1983 Cent Mistakenly Struck on Bronze Planchet Featured at GreatCollections Auction

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The finest 1983 Lincoln Cent, mistakenly struck on a bronze planchet, is being auctioned by GreatCollections on Sunday, July 28th, with bidding already up to $8,250.

1983 Lincoln Cent Struck on Bronze Planchet
1983 Lincoln Cent Struck on Bronze Planchet

1983 Lincoln Cents are most notable for their major Doubled Die variety, which can fetch hundreds of dollars – but Transitional Errors also exist, where an incorrect planchet is used. In this case, it was struck on a planchet that was left over from 1982 or earlier. GreatCollections has sold two circulated examples over the past decade at $3,900 and $4,050 each.

"What’s fascinating about this transitional Lincoln Cent is the high grade – PCGS MS-65 RD – we believe it is the finest known by a wide margin and also appears to be the sole example graded by PCGS, the leading grading service for Lincoln Cents and varieties," said Ian Russell, president of GreatCollections.

Another famous Transitional Lincoln Cent is the 1943, also struck in Bronze, although commonly referred to as a "1943 Copper Cent", which should have been struck in steel. These can sell for hundreds of thousands of dollars or more when they appear in auction, even in lower grades. The last example to appear in a GreatCollections auction realized $298,125 in November 2022, which was graded PCGS AU-50 with CAC approval. Transitionals also exist on 1965 dimes and quarters, being struck in silver, when they should have been struck in clad.

The continued presence and new discoveries of these cents in circulation adds to their allure and popularity among roll hunters, making them a popular segment of collecting.

The Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS) recently graded the 1983 Lincoln Cent as Bronze after conducting an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer test on the coin to accurately determine the metal content of the planchet, combined with its weight of 3.1 grams.

1983 Lincoln Cent Struck on Bronze Planchet 3.1g PCGS MS-65 RD
1983 Lincoln Cent Struck on Bronze Planchet 3.1g PCGS MS-65 RD

GreatCollections has auctioned some of the most valuable Lincoln Cents ever sold, including the finest 1958 Lincoln Cent with a Doubled Die Obverse, graded MS-65 Red by PCGS, that achieved a record-breaking sale price of $1.13 million. Additionally, a 1969-S Lincoln Cent, also with a Doubled Die Obverse and certified by PCGS as MS-66 RD (CAC), realized $601,875.

The 1983 Lincoln Cent Struck in Bronze is currently listed at GreatCollections, with bidding to end on Sunday, July 28th. To find out more, visit www.greatcollections.com or telephone 1-800-442-6467.

How can you find your own Transitional Lincoln Cent?

Regular issue 1983 Lincoln Cents should weigh 2.5 grams, whereas Transitional Copper and Bronze planchets weigh 3.11 grams (give or take 0.13 grams).

  1. The diameter of a normal Lincoln cent is 19.05mm
  2. The thickness of a normal Lincoln cent is 1.55mm
  3. Both Copper and Bronze planchets weigh 3.11 grams (+/- 0.13g)
  4. A Zinc planchet weighs 2.5 grams (+/- 0.10g)
  5. A Steel planchet weighs 2.7 grams

About GreatCollections

GreatCollections, the official auction house of the American Numismatic Association, specializes in auctioning certified coins and banknotes, handling transactions from start to finish. Since its founding in 2010, GreatCollections has successfully auctioned over 1.5 million certified coins, making it one of the leading certified coin companies in the United States with annual sales in 2023 exceeding $210 million. Ian Russell, owner/president of GreatCollections, is a member of the prestigious Professional Numismatists Guild, member of the National Auctioneers Association and was recently named the ANA Harry J. Forman Dealer of the Year. For more information about GreatCollections, visit www.greatcollections.com or call 800-442-6467.

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E 1

Maybe I should buy a precision gram scale. I have a bunch of 83s in gem.

Rick

Not a bad idea,
While I bypass many other potential 1C errors & varieties while mining for copper, I do set those ’83s aside right next to the(cheap)scale.

E 1

You know what?

This was a great article.

This is the kind of stuff I like to see.

Cheers

Kaiser Wilhelm

Exactly, E 1. This is what I like to call coin education. Besides, I absorbed the term “Transitional” coins thus fulfilling my numismatic nutrition needs for the day.

