CAP Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidates

by Mike Unser on September 26, 2014 · 10 comments

Artistic design candidates for the Civil Air Patrol Congressional Gold Medal have been unveiled by the United States Mint and reviewed by the Commission of Fine Arts (CFA) and Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (CCAC).

Civil Air Patrol Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidates

Civil Air Patrol Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidates

Public Law No: 113-108 authorizes a Congressional Gold Medal to honor collectively the World War II members of the Civil Air Patrol (CAP) in recognition of their military service and exemplary record. The law also calls for duplicates in bronze for sale to the public.

In total, 31 design candidates were created. They include 16 for the obverse or heads side and 15 for the reverse or tails side. These designs must be narrowed down to one obverse and one reverse.

The CFA made their recommendations on Sept. 18, preferring obverse design CAP-O-15 and reverse design CAP-R-04. Here are images of the CFA selections:

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-O-15

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-O-15

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-R-04

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-R-04

The CCAC offered up their suggestions on Sept. 23, selecting obverse design CAP-O-14 and reverse design CAP-R-03. They added a motion to remove Act of Congress from obverse and leave the same inscriptions on the reverse. Here are images of the CCAC selections:

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-O-14

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-O-14

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-R-03

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-R-03

After consulting with various parties, reviewing suggestions from the CCAC and CFA, and receiving recommendations from the U.S. Mint, the Treasury Secretary will make the final design selections.

All obverse and reverse candidate designs are shown below. Also included are brief narratives of each as provided by the United States Mint.

Obverse CAP Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidates

While not required by law, artists were given Civil Air Patrol and 1941-1945 as suggested inscriptions. These are included on all obverse designs.

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-O-01

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-O-01

CAP-O-01 – Two Civil Air Patrol (CAP) pilots scan the coastal waters from the cockpit of a Fairchild 24. They are banking to the right to get a clearer view of the ocean.

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-O-02

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-O-02

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-O-03

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-O-03

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-O-04

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-O-04

CAP-O-02, CAP-O-03, and CAP-O-04 – Two CAP volunteers watch the skies. In the background, a tanker is escorted by CAP planes overhead.

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-O-05

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-O-05

CAP-O-05 – Two CAP pilots prepare for a rescue mission.

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-O-06

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-O-06

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-O-07

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-O-07

CAP-O-06 and CAP-O-07 – Two CAP crew members salute and vigilantly observe the skies and coastline.  In the foreground, an armed Stinson 10 scours the coastal water for enemy vessels.

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-O-09

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-O-09

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-O-09A

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-O-09A

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-O-09B

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-O-09B

CAP-O-09, CAP O-09A, and CAP-O-09B – These designs depict three courageous pilots of the CAP during WWII. The five CAP patches are depicted along the bottom of the design, along with the CAP roundel. Design 09 features the CAP single wing emblem, while design 09A features an eagle.

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-O-10

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-O-10

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-O-10A

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-O-10A

CAP-O-10 and CAP-O-10A – These designs depict two CAP pilots. The five patrol patches are depicted along the bottom of the design. Design 10A features an eagle atop the roundel.

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-O-12

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-O-12

CAP-O-12 – Two CAP pilots survey the landscape with a plane surveying the coastline in the background.

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-O-13

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-O-13

CAP-O-13 – Two CAP pilots are seen in profile with a pair of planes flying below.

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-O-14

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-O-14

CAP-O-14 – This design depicts two CAP pilots with the CAP roundel centered above and behind them. The figures are positioned over an armed single-engine CAP aircraft as it lifts off of the runway. The composition’s underlying structure resembles the CAP roundel.

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-O-15

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-O-15

CAP-O-15 – The CAP roundel forms the basis of this design with the propeller shape dividing the space into three equal segments representing the pilots, the support crews, and the CAP mission itself. To the left are two CAP pilots in profile.  To the right, a ground support crew prepares a plane for its mission. The bottom section depicts one of the many important missions undertaken by the CAP.

Reverse CAP Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidates

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-R-01

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-R-01

CAP-R-01 – Three CAP planes fly a coastal mission. The center aircraft is fitted with a 100-pound bomb. A CAP insignia is featured at the top of the design. Inscriptions read Civilian Volunteers Who Flew Combat and Humanitarian Missions and Act of Congress 2014.

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-R-02

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-R-02

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-R-02A

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-R-02A

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-R-03

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-R-03

CAP-R-02, CAP-R-02A, and CAP-R-03 – These designs feature variations on a CAP insignia. Inscriptions read Eyes of the Home Skies and Act of Congress 2014. Designs 2 and 2A feature the additional inscription Civil Air Patrol across the lower banner.

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-R-04

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-R-04

CAP-R-04 – A partial laurel wreath, representing honor and service, surrounds CAP insignias. Inscriptions read Honor, Civilian Volunteers Who Flew Combat & Humanitarian Missions, and Act of Congress 2014.

