US Gold Coin Prices May Fall; $100 Liberty Returns

by Mike Unser on November 10, 2015 · 6 comments

2015-W $100 American Liberty High Relief Gold Coin in Hand

The once unavailable 2015 $100 American Liberty High Relief Gold Coin has returned for sale. Its price and that of other collectible gold coins may decline on Wednesday.

On Wednesday, Nov. 11, there’s a good chance that the United States Mint will trim prices on its line of collectible gold coins by as much as $50 for every ounce of gold they contain.

The U.S. Mint reduced gold coin prices just last week, on Nov. 4, when the weekly average of London gold sank to within the range of $1,100.00 to $1,149.99 an ounce. The precious metal has tumbled further since, tracking a more than three-month low at around $1,087 an ounce.

If Wednesday’s LBMA gold price for the AM is below $1,124.96 an ounce and the fixing for the PM remains under $1,100 an ounce, expect the following reductions in gold coin prices:

From To
2015-W $100 American Liberty High Relief Gold Coin* $1,540.00 $1,490.00
2015-W Proof Gold Buffalo Coin (1 oz) $1,490.00 $1,440.00
2015-W Uncirculated Gold Eagle Coin (1 oz) $1,425.00 $1,375.00
2015-W Proof Gold Eagle Coin (1 oz) $1,460.00 $1,410.00
2015-W Proof Gold Eagle Coin (1/2 oz) $745.00 $720.00
2015-W Proof Gold Eagle Coin (1/4 oz) $385.00 $372.50
2015-W Proof Gold Eagle Coin (1/10 oz) $165.00 $160.00
2015 US Marshals Proof Gold Coin $381.15 $369.00
2015 US Marshals Uncirculated Gold Coin $376.15 $364.00
2014 & 2015 First Spouse Gold Proof Coins $765.00 $740.00
2014 & 2015 First Spouse Gold Uncirculated Coins $745.00 $720.00

 

The United States Mint has made thirteen previous pricing changes this year, raising them six times and dropping them seven times. Past adjustments have tended to happen on Wednesdays at around 2:00 p.m. ET. This article will get updated with what actually happens.

Update: Coin prices were reduced, though the changes happened around 2:00 p.m. ET on Thursday since the Mint was closed on Wednesday in honor of Veterans Day.

The above gold coins are found on the U.S. Mint’s website page located here.

2015 $100 American Liberty HR Gold Coin Returns

*The U.S. Mint had listed the 2015 American Liberty High Relief Gold Coin as unavailable on Nov. 3. It is available again as of this writing.

Preliminary sales figures for this week have its total up 158 to 45,579. Its mintage maximum is 50,000.

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Joe
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Joe

Are these returned American Liberty coins now on sale?

Tinto
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Tinto

Wonder how many times these $100 were sold, rejected and returned and then put back for sale …..

jim
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jim

It would be nice if the mint website did have a policies and procedures section where questions such as what happens to returned/rejected coins are answered. I’m guessing only the people in the mail room know the real answer.

mrpapageorgio
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mrpapageorgio

The Liberty coins are for sale this morning……….AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAANNDDDDDDDDDDDD it’s gone!

Seth Riesling
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Seth Riesling

Mike Unser –

In reference to the above comments by Joe, Tinto & Jim, could you research our questions about how returned items are handled at the U.S. Mint’s fulfillment center in Memphis, TN. Are any coins or sets returned by “picky” customers or coin dealer “cherrypickers” during the Mint’s 7-day return period due to quality issues/problems resold or destroyed ? This subject would make a great numismatic investigative journalism article by CoinNews.net by Mike Unser, Rhonda (Kay) Unser or Darrin Lee Unser. I am glad the Unser family has the Mint connections & our backs in the area of consumer protection! Thanks for your consideration in this matter & for a great website for both new & experienced numismatists.

-NumisDudeTX

Marvin
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Marvin

I regularly buy a little Gold and some Silver coins primarily as a hedge against unpredictable events. Yesterday I called my coin dealer to order some silver and he stated he had a great deal on the American Liberty High Relief Gold M70 coin. He has always been fair but I feel on this occasion he may have taken advantage in my trust. I paid about $2500 for one of the M70 High Relief. From what I’m reading I may have significantly overpaid. Does anyone have any advice or believe the price was fair? Thanks