Heritage’s June HKINF World Coin and Paper Money Auctions Top $10.6 Million

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Two gold Chinese coins celebrating notable scientific inventions sold for $816,000 each to lead Heritage’s HKINF World & Ancient Coins Platinum Session and Signature® Auction – Hong Kong to $8,398,056 June 19-21. Heritage’s HKINF World Paper Money Signature® Auction – Hong Kong reached $2,231,089 June 18-21, boosting the total from the events to $10,629,145.

People's Republic gold Proof _Compass_ 2000 Yuan (1 Kilo) 1992 PR69 Ultra Cameo NGC
People’s Republic gold Proof Compass 2000 Yuan (1 Kilo) 1992 PR69 Ultra Cameo NGC

Sharing top-lot honors were a People’s Republic gold Proof "Compass" 2000 Yuan (1 Kilo) 1992 PR69 Ultra Cameo NGC and a People’s Republic gold Proof "Seismography" 2000 Yuan (1 Kilo) 1992 PR68 Ultra Cameo NGC from the Scientific Inventions and Discoveries Series of Ancient China Series, each of which comes from a minute mintage of just 10 pieces.

People's Republic gold Proof _Seismography_ 2000 Yuan (1 Kilo) 1992 PR68 Ultra Cameo NGC
People’s Republic gold Proof Seismography 2000 Yuan (1 Kilo) 1992 PR68 Ultra Cameo NGC

"These coins celebrate enormously important inventions that are used today and are a significant part of the foundation of numerous areas of scientific study," says Cris Bierrenbach, Executive Vice President at Heritage Auctions. "The items pictured on these coins represented a massive leap in technological discovery, and it is only appropriate that they are depicted on the magnificent coins sold in this auction."

A People’s Republic gold Proof "Guanyin Bodhisattva" 1500 Yuan 1993 PR69 Ultra Cameo NGC soared past its pre-auction estimates before closing at $432,000. This magnificent coin also is exceedingly rare, from a mintage of just 30; this event marked its first appearance at auction in at least two decades.

People's Republic gold Proof _Guanyin Bodhisattva_ 1500 Yuan 1993 PR69 Ultra Cameo NGC
People’s Republic gold Proof "Guanyin Bodhisattva" 1500 Yuan 1993 PR69 Ultra Cameo NGC

More than a dozen bids poured in for a Republic Tsao Kun gold Dollar ND (1923) MS62 NGC until it ended at $192,000. This Dollar-sized gold issue, requisitioned by Republic of China President Tsau Kun upon the promulgation of the new Constitution by the Peking Senate in 1923, portrays the warlord and politician in military uniform. This was the first time Heritage has brought this Chinese rarity to auction in nearly a decade.

Republic Tsao Kun gold Dollar ND (1923) MS62 NGC
Republic Tsao Kun gold Dollar ND (1923) MS62 NGC

Also crushing pre-auction estimates was a Republic Yuan Shih-kai "Plumed Hat" Dollar ND (1916) MS64+ PCGS that was struck for the inauguration of Yuan Shih-Kai as Emperor Hung-hsein and drew a winning bid of $180,000. His imperial reign as emperor was brief, but those issues struck in commemoration of the event remain a target of the most serious collectors, especially examples in such exquisite condition.

Republic Yuan Shih-kai "Plumed Hat" Dollar ND (1916
Republic Yuan Shih-kai “Plumed Hat” Dollar ND (1916

One of the rarities from the Sun Yat-sen series, a Republic Sun Yat-sen Specimen Pattern 1/2 Dollar (50 Cents) Year 25 (1936) SP63 PCGS finished at $168,000. Whether these issues were struck at the San Francisco Mint or the Central Mint of Shanghai (Kann purporting the latter) has been the subject of some debate, but what is known is the fact that the specimen offered in this auction carries the second-highest grade at PCGS, with none graded higher at NGC.

