US Mint Reduces Prices on 2016 Sets

by Mike Unser on January 21, 2016 · 17 comments

Nixon, Ford Presidential $1 Coins

Photos of the 2016 Presidential $1 Coins featuring Nixon and Ford. The Reagan $1 design will be unveiled Feb. 6.

The United States Mint has trimmed prices on eight annually issued collector sets. The sets are varied in makeup, ranging from coins in qualities of proof and uncirculated to coins composed in clad and silver.

What they do have in common are Presidential dollars, and that’s why their prices are lower than last year.

Coins of former presidents have been issued at the rate of four per year since the dollar series kicked off in 2007. The series ends this year with only three presidents left to commemorate — Richard M. Nixon, Gerald Ford and Ronald Reagan. The Mint’s new pricing exactly reflects the reduced number of dollars in each set.

US Mint Pricing for Sets with 2016 Presidential $1 Coins

Release Date 2016 Price Change from 2015
2016 Proof Set TBD $31.95 -$1.00
2016 Silver Proof Set TBD $52.95 -$1.00
2016 Mint Set TBD $26.95 -$2.00
2016 Presidential $1 Coin Proof Set Feb. 16 $17.95 -$1.00
2016 Presidential $1 Coin Uncirculated Set Mar. 29 $14.95 -$2.00
2016 Annual Uncirculated $1 Coin Set TBD $45.95 -$1.00
2016 Presidential $1 Coin Set – Philadelphia August $11.95 -$1.00
2016 Presidential $1 Coin Set – Denver August $11.95 -$1.00

 

The new pricing information comes via a document dated Jan. 13, 2015 and published Wedneday in the Federal Register, the official source of notices by government agencies and a daily journal of their proceedings.

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Ron

WOW!! They reduced it dollar for dollar! Unc. dollars sell for over $3 each and proofs go for over $4.50 each. Shouldn’t the discount match those prices??
Also… Silver and gold have almost hit bottom. Will the mint wait until the end of the year to reflect this decline in their silver coin/set offerings, after most sets have sold??
Have to wait and see, I guess……

jim

I guess now we know how much packaging really costs for each of these coin sets.

Mike

Just like big business, you waste no time inflating prices to keep ahead of the market. When prices fall they take a very long time dropping prices. Less collectors, lower sales, very costly to keep up with collection, you wonder when the us mint will wake up and realize they will sell more and make more at lower prices that reflect market pricing for precious metals than high prices and lower sales. Any collector would buy more than one or a different set if they didn’t have to mortgage their house to afford over inflated coins from the mint.

Tinto

@Mike Seeing the way the Mint has been operating, I think the Mint doesn’t really care squat about true collectors. IMO they have to be seen as also catering to collectors in order to avoid Congress, etc. coming down on their heads but they’ve been favoring the big buyers and the authorized purchasers. For example they introduce this new version of a 1oz Liberty which would become the first of a new “line” (can’t find the right word) of Liberties and one would think they would keep initial HH limits reasonable like 5 or so, but no they up it… Read more »

Seth Riesling

With base metals at multi-year lows & silver hitting a 6-year low last month, these $1& $2 per coin 2016 coin set price decreases are absurd! Thanks for the New Year “Gift” U.S. Mint.! lol Yet the Mint charges its silver American Eagle bullion coin “Authorized Purchasers” just $2 over the spot price of silver for each coin but price gouges the public on it Numismatic Program coins. Both AP dealers & all of us regular collectors are both U.S. Mint customers & should be treated fairly for our loyalty. The MInt raised prices on three of the sets in… Read more »

Jp

Hmmmm…Me thinks we are not a bunch of “Happy Campers” here United States Mint. Pay attention. Those “Reductions” are truly insulting to say the least.

Jp

Could be worse though…just check out the prices from the Canadian Mint. OUCH!!!!

daactaa

Couldn’t help but notice the $100 liberty gold was exactly $50 more than the $50 buffalo. They just slap a face value on it then collect the real difference from us.

jim

Buying 1 oz of gold in each but paying $50 more for the anorexic liberty coin? The buffalo aside from the price is a much more attractive and historic coin way more worth buying than the anorexic liberty, even without all the scratches, etc.

billymac11

Less packaging, less price, especially on the annual sets. Mint set, especially, should be priced for beginner collectors.

Tinto

@jim
“..the anorexic liberty …”

Yup, I would also add “Listless Liberty” the Mint totally blew it on this one IMO and then they along with others try to hype it to the high heavens (along with a “generous” HH limit to try to engineer a fast sellout .. didn’t happen)

RonnieBGood

FYI:
The law that authorized the minting of the HR Liberty was only for a Gold mintage and never included language for a silver mintage. The mintage of coins are authorized from laws that are written by our state elected officials. The Mint has some flexibility but must produce to the written requirements.

Tinto

@RonnieBGood The Mint’s own news release says that the Secretary of the Treasury was authorized to mint these gold coins under Federal law 31 U.S.C. Section 5112 (i)(4)(C) (got that from the Mint’s website) and from what I read in blogs, etc he can set the mintage of this HR gold coin without having to follow a number given by Congress. Here’s the link to the Mint’s news release. https://www.usmint.gov/pressroom/insidethemint/?action=high-relief-gold-1 I read that the Mint was also going to issue silver medal versions of the gold coins, but I didn’t hear any stuff on the Mint producing silver coins ..… Read more »

Seth Riesling

RonnieBGood & Tinto – You both make good comments on the American Liberty high relief $100 gold coin from last year, but that is not the full story behind the scenes. The only reason it was minted was due to a “deal” made between the U.S. Mint & congressional aides & the members of the U.S. Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee & U.S.Commission of Fine Arts (very powerful advisory people in Washington D.C.) It was not a commemorative coin & not a bullion version coin either & had no special packaging & was only an Uncirculated “business strike” without any special… Read more »

Jp

Numisdude- Wow, now that is a good story! Thanks for the dirt on Liberty. I don’t know where you find this info from, but keep it up! That just tells you how petty people are. I guess the bottom line here is, follow the MONEY! The US Mint is a business. We all complain about the prices and quality etc, but in the end it’s a money making venture. No one is forcing us to buy anything. It’s all a bunch of “shiny metal objects”. I think my kids will appreciate the collection I continue to put together, but after… Read more »

Curious collector

Not sure if this is the right place for this question, but there seem to be some erudite folks on here that might know. So, here goes: What becomes of the unsold non-bullion proof and mint sets and coins that are in them once sales are discontinued? Are they distributed for sale until sold out at the mint gift shops? Are they put into circulation? Are they stored in a vault somewhere? With the exception of the nickel alloy, it seems that you wouldn’t melt cents, dimes, quarters, halves, or dollars because of the expense involved in reformulating and recasting… Read more »

EC

I placed my order ASAP on 4-6-17 for the 2017 W Am Liberty Gold Coin from the US Mint. I am STILL WAITING FOR IT TO BE SHIPPED. The BIG BUSINESS OWNERS HAVE RECEIVED THEIRS. You could say that I am PISSED-OFF. Just like when the SILVER MEDAL came out last year, I ordered asap when it was available, BIG BUSINESS ALWAYS COMES 1st. The US Mint DOES NOT DO FIRST COME FIRST SERVE!!! Sure, I can get the cheap stuff right away. But if you are the little guy GOOD LUCK. I usually need to wait for the US… Read more »