Last Call for 2012 Commemorative Coins and September 11 National Medals

by Mike Unser on December 14, 2012 · 2 comments

Monday, December 17, 2012 is the last day to buy 2012 commemorative coins and 2011 September 11 National Medals from the United States Mint. The U.S. Mint must receive orders by 5:00 p.m. ET on the 17th to be accepted.

2012 Commemorative Coins and September 11 National Medals

Proof 2012 Commemorative Coins and September 11 National Medal

Authorizing laws stipulated December 31, 2012 as the ending sales date for the commemorative coins and the ending production date for the September 11 National Medals. The U.S. Mint earlier this year announced the cutoff date to permit time for processing and fulfilling final orders.

A listing follows for the eleven products going off sale. Included are U.S. Mint product prices, authorized mintages and current sales as of December 10, 2012. CoinNews.net articles about the products are found by following the links in the "Release Dates" column.

2012 Star-Spangled Banner Commemorative Coins

  Release Dates Price Latest
Sales
Mintages
$5 Proof Gold Coin March 5, 2012 $522.15 6,184 100,000 gold; 500,000 silver max
$5 Uncirculated Gold Coin $512.15 6,553
Proof Silver Dollar $54.95 115,543
Uncirculated Silver Dollar $49.95 40,946
Proof Two-Coin Set $572.15 11,668
Bicentennial Silver Dollar Set June 1, 2012 $53.95 38,344

2012 Infantry Soldier Silver Dollar Commemorative Coins

  Release Dates Price Latest Sales Mintages
Proof Silver Dollar February 16, 2012 $54.95 109,623 202,617 of 350,000
Uncirculated Silver Dollar $49.95 43,863
Defenders of Freedom Set $51.95 49,131

2011 September 11 National Medals

  Release Dates Price Latest Sales Mintages
West Point Mint Mark June 20, 2011 $66.95 108,764 176,342 of 2 million
Philadelphia Mint Mark 67,578

 

Orders for the commemorative coins and medals are accepted through the U.S. Mint website at www.usmint.gov or by calling 1-800-USA-MINT (872-6468).

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Griffin December 14, 2012 at 11:30 am

I wish we could have a commemorative set of coins for the Masonic organizations. Freemasons have been a contributing part of history for well over 500 years and the U.S. has had 15 presidents who were Masons. Currently there are over a million of us around the world. So it is safe to say if just the members of masonic lodges bought one, sales would be well over 500,000.

Any other Masons out there agree with me?

Homer December 18, 2012 at 4:02 pm

Quite interesting how mintages keep getting lower. In spite of low mintages people look to possible lower future mintages. It seems like a heard mentality. No one knows what it means, but everyone is looking for explanations and people cling to what seems like the best one. I think things happen so quickly now with the internet. Coins are buried as dead while they are still on sale. The SSB $5 UNC looked like it was going to be the lowest minted $5 modern commem and over 1500 are sold in a very short time. I am sure a lot of them will probably be cancelled after the mintage which is still low, jumped so quickly. So mintage could still end up a lot lower. It is peoples lack of perspective which is driving actions. A lot of coins in the past took a while before they took off. I look at the 2012 San Franciso set as a good example. It has been declared as dead and it sells for close to issues price in spite of two low minted Eagles in the set. They released one of the coins in another set, but mintage is still low for that one. It seems like most of the people in blogs are just looking for quick profits. Precious metals prices are historically high right now which limits mintages. If metal prices dropped cosiderably, mintages would be a lot higher. In the long run, this is a good time to buy coins from a mintage standpoint. I think if people take a more long term perspective and they have patience, they will be rewarded. Ultimately, the popularity of the coin will determine the demand. If no one likes a design, demand may always be low regardless of mintage as well.

Leave a Comment