Republic Sun Yat-sen Specimen Pattern 1_2 Dollar (50 Cents) Year 25 (1936) SP63 PCGS
Republic Sun Yat-sen Specimen Pattern 1/2 Dollar (50 Cents) Year 25 (1936) SP63 PCGS

A Republic Sun Yat-sen silver Specimen British Pattern "Junk" Dollar Year 18 (1929) SP64 PCGS climbed to $120,000. Struck from British mint-made dies, it is a sought-after and difficult Pattern to locate from the entire Chinese series. This issue is coveted by advanced collectors, especially in this exceptional, near-Gem state of preservation, and is topped by just three other examples.

Other top results included, but were not limited to:

$108,000: a Hsüan-t’ung Specimen Pattern 50 Cents Year 3 (1911) UNC Details (Cleaned) PCGS

$108,000: a Kiangnan. Kuang-hsü Dollar ND (1897) UNC Details (Cleaned) PCGS

$102,000: a Hsüan-t’ung silver Pattern Dollar ND (1910) MS63 PCGS

$102,000: a Qing Dynasty. Wen Zong (Xian Feng) 1000 Cash ND (May-August 1854) Certified 90 by Gong Bo Grading

$102,000: a Republic Sun Yat-sen silver Specimen Italian Pattern "Junk" Dollar Year 18 (1929)-R UNC Details (Cleaned) PCGS

$102,000: a People’s Republic brass Proof Pattern "Great Wall Panda" 100 Yuan 1982 PR69 Ultra Cameo NGC

Complete results can be found at HA.com/3117.

World Paper Money

Leading the World Paper Money auction was a China Hupeh Government Mint 1 Dollar = 7 Mace 2 Candareens 1899 Pick S2135 S/M#p75-20 PMG Choice Extremely Fine 45 that more than doubled its pre-auction estimate when it sold for $50,400 after drawing more than a dozen bids.

Hupeh Vertical Dollar
Hupeh Vertical Dollar

"This is an exceptional note, both in physical size and state of preservation, so it is no surprise that it was pursued so aggressively," says Dustin Johnston, Vice President of Numismatics at Heritage Auctions. "Because it could be exchanged for a crown-sized silver dollar, the vast majority of them were redeemed long ago, making this an unquestioned prize within its new collection. These notes have long been prized among collectors, and this is the finest problem-free example."

Part of the lone issue by the Hupeh Government Mint, this example is the second-finest, and one of the few original pieces, of just 36 examples graded in the PMG Population Report.

A China People’s Bank of China 500 Yuan 1949 Pick 843a S/M#C282-55 PMG Superb Gem Unc 67 EPQ drew a dozen bids before closing at $38,400. The magnificent example in this auction, with an industrial steam shovel vignette featured on the front, is tied for the highest-graded in the PMG Population Report.

China People's Bank of China 500 Yuan 1949 Pick 843a S_M#C282-55 PMG Superb Gem Unc 67 EPQ
China People’s Bank of China 500 Yuan 1949 Pick 843a S/M#C282-55 PMG Superb Gem Unc 67 EPQ

An elusive China People’s Bank of China 1000 Yuan 1949 Pick 849a S/M#C282-60 PMG Gem Uncirculated 66 EPQ drew a winning bid of $28,800. Exceedingly scarce and highly collectible, this note features a harvesting scene with a donkey cart as the central design. No finer examples are listed in the PMG Population Report.

China People's Bank of China 1000 Yuan 1949 Pick 849a
China People’s Bank of China 1000 Yuan 1949 Pick 849a

Two exceptional notes, an India Government of India, Lahore or Calcutta 20 Rupees 30.11.1905 Pick A14d PMG Very Fine 20 and a Hong Kong Hongkong & Shanghai Banking Corp. 10 Dollars 1.4.1893 Pick 143 KNB34a-f PMG Choice Fine 15, each ended at $26,400. The 20 Rupees note is one of the rarest denominations in India’s uniface series. This example, featuring the city of issue/redemption of Calcutta and Lahore, is one of just three examples present in the PMG Population Report and the first ever offered at Heritage Auctions. The Hong Kong & Shanghai Banking Corporation 10 is notoriously rare: PMG has graded just five examples of all known dates from 1893-98.

