Heritage Offers Rarities in Nov. 2 World & Ancient Coins Auction

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A medallion from one of the best and most important collections of ancient coins ever sold through Heritage Auctions could bring $200,000 or more when it crosses the block Nov. 2 at Heritage Auctions’ World & Ancient Coins Platinum Session and Signature® Auction.

Maxentius (AD 307-312). AV quaternio or medallion of 4-aurei
Maxentius (AD 307-312). AV quaternio or medallion of 4-aurei

The Maxentius (AD 307-312). AV quaternio or medallion of 4-aurei (33mm, 21.12 gm, 1h). NGC MS 5/5 – 2/5, Fine Style, smoothing is exceptionally rare – the offered example is one of just two known – and comes from the Paramount Collection, one of the top troves ever sold by the world’s leading numismatic auctioneers.

"This is an extraordinary coin from an exceptionally significant collection," says Cris Bierrenbach, Executive Vice President of International Numismatics at Heritage Auctions. "The market for elite international and ancient coins remains strong, and this magnificent specimen is a prime example."

The exceptional medallion was issued as a commemorative during the restoration of the temple of Urbis Veneris, erected by Hadrian in AD 135 and damaged by fire in 307 AD.

Also offered is the finest certified example of a British India William IV gold Proof Restrike 2 Mohurs 1835.-(c) PR67 Cameo PCGS (estimate: $100,000-120,000). Among all half, single and double Mohur Restrikes currently submitted to NGC and PCGS, only two others grace the lofty PR67 designation, including a single other 1835 2 Mohurs notably lacking the "Cameo" designation bestowed upon this offering, making this an absolute prize among British India collectors.

British India William IV gold Proof Restrike 2 Mohurs 1835
British India William IV gold Proof Restrike 2 Mohurs 1835

A Vitellius (16 April-22 December AD 69). AV aureus (19mm, 7.41 gm, 7h). NGC Choice XF 5/5 – 3/5, edge marks (estimate: $70,000-100,000) is a popular dynastic issue showing the emperor on the obverse and his father on the reverse.

Vitellius (16 April-22 December AD 69). AV aureus
Vitellius (16 April-22 December AD 69). AV aureus

A technically flawless kilo issue of an Elizabeth II gold Proof "Gothic Crown Quartered Arms" 1000 Pounds (Kilo) 2021 PR70 Ultra Cameo NGC (estimate: $60,000-80,000) is a beautiful rarity from a limited-edition presentation mintage of just 20 examples from the Great Engravers Series, highlighting the masterworks of William Wyon exclusively and one of only a handful in the kilo size to come to market over the last year.

Elizabeth II gold Proof "Gothic Crown Quartered Arms" 1000 Pounds
Elizabeth II gold Proof “Gothic Crown Quartered Arms” 1000 Pounds

An exceptionally rare Octavian, as Consul (ca. 43 BC), with Julius Caesar, as Dictator Perpetuo and Pontifex Maximus. AV aureus (18mm, 7.89 gm, 3h). NGC Choice Fine 4/5 – 2/5, scratches, edge marks (estimate: $50,000-75,000) offers one of the very few near-contemporary portraits of Julius Caesar in gold. The elusiveness of gold Caesar portraits often is the last hurdle to those collectors of the Roman series who seek a portrait set of the first 12 Caesars in gold aurei.

Octavian, as Consul (ca. 43 BC), with Julius Caesar, as Dictator Perpetuo and Pontifex Maximus
Octavian, as Consul (ca. 43 BC), with Julius Caesar, as Dictator Perpetuo and Pontifex Maximus

Silver and bronze examples are more plentiful, but it is believed fewer than 50 of all types remain in gold. The offered example is from the type struck closest to Caesar’s lifetime, issued by his grand-nephew and adoptive heir, Octavian. This coin likely was struck at a military mint in southern Gaul upon his assumption of the Consulship in July 43 BC.

An impressive Claudius II (AD 268-270). AV medallion of 8 aurei (37mm, 39.09 gm, 12h). NGC Choice VF 4/5 – 2/5, Fine Style (estimate: $50,000-75,000) boasts an ornate military bust of this heroic ruler. During the siege of Milan in mid-AD 268, Gallienus was assassinated and Claudius acclaimed emperor in his place by his fellow officers. The Senate approved Claudius’ elevation, but the all-important soldiers proved restive, as Gallienus had treated them well.

Claudius II (AD 268-270). AV medallion of 8 aurei
Claudius II (AD 268-270). AV medallion of 8 aurei

Claudius was forced to buy them off with a massive bribe of 10 gold aurei apiece. The highest officers likely received payment in the form of gigantic gold medallions of 8 aurei struck at the mint of Milan, like the specimen offered in this auction. These were the largest Roman gold pieces struck to that point, and the reverse made a plea for "harmony in the army" (CONCORDIA EXERCITVS).

Petropolis Collection

The auction also includes 256 lots from this extraordinary collection of seldom-seen Brazilian gold rarities. The Petropolis Collection includes the magnificent specimens from the early days of coin minting until the fall of the empire and the start of the Republican era. The main focus of the collection was to complete the gold series — a tall task when considering how many dates and types have such limited known populations. The lots in this auction represent the second of three parts of the Petropolis Collection, which includes popular rarities from the 6400 series, as well as many coins with impressive grades. It is exceedingly rare to see this many scarce Brazilian pieces offered at the same time, making this auction a priority destination for Brazilian gold collectors.