Rick

E1,

It’s only a guess, but I would bet that your Dansco Album, page 1 in particular–has higher quality coins within?

https://www.greatcollections.com/Coin/1611476/1964–2011-Kennedy-Half-Dollar-Collection-Uncertified-in-Dansco-Album-159-Coins

E 1

Rick, I have a Kennedy Dansco 7166 with a slip case. It includes the last update page that carries the set out to 2028. The album is for the Business Strikes only. No proofs. It is a complete Gem P&D set. Very heavy and really nice. It’s wrapped up and in a box. I will try and get it out for you later. I was planning on Publlishing some photos after I get the 2024 mint set updates in August. It was built from rolls and mint sets over the years. All the proofs and the varieties are in slabs… Read more »

Rick

E1,
No worries on that at all. Break the Album out when you add to it later and we’ll admire it whenever it’s convenient for you.
Come to think of it, I have seen some of your graded Cameo’s, Proofs, and MS coins before. And as AKBob says, “Both you & E1 talking about the Kennedy’s has sparked my interest and has given me the itch”…
I know exactly how he feels now don’t I?
Sometimes, no matter the coin, stamp, art, car, or girly. A spark is all it takes to ignite the flame……

Kaiser Wilhelm

“Sometimes, no matter the coin, stamp, art, car, or girly. A spark is all it takes to ignite the flame……”

Rick, you’ve just provided me with another “plaque” to hang on the wall of my mind, and while it may be a longer than usual one it’s a great one!

Tony@GA

Don’t look now folks! The silver Brittiania Liberty is back on sale at the new LOW price!! Just in time for those that paid to have em slabbed when the honorable Ventris said they were sold out. But don’t worry… the more sold the lower the price in the end???? This is why the mint will always win no matter if you buy or don’t buy… they’ll just sell them for upteen dozen years on end. And staying true to the article the 1983 Penny – I’ve searched for years for this one in the wild and haven’t got one… Read more »

Rick

Huh, I had to check it out for myself. Unreal. I swear that after 30 days they were declared sold out. Did the US Mint lie to us?
And of course, the Marketing has officially begun for the ‘Comical Coins’…
Take the survey–The Ultimate Mint to DC ‘Crossover’ has officially begun Cali….

https://catalog.usmint.gov/comic-art/

Last edited 10 days ago by Rick
East Coast Guru

I had no idea this cent existed. Huh, well time to go back and look through my pennies.

Kaiser Wilhelm

Don’t fall for it for a second, East Coast Guru. This is just too obviously a nationwide conspiracy on the part of optometrists to drive up their lagging business.

Major D

No need for anyone to look, I’m sure I have the other one in my jar.

Kaiser Wilhelm

Major D and East Coast Guru,

No need to fret if you can’t find the 1983 Bronze Transitional Cent through regular channels. The Peoples’ Exact Same Wuhan Mint is cranking them out as we speak.

Kaiser Wilhelm

Dedicated Wuhan Mint Employees…

China2_1580013090811_1581008341964
E 1

Rick,

I received the 42-S today. I will not be dipping this coin. It looks to good and its a bit chrome like. Like you said, those small scratches are on the holder. Straight to the album it goes.

Cheers

IMG_0772-Copy
Rick

Nice coin and great eye for the upgrade sleeper E1.✓
The toning is mild enough, chrome is a good descriptive.
Congratulations! It’s going to be a killer Album when complete, I already know it.
I’ve been looking at scratched holders a lot recently looking for the clean sleeper coin underneath(think Kennedy’s). Deals are to be had like yours above, especially researching with multiple photo sources from;
1) The seller.
2) A TPG.
3) A past auction photo shoot if available.

E 1

Thanks Rick.

Kaiser Wilhelm

Once again, E 1, you are responsible for the drool on my laptop.

E 1

Kaiser,

Just don’t get any of it on the surfaces of your coins.

Thanks Kaiser.

All Good

Kaiser Wilhelm

E 1,

I will be sure to keep that very sound and timely bit of advice at the forefront of my mind. No overly excessive drooling on my coins. Got it!

And by the way, you’re very welcome.

E 1

Rick,

Here is page 1 of the 7166. I’ve had these coins for a very long time. Not to exciting and not worth much either. Maybe $400.This is just an archival set. Just so I have one of every business strike in BU. Again, not to exciting. But very interesting as you can see how the mint’s minting technology had progressed over 60 years. Very heavy and a lot of coins.