Calcutta 20 Rupees 30.11.1905 Pick A14d PMG Very Fine 20
Calcutta 20 Rupees 30.11.1905 Pick A14d PMG Very Fine 20

Two beautiful Chinese notes, a Pei Yang Tientsin Bank 3 Dollars ND (ca. 1910) Pick S2527 S/M#P35-11 PMG Gem Uncirculated 66 EPQ and a Land Bank of China Ltd., Shanghai 1 Yuan 1.6.1931 Pick 504 S/M#C285-10 PMG Gem Uncirculated 66 EPQ, each brought $25,200. The Pei Yang 3 is a popular type note, one of the most beautiful of all Bradbury, Wilkinson & Company designs, examples of which generally are rare, especially in the best collector grades. All notes in this series are considered Remainders, and only one example is graded higher in the PMG Population Report. The Shanghai 1 Yuan also is an exceptional example, with just one grading higher in the PMG Population Report. The Land Bank of China issued banknotes in two series: 1926 and 1931 — each with a small print total.

Hong Kong Hongkong & Shanghai Banking Corp. 10 Dollars
Hong Kong Hongkong & Shanghai Banking Corp. 10 Dollars

Other top lots included, but were not limited to:

$24,000: a Malaya and British Borneo Board of Commissioners of Currency 10,000 Dollars ND (1953) Pick 7cts Color Trial Specimen PMG Choice About Unc 58 EPQ

Malaya and British Borneo Board of Commissioners of Currency 10,000 Dollars ND (1953) Pick 7cts Color Trial Specimen PMG Choice About Unc 58 EPQ
Malaya and British Borneo Board of Commissioners of Currency 10,000 Dollars ND (1953) Pick 7cts Color Trial Specimen PMG Choice About Unc 58 EPQ

$21,600: a Philippines Philippine National Bank 100 Pesos 1920 Pick 50 PMG Very Fine 20

$21,600: a Singapore Board of Commissioners of Currency 10,000 Dollars ND (1973) Pick 8A PMG Extremely Fine 40

Singapore Board of Commissioners of Currency 10,000 Dollars ND (1973) Pick 8A PMG Extremely Fine 40
Singapore Board of Commissioners of Currency 10,000 Dollars ND (1973) Pick 8A PMG Extremely Fine 40

$21,600: a Hong Kong Chartered Bank of India, Australia & China 5 Dollars 1.9.1923 Pick 47 KNB22 PMG Very Fine 20

$20,400: a Macau Banco Nacional Ultramarino 100 Patacas ND (ca. 1906) Pick 6Acts Color Trial Specimen PMG Choice About Unc 58

Complete results can be found at HA.com/4051.

About Heritage Auctions

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, Chicago, Palm Beach, London, Paris, Amsterdam, Brussels, Hong Kong and Tokyo.

Heritage also enjoys the highest Online traffic and dollar volume of any auction house on earth (source: SimilarWeb and Hiscox Report). The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has more than 1,750,000 registered bidder-members and searchable free archives of more than 6,000,000 past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos. Reproduction rights routinely granted to media for photo credit.

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Rick

A crossover story…About a month ago Rick said; “So in short, here is what I have going on with my 4 coins submitted to PCGS for an ANACS(x3)crossover. And an NGC(x1)crossover service. The Jury is still out on all of these coins… All 4 coins are about to be revealed as to what they will, or will not display on their new holder–if even granted a new holder that is(the 3 “V” coins are subject to crossover rejection, and returned in the orig ANACS holder(s)FYI)… Line 1: ANACS MS66RD “V” 1C..I requested a matching grade.(no risk) Line 2: ANACS MS67RD… Read more »

CROSSOVER-COINS-1
Rick

So I have a couple of takeaways. I was hopeful for all coins to cross, and not too surprised that those two ‘V’ coins did not. After all, especially the MS68 V to be the ”Very First MS68” in their database? And they got it from ANACS? Nada. They want to be the one to fully accept a raw coin on its own merits, to grade it from scratch, and of course–to their superior standards. Not another TPG. Especially ANACS-the forced outcast TPG now. To give another TPG/Competitor your stamp of approval on the grade is sort of like showing… Read more »

CROSSOVER-COINS-2
Last edited 19 days ago by Rick
Kaiser Wilhelm

Rick,
My favorite part was the explanation as to why neither the ANACS 67 or 68 were granted crossovers by PCGS. They can’t lower their drawbridge for just anybody!

