U.S. Mint Free American Liberty Offer Expires Aug. 20

21
2017 American Liberty Gold Coin - Obverse, e
A CoinNews photo showing the obverse side of a 2017 American Liberty High 1 Ounce Gold Coin

The United States Mint promotion of a free 2018-W $10 American Liberty 1/10 Ounce Gold Coin when buying a 2018-W $100 American Liberty 1 Ounce Gold Coin ends on Saturday, Aug. 20.

This offer was originally set to expire on Aug. 15, but it was extended five days.

Prices for the pair of 24-karat gold coins, which share the same designs, are $2,715 and $335 apiece. The promotion takes away the smaller coin’s $335 price.

Based on U.S. Mint weekly sales reports, the offer has enjoyed some success since it was introduced on Aug. 1. The three weekly reports before the promo began showed gains for the 1-ounce gold coin of 158; 74; and 48. The two reports since the promo’s start have the gold coin increasing by 1,004 and 595.

U.S. Mint sales through Aug. 14 have the 2017 $100 American Liberty at 37,506 and the 2018 $10 American Liberty at 51,323. The Mint initially stated the authorized mintages for each gold coin at 100,000 and 135,000, respectively.

The body of a Mint email to customers about the promotion follows.

American Liberty Offer Extended to August 20!

24-Karat Bonus Offer – Add Two Gold Coins to Your Collection for the Price of One

For a limited time, when you buy the award-winning 2017 American Liberty One Ounce 225th Anniversary High-Relief Gold Coin at regular price, you will receive a companion 2018 One-Tenth Ounce American Liberty Gold Coin at no additional cost. The price for both coins together will be the same as the price for the one ounce version by itself.

To get this offer, you must order at the link below.

Both coins were struck in 24-karat gold and feature the design that won "Gold Coin of the Year" at the International Coin of the Year awards.

There is no household limit on this special offer, but inventory is depleting. Don’t miss out! Offer expires on August 20!

Get Bonus Offer.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

21 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Rooster

Nice offer but have to pass.

Antonio

Me too. The last time I bought gold from the Mint was when the Gold Buffalo was introduced. It was a great price I couldn’t pass up. The next year the price went up and I haven’t bought U.S. Mint gold since. Have bought British half sovereigns and sovereigns and Chinese gold Pandas instead.

Kaiser Wilhelm

I would say, Antonio, getting that one as your last gold from the US Mint was a really smart choice; what an amazingly beautiful coin!

Antonio

Yes, it is. Another smart choice was buying the 1995 anniversary AGE set with the 1995 W ASE. One of the best purchases I made.

Kaiser Wilhelm

OMG, Antonio, you are the exceedingly fortunate owner of a 1995-W ASE Proof! It takes a lot to make me jealous, but you just more than made the cut. What a fabulous coup it was for you to acquire that coin!

1995-W ASE PR70UCAM 1553290-001 O.jpg
Antonio

I also own a set of 1835 to 1857 U.S. Large Cents and 1851 to 1862 Silver Three Cents (my favorite).

Kaiser Wilhelm

That’s some pretty fancy coinage you have there, Antonio. My collection is far more modern, common and modest, but then, I’ve never been one to ask for much in general.

East Coast Guru

I wanted to get that 4 gold coin set with the W ASE when it was offered ‘95. Couldn’t pull the trigger due to family issues. I had to pay a lot more for the set about 15 years ago. Love the ‘95 set and even though I paid a lot more for it, I am glad I saved up for it.

Kaiser Wilhelm

I have a feeling, East Coast Guru, that even with the higher purchase price in the long run you are still ahead, at least I certainly hope so. In any case, you have yourself a beauty of a Set there.

Kaiser Wilhelm

I pass on all gold, Rooster. It’s just too pricey, meaning I can add lots of silver coins to my collection for the cost of a single gold one.

Rich

Sir Kaiser, did you see the typo in the first sentence of this report: it should read 2017-W $100 American Liberty 1 Ounce Gold instead of 2018-W $100 American Liberty… Just saying, because you have made note of other errors in the past.

Last edited 1 month ago by Rich
Kaiser Wilhelm

Excellent catch, Good Sir Rich aka Mr. Sharp Eyes! Kudos, my friend!

Hopefully Mike Unser will take notice of your observation and subsequent correction and proceed to make the required change in the article above.

Last edited 1 month ago by Kaiser Wilhelm
Antonio

Why do ads continue to promote Trump “coins”?

Rich

Any BOGO promos?

Kaiser Wilhelm

Good Sir Rich,

You didn’t by any chance mean to hit the Z key rather than the G.

Kaiser Wilhelm

There are likely several answers to that question, Antonio, and just as likely very few that will not ignite another war of the comments. I plead at least the Fifth…and maybe more.

Adam L

I already have both. I got them graded by PCGS and got 70DCAM on both. But I got mine for way cheaper than with this offer

Kaiser Wilhelm

Luck has been with you, Adam. Congrats on all counts!

Adam L

Thanks Kaiser. I just submitted the 2015 Liberty 1oz Gold at the world fair of Money last week. I submitted the 2021 Liberty Gold but that one graded 69DCAM. So far just the 2019 Liberty gold 1oz and the 2 2017 have graded 70. I submitted 3 of the 2022 silver Liberty at the Show. And I ordered 2 online. Thinking about going to the Long Beach coin expo next month.

Kaiser Wilhelm

You’re most welcome, Adam L, and good for you on all those top flight gradings. Those are stellar additions to your obviously splendid collection;
it definitely sounds like you are building quite a sizable gold showcase there!

Kaiser Wilhelm

By the way, and while I am aware this will not hold water numismatically speaking, I do believe a bit too much is made about the difference between a 69 grade and a 70 grade. Realistically speaking there is no objective way to guarantee a coin to be without any defect whatsoever, and additionally, the non-enhanced visual perception of the difference between many a 69 and a 70 are likely apparent only to the extremely select few.