as well can be fake, so we can’t be sure third party certification guarantees the elimination of counterfeiting. Makes me wonder if NGC sends their overflow business to China.

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Dazed and Coinfused

Notice. All the coins are in a pile on too of each other. So are they actually grading your coin or someone else’s? I also don’t see a magnifier so how can they assess it. On a side note. With the graders going to a 10 scale. (Only ngc, but you know others will follow) but if you send, does it remove them from the previous population and add only to the 10 scale? I think it is just a way to lower the numbers to show more scarcity artificially. It’s like split ticket voting. They still represent the party,… Read more »

Kaiser Wilhelm

That thoroughly scrambled hodgepodge of submitted coins is being graded on the honor system, to wit, where there is no honor there is no system.

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