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-R-05

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-R-05

CAP-R-05 – CAP planes escort a merchant ship to shore. The CAP roundel is depicted at the top of the design. Inscriptions read Civilian Volunteers Who Flew Combat & Humanitarian Missions and Act of Congress 2014.

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-R-06

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-R-06

CAP-R-06 – Two CAP planes fly overhead with the CAP roundel and patrol patches below. The inscriptions read Honor, Civilian Volunteers Who Flew Combat and Humanitarian Missions, and Act of Congress 2014.

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-R-07

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-R-07

CAP-R-07 – This design depicts an eagle holding a scope, reminiscent of the CAP coastal patrol badge. The eagle clutches a branch of oak, symbolizing strength. A CAP plane flies in the background. Inscriptions read Eyes of the Home Skies and Act of Congress 2014.

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-R-08

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-R-08

CAP-R-08 – A stylized eagle clutches a scope, reminiscent of the CAP coastal patrol badge. The design is framed by olive branches, symbolizing unity. Three planes used by the CAP are featured at the bottom of the design. The inscriptions read Eyes of the Home Skies and Act of Congress 2014.

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-R-09

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-R-09

CAP-R-09 – This design depicts a stylized version of the CAP coastal patrol badge. The design is surrounded by laurel, signifying victory. The inscriptions read Eyes of the Home Skies, Civilian Volunteers Who Flew Combat and Humanitarian Missions, and Act of Congress 2014.

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-R-10

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-R-10

CAP-R-10 – A pair of CAP planes fly over a shipping vessel, representing one of the important missions of the CAP. The five CAP mission patches are represented on either side of the design, with the CAP insignia at the base of the design. Inscriptions read Civilian Volunteers Who Flew Combat and Humanitarian Missions, and Act of Congress 2014.

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-R-11

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-R-11

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-R-11A

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-R-11A

CAP-R-11 and CAP-R-11A – These designs portray two armed CAP light aircraft from the point of view of one of the pilots. The planes fly over an oil tanker along the Eastern seaboard. The inscription reads Civilian Volunteers Who Flew Combat and Humanitarian Missions. In design 11, the five CAP active service duty patches are positioned along the top of the rim.

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-R-12

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-R-12

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate - CAP-R-12A

Congressional Gold Medal Design Candidate – CAP-R-12A

CAP-R-12 and CAP-R-12A –These designs are variations of reverses 11 and 11A. Two armed CAP light aircraft fly over an oil tanker along the Eastern Seaboard. The inscription reads Civilian Volunteers Who Flew Combat and Humanitarian Missions. In design 12, the five CAP active service duty patches are positioned along the top of the rim.

{ 10 comments… read them below or add one }

timothy whitling September 27, 2014 at 2:08 am

this run of collectors coins should start a revelation of appreciation.The sooner they are made the better.If they are man made gold I feel the protection coating helps pretty well. thank you,timothy Whitling

GEORGE C MINNICH September 27, 2014 at 11:35 am

After looking over all the samples I agree with the CFA samples at the top of the page. Many of the others are either too busy or cluttered, while many of the others are too simple r do not show enough or other reasons. The O-14/R-04 combination is a good balance.

Percy Newby September 27, 2014 at 12:46 pm

I agree with you George

Audrey Morrow September 27, 2014 at 9:32 pm

I agree with George Minnich. The O-14R-04 is also my choice.

Jay Chastenay September 28, 2014 at 7:39 am

The coin that should not be considered is 013. The aircraft depicted is a 1947 Stinson 108 series aircraft that was not produced during WW2. Additionally, the bomb is mounted aft of the landing gear on the right side of the aircraft. The aircraft that should be depicted is, the Stinson L9B from the left side displaying the aft of the left main gear bomb mount location. As a matter of technical accuracy the bomb was mounted in that location due to a physical hard point which accommodated the third seat that was removed and was an optimum location for the bomb to maintain correct CG,

Randall Broussard, Capt. CAP September 28, 2014 at 9:06 pm

O-14/R-04 is also my choice.

Richard Hogsett September 29, 2014 at 4:08 pm

Well, the CFA samples were O-15/R-04 but I agree with the O-14/R-04 choice.

Ralph B Welder (Bruce) October 1, 2014 at 9:43 pm

My favorite combination would be O-06 or O-07 (the only difference I can see is the face of the woman)/R-04. The second best reverse would be R-09.

Stephen Patti Col CAP WWii vet October 4, 2014 at 2:46 pm

As a wwii cap vet I like O-15 and R-14 .O-15 also represents the ground support teams.

anna kerr November 10, 2014 at 7:31 pm

I’m a former Civil Air patrol cadet and senior officer of the 1980’s I think all former members from WW2 up to today all deserve a medal like this. I didn’t get to go to the service because of me being to light and disqualified from military service. I didn’t want to sit by and do nothing either so my Airforce recuiter said C.A.P. will take you and they did. I gave four years of volunteer service

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