Major D

You’re the Crossover King, Rick! I mean that as a high compliment. Thanks for sharing your submissions and the results.

Kaiser Wilhelm

It’s possible Rick is more than “just” the Crossover King, Major D; he’s ventured far enough into grading territory to be Emperor of Encapsulation!

Kaiser Wilhelm

Of course, with all the information, observations and advice E 1 adds to the discussions in that regard, we likely have Co-Emperors!

REB

“Emperor of Encapsulation!”

LOL.

Kaiser Wilhelm

REB,
Just occurred to me that’s reminiscent of the Tyrant Collection.

Rick

REB,
On the other hand, I could also be considered a…
“Slave of Encapsulation!”

SLAB-JOKE
Rick

Thanks, now everybody settle down. It may not seem like it, but this is my first rodeo doing this. There will be more crosswalking and/or jaywalking activities depending on the outcomes? There’s more going on as we speak. So more ‘stories’ coming up!
I’m happy to oblige and share these little ventures, tips, and lessons learned. It makes for good coin talk?
So stay tuned, and perhaps benefit later from my being a crash test dummy…
I either make it for the next test, or retire quietly in the ”parts department”!

E 1

Rick,

This is not the best place to discuss inferential statistics in detail. However, I generated these histograms based upon the Extra V population numbers. Hopefully, they will provide some additional insight. As for the two ANACs coins that did not cross, I have these recommendations: 1 – put them back and forget about them, 2 – Try your luck with NGC, 3 – Sell them on the bay with a Buy It Now price you find acceptable.

V_Distribution-Copy
E 1

If you want to become a high-end coin dealer or a high-end coin collector, it is always best to focus on the upper echelon of the coin supply, as it has the highest liquidity. Simply, to acquire the right coins in the right grade. Coins that are rare by mintage and/or rare by condition – should always be your guiding maxim. One should also strive for coins that are appropriate for the grade, at the top of the grade, or better than the encapsulated grade. Any historical mintage claim as to the coin’s rarity or scarcity should also have weight… Read more »

E 1

Now your knowledge should be equal to mine.

You’re an expert.

Cheers

Rick

Thanks E1, Masterfully laid out, comprehensive, and easy on the eyes and ears-so to speak. I just may copy that for future reference. Great advice on what to look for, and what to avoid. The Industry advancements–all of it! One day, I may fully implement those guidelines and maxims and have an equal knowledge base, but I doubt it. I’m late to the party my friend. I use several of those tips, just never all at once unfortunately. But you never know, there’s always room for improvement. An enthusiastic learner? Sure. An Expert? No, and that isn’t my goal necessarily.… Read more »

1976-S-SILVER-KENNEDY-MS69-1
Last edited 18 days ago by Rick
VinnieC

I just wish I knew how to reliably grade coins myself to PCGS grading standards, even at an 80% level. That way I could select what OGP coins to submit and what to attempt a crossover.
I mentioned before My MS-64 and MS-66 ANACS Extra V have black spots when looking under the microscope. I don’t think they would crossover for an equal grade. I’ve seen some PCGS pennies with lower than MS-64 that I thought had spots.

Major D

You and me both, VinnieC. I really want to start immersing myself in the fine art of grading. There’s a trip to the used bookstore in the near future to buy whatever books on the subject I can find. I’ve found a number of useful web sites, but I’d really like to have a good book if I can get one.

VinnieC

BTW, Nice job Rick!

Rick

✔️!

Kaiser Wilhelm

Nice looking coins, but they’re from the counterfeiting capital of the world. No thanks.

Major D

Kaiser, if you change your mind, you can place your on-demand order anytime. The factory and prison labor are on stand-by.

Kaiser Wilhelm

In that precise regard and context, Major D, I never cease to be amazed that a handful of rulers