2018 Breast Cancer Awareness Commemorative Coin Pricing Announced

by Mike Unser on January 29, 2018 · 5 comments

Designs for 2018 Breast Cancer Awareness Commemorative Coins

Obverse and reverse designs for the 2018 Breast Cancer Awareness Commemorative Coins

Introductory prices for clad 50c and silver dollar Breast Cancer Awareness Commemorative Coins will range from $25.95 to $51.95, according to the United States Mint.

Their sales along with companion pink-hued $5 gold coins — a first for the U.S. Mint — will begin at noon ET on March 15, 2018.

Designs for the collectibles were unveiled in October. They will be shared across the clad, silver and pink gold coins.

Obverses (heads side) feature a butterfly and two women. The older woman has her hands on her chest and a relieved expression on her face. The younger woman, with a scarf on her head, holds one hand over her chest and the other raised in a fist as if she is ready to fight. Reverses (tails side) depict a Tiger Swallowtail butterfly in flight, a symbol of hope.

Product options include proof and uncirculated editions. The following table lists their prices:

Commemorative Coin Introductory Price* Regular Price
Breast Cancer Awareness Proof Silver Dollar $51.95 $56.95
Breast Cancer Awareness Uncirculated Silver Dollar $48.95 $53.95
Breast Cancer Awareness Proof Clad Half Dollar $27.95 $32.95
Breast Cancer Awareness Uncirculated Clad Half Dollar $25.95 $30.95
Breast Cancer Awareness Proof Gold $5 Coin TBD
Breast Cancer Awareness Uncirculated Gold $5 Coin

 

*Introductory pricing is normally in effect for around the first 30 days.

These prices do represent increases from last year’s commemorative coins. They are higher by:

  • $4 for the proof silver dollar
  • $2 for the uncirculated silver dollar
  • $6 for the proof half-dollar
  • $5 for the uncirculated half-dollar

Opening prices for the pair of Breast Cancer gold coins will be known by Wednesday, March 14. They can change weekly based on gold market conditions and the U.S. Mint’s coin pricing schedule. If both coins launched today, their intro prices would be $421 for the uncirculated and $431 for the proof.

As mandated by their authorizing law (Public Law 114-148), surcharges of $35 per gold coin, $10 per silver dollar and $5 per clad half-dollar are included in each price. When collected from each coin sale, they will be paid to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation (www.bcrfcure.org) to further its efforts in breast cancer research.

{ 5 comments… read them below or add one }

Seth Riesling January 29, 2018 at 12:01 pm

Mike Unser –

The last sentence in this article might need some clarification (the Mint also needs to put this disclosure/disclaimer on its brochures like it did for a short while, but did not on this year’s first commemorative coin program that started earlier this month or on last year’s two programs brochures). The U.S. Mint only pays out the mandatory surcharges paid by customers to the designated charities only if the programs make a profit after ALL expenses incurred by the Mint. Otherwise, the Mint keeps the surcharges & nothing is paid to the charities (this has happened a number of times in the past few years).

-NumisdudeTX

John D Moore January 29, 2018 at 2:58 pm

Seth I agree.The mint should also be accountable for the money that does not make it to the charities.

Cincinnatus January 30, 2018 at 8:46 am

With a spot price of $17.27 (currently) plus $10 surcharge, that leaves $24 for the mint to produce this coin and package it. That is assuming they sell out and pay the cost incurred. On a good day this coin will resell from a dealer for $5 to $10 above spot which means you will sell to a dealer for a couple of dollars over spot. Commemorative coins are a horrible investment unless silver goes to near $50. The clad coins are worse – they are basically junk drawer status.

I respect the cause but it would seem to be better to just donate $50 to the charity and take the tax write off.

yorbasasa January 30, 2018 at 9:02 am

I am strongly agreed with you. Never sell the expensive ones in EBay too. Just sell it to coin shops. I had a worse experience : selling the real silver proof eagle,and return for fake one.

Ernesto February 16, 2018 at 11:52 am

@Cincinnatus – I don’t think most people buy modern commemorative coins for investment purposes. They usually buy them because they have some connection to the theme of the coin or they want to have a complete set. I do agree with you that if they want to support a cause it’s definitely better if they donate money directly versus buying a commemorative coin!!

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