Highlights from the collection include, but are not limited to:

A Maria I & Pedro III gold 6400 Reis (Peça) 1777-R AU Details (Cleaned) NGC – just the second example offered at auction in the last two decades (estimate: 12,000-16,000)

A Jose I gold 3200 Reis 1772-R MS61 NGC (estimate: $6,000-8,000)

A Maria I & Pedro III gold 3200 Reis 1781-B MS61 NGC (estimate: $5,000-7,000) – featuring the second-finest grade recorded by NGC, after a single MS62

A Jose I gold 3200 Reis 1760-R XF40 NGC (estimate: $3,000-4,000)

A Jose I gold 3200 Reis 1756/2-R XF40 NGC (estimate: $2,000-3,000) – an original specimen with no other known examples

A Maria I gold 6400 Reis (Peça) 1789-R MS64 NGC – the finest graded by either NCG or PCGS (estimate: $1,500-2,000)

A Jose I gold 2000 Reis 1771-(L) MS65 NGC – the finest graded by either NCG or PCGS (estimate: $1,200-1,600)

Images and information about all lots in this auction can be found at HA.com/3102.

About Heritage Auctions

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, Chicago, Palm Beach, London, Paris, Geneva, Brussels, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

Heritage also enjoys the highest Online traffic and dollar volume of any auction house on earth (source: SimilarWeb and Hiscox Report). The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has more than 1,500,000 registered bidder-members and searchable free archives of five million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos. Reproduction rights routinely granted to media for photo credit.

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Kaiser Wilhelm

Medallions, restrikes and presentation pieces all described as coins; very interesting.

Antonio

Medallions, restrikes and presentation pieces, oh my!

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Kaiser Wilhelm

My sentiments exactly, Antonio…

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Kaiser Wilhelm

Just to be sure, I consulted the Anthropomorphic Astronaut; he agrees.

Smoke
Kaiser Wilhelm

I consider him very reliable since he’s seen so much of the world.

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Antonio

By Jove! Why don’t they show the whole coin, both sides?

Kaiser Wilhelm

As you wish and at your service, by displaying both a visage of the late Queen and an authentic piece of the Concorde’s heat shield, here are both sides of that coin.

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Antonio

I meant something like the 2021 gold Proof Gothic Crown Quartered Arms. The Roman coins/medallions would have been helpful as well. Veni, Vidi, Vici.

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Kaiser Wilhelm

Wow, the Royal Mint sure does know how to make beautiful gold coins!

But where’s a picture of the other side of it? 😉

Last edited 1 month ago by Kaiser Wilhelm
Antonio

It’s the fourth coin pictured in the article. Smartie. 😉

Kaiser Wilhelm

And to think all I had to do was put 2 and 2 together to get to 4.

Antonio

For the Maxentius quaternio or medallion of 4-aurei.

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Antonio

For the Claudius II medallion of 8 aurei.

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Kaiser Wilhelm

It’s both fascinating to know but nevertheless difficult to imagine what life in those ancient times must have been like, and it’s very humbling to realize that two thousand years from now people will be saying something similar about us.

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Antonio

Unless humanity falls into another dark age. 🙁

Kaiser Wilhelm

In which sad case all the libraries will have closed or disappeared with people inevitably having forgotten how to read and instead gone back to drawing stick figures on the walls of their dank caves.

Antonio

Some are already in that state, sadly.

Kaiser Wilhelm

The libraries, the people, or both, Antonio? Wittch du u meen?

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Antonio

Libraries? What’s that?

Kaiser Wilhelm

Libarry (take a guess) is to library (book lending place) as Calvary (Mount of the Crucifixion) is to cavalry (soldiers on horses).

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Last edited 27 days ago by Kaiser Wilhelm
Antonio

William IIII 2 Mohurs.

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Antonio

I stand corrected.

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Kaiser Wilhelm

Honestly, Antonio, I wouldn’t have quibbled about one more or less Mohur.

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Antonio

I stick with base metal and silver myself.

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Kaiser Wilhelm

Count me in, Antonio, as a member of the Lower Metals Club.
After all, platinum, gold and palladium are on a higher plateau.

Antonio

I thought it was somewhere. Octavian, as Consul (ca. 43 BC), with Julius Caesar, as Dictator Perpetuo and Pontifex Maximus.

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Antonio

I think this is a better version. Offered by Heritage Auctions.

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Kaiser Wilhelm

Those are some rather fancy titles, Antonio, that the Roman rulers chose to give themselves. Not, of course, that they in any way manage to outdo Der Kaiser. 😉

Kaiser Wilhelm

Kaiser Wilhelm II, King of Prussia, 5 Mark, 1907, Obverse…

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Kaiser Wilhelm

A much nicer 1913 version of the above pictured coin…

Last edited 1 month ago by Kaiser Wilhelm
Kaiser Wilhelm

.

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Kaiser Wilhelm

Wait a second, Antonio; I just noticed they really aged the portrait of Der Kaiser on this latter edition of the coin. I don’t recall ever getting the memo, so pickelhaubes will have to roll!

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Antonio

Ah yes, Imperator, Augustus, Pater Patriae, Consul, Tribune, Pontifex Maximus, etc., etc.
Pontifex Maximus (PM) still used by popes to this day.

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Kaiser Wilhelm

Antonio, I once had a best friend (he has since passed away) who for some reason stuck with an unfailing habit throughout our fifty-plus years of snail mail correspondence of addressing me as Imperator Rex; to this day I’m not sure if he meant Emperor King or King Emperor.

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