2014 Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Medals

by Mike Unser on December 29, 2014 · 10 comments

Not to dismiss its two coins and four stamps, but the gems of the 2014 Franklin D. Roosevelt Coin & Chronicles Set are its medals. And of those, the silver medal shines the brightest in both appearance and appeal.

2014 Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Medals, 2

2014 Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Medals (reverse of silver and obverse of bronze)

Released on Dec. 22, 2014, we’ll talk more about the set in an upcoming article. For now, I wanted to simply present the medals in a photo overview.

2014 Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Medals

Obverse of silver medal and reverse of bronze

Both medals share the same designs, which were created by John R. Sinnock for the 1945 Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Medal. Having seen FDR’s portrait on dimes all my life, it’s not the front of the medals that invoke their greatest appeal — although their larger portraits and contoured backgrounds are definitely more unique.

2014 Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Silver Medal - Obverse

Medal obverses have FDR’s portrait with inscriptions FRANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, and the artist’s initials of J.R.S. The silver medals are composed in on ounce of .999 fine silver to a diameter of 1.598 inches.

2014 Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Bronze Medal - Obverse

The bronze medals are minted in 95% copper and 5% zinc to a diameter of 1.3125 inches.

It’s the medal reverses that steal your attention. They feature a seated figure, representing a sorrowing Nation, dropping a wreath upon the waters. To the side, a ship symbolizing the spirit of the late President, sails into the distant mist.

2014 Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Silver Medal - Reverse

Reverse FDR medal inscriptions include FOR COUNTRY and HUMANITY, INAUGURATED PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, the dates of his four terms (MAR. 4, 1933; JAN. 20, 1937; JAN. 20, 1941; and JAN. 20, 1945), the date of his death, APRIL 12, 1945, and IN MEMORIAM.

2014 Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Bronze Medal - Reverse

Reverse of bronze medal

The 2014 Coin & Chronicles Set isn’t exactly cheap but the medals are a sound reason to spend the $57.95 to get at least one. They are available from the U.S. Mint’s website, right here. They have a product limit of 20,000.

Photo of opened 2014 Franklin D. Roosevelt Coin and Chronicles Set

Opened 2014 FDR Coin and Chronicles Set

{ 10 comments… read them below or add one }

RonnieBGood December 29, 2014 at 10:16 am

I’m going to pass on the tokens/metals set. For the cost this would have been better with an enlarged FDR Dime as a $1 one ounce silver coin (like they did with the Buffalo Nickel). Also would have liked a Gold dime (at normal size as an optional set). This would have been an affordable gold coin and sold well.

Victor DeCurtis December 29, 2014 at 4:27 pm

Back in 1966, just after I was introduced to coin collecting, I received a brochure, from the Philadelphia Mint, showing all the 3″ medals of the presidents and the corresponding 1-5/16″ medallion. I have never regretted buying every one of them and later on I purchased other medals of varied subjects. I went to the Mint, in 1973, and after walking around the mint, on the viewer’s catwalk, I stopped at the mint’s store. Wow, I bought a lot more obscure medals, which I know are no longer minted. Except for Washington, Lincoln and the presidents from Reagan onward, none of the other presidents are minted. I paid .50 cents for each 1-5/16″ medal and $3.00 for each 3″ medal. Now at over $5 for the small ones and $36 for the 3″ medals, I think I did well. I would say, get one or two, just to have a piece of history.

Joe December 29, 2014 at 5:12 pm

JFK will be my next one. The .999 fine silver and low mintage and the rest of it is really sharp.

RonnieBGood December 29, 2014 at 5:57 pm

Victor – The math (an example):
If you paid $3 for a 3″ metal in 1966, after 48 years your total return was 14%. This is approximately 0.29% a year. Still think you have done well?

I’m sure you purchased many after 1966 but even these returns would not have kept up with the annual rate of inflation. The best part is the enjoyment you have received by owning them. As much as we love our collections In the end we hope our collections will turn a profit, for us or for those that we pass them on to.

Victor DeCurtis December 30, 2014 at 12:13 pm

Collecting, to me, is about acquiring sets of coins and medals, for the mere joy and satisfaction of having what others don’t. I didn’t sell them, nor do I have any intention of doing so. However, I’ve had the pleasure of taking a few of them out and showing others who never had any idea, they were once available. Collecting vs stock piling for future sale, is different. I have on several occasions, “sold” coins to a new collector, at cost. Pennies, nickles, dimes, quarters and halves, in jars from change, are a great way to start a new person on his or her way to a journey that will last a lifetime. I “sold” them at cost, meaning, face value. I’m sure when they went home, put the coins into their Whitman folders and looked up the value, they must have thought they hit the mother lode. That’s the same feeling I still get when I find a wheatie on the ground. It’s fun!

J December 30, 2014 at 4:16 pm

The obverse design was created almost a decade before 1945. It wasn’t created for the 1945 Inauguration or Memorial medals.

Joe C. January 4, 2015 at 1:22 pm

Rec’d my FDR sets on friday, Jan 3rd. On inspecting the silver FDR medals, I could not find the silver specs anywhere on the medal. I think 99.9 fine silver should have been marked somewhere on it. Possible on the edge. Other than that, they are very nice sets. I still think the $1.00 coin resembles Ed Herrmann more than FDR. Sad to hear Ed Herrmann passed away a few days ago. He played a very good FDR in the movie.

senior January 4, 2015 at 3:16 pm

I had said I would purchase 1.of the current FDR set but I’m still hanging if I hang too long and loose out I don’t really care.None of this material since the 2001 Buffalo has really hit me.As far as expecting a return few of these offerings have any potential of profit gain.If you are in with a set or two as a collectible great,please don”t fill bank safety deposit boxes with this stuff.

senior January 4, 2015 at 5:03 pm

I had said I would purchase 1 of the current FDR set but I’m still hanging if I hang too long and loose out I don’t really care.None of this material since the 2001 Buffalo has really hit me.As far as expecting a return few of these offerings have any potential of profit gain.If you are in with a set or two as a collectible great but I wouldn’t fill bank safety deposit boxes with this stuff.

senior January 4, 2015 at 5:05 pm

I apologize for the double

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