Cheers

IMG_0774-Copy
E 1

We must be the only ones posting pictures of our coins.

Rick

Still yet, a pretty cool Kennedy set. I’m new to seeing those albums not being around them early on, or later. VinnieC showed us his toned bullion and Major D with proof sets. But many more in hand photos would be nice. They all have great coins, our friends here, I know it. Maybe it’s a pain for most, but if the coins are handy and after some posting practice, it’s not bad. Besides, some collections are sealed and put up for the duration.. I’m waiting to see some 1800’s $1 and $3 Gold coins. I know some guys lurking… Read more »

Last edited 10 days ago by Rick
E 1

Rick, On the coin album front…..Everything in a nut shell. You will find that the album market is very different from the conventional certified coin market. Albums don’t photograph well and therefore don’t sell well online either. The best places to buy a completed album is: at a show, at an LCS, from an estate sale, or at a high-end auction house like Christies or Stacks & Bowers. Sometimes, before auction, all of the coins will be carefully removed from the album and certified. The empty album will also be included in the auction for reasons of provenance. Sometimes, provenance… Read more »

Rick

E1,
That’s a great read. Thank you very much for that.
Collector 101 right there.
A couple of takeaways and I’ve got to go-I’m sleepy eyed at the moment. I’ll follow up again tomorrow. But first;
A few Coin Collecting Traits that I’ve keyed in on :
1) Commitment and dedication.
2) Research and education.
3) Focused and orderly.
4) Quality.
5) Instinct.
6) Discipline.
7) Passion.
8) Patience.
9) Respect.
10) Experience.

1 through 10 = An Expert, and his name is E1.
Beer, Baked Beans, and Coins = Sanity.
A Happy Coin Club Member

E 1

Rick,

Thank you for your sincerely kind and highly sane reply.

I am grateful.

Cheers Bro

E 1

Here is a good example.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/115500313140

No 1922 Plain. Only missing one coin.

Rick

Now that is impressive, wow gem galore! I bet that over time, as more become broken up and dismantled, that its valuation can only go up. Do you have a Lincoln Album?(yeah I remember seeing satin cents?) I saw your library a while back, you had 6-7 albums? If I were to get an Album, it might be the Walkers, but looks tough as nails to assemble a quality set. I would want to assemble it myself for the challenge.. Look at this one below. The 20’s were a challenge for this guy. Same with most of the S coins.… Read more »

E 1

Rick, Just try to build the entire Walker Set (1916-1947) in PCGS MS-65. The teens and the twenties would break the bank. Not forgetting how long it would take to build. The Short Set (1941-1947) in high grade is attainable and a great numismatic experience. Better yet, a complete run of proof Walkers (1936-1942) in high grade would be a worthwhile accomplishment. Especially with cameo designations. IMO, an absolute thing of beauty and so blindly overlooked. The ASE program drew hundreds of millions of dollars away from the Walker Series. It tricked me too and now I know the truth.… Read more »

Kaiser Wilhelm

E 1,

I will state this essay is even beyond your typically brilliant material. I feel I’ve received a full-fledged intro to coin album buying.

Last edited 9 days ago by Kaiser Wilhelm
E 1

Kaiser,

Yes, it has been a great semester.

All my Best

Tony@GA

All of my problems chase’s the last several years are in the original unopened mint packages.

As to my older stuff…. Ever since the boating accident I can’t find them anymore…

They glistened in the sun against the water… hate I lost them all.

Tony@GA

“All of my new purchases”

E 1

There have been a number of those reported boating accidents around here. I think I may have had a boating accident or two.

Kaiser Wilhelm

E 1 and Tony@GA,

Both of my “boating accidents” with coins can be attributed to the progression of calamitously fatal attractions to a couple of woefully feral females that resulted in my precipitously dumping two successive collections for cash in transactions that were about as well thought out as a wienie roast in a firecracker warehouse. Five to ten cents on the dollar if I was lucky!

Rick

I know you have nice coins put up, kudos for the gonads to resist opening✓
Same here, I was devastated when I found out that my sealed, buried treasure hoard was looted right down to my last Charizard Pokemon Card.

Kaiser Wilhelm

The will power to leave Mint packages unopened long term, Tony@GA, is a facility that I’m not at all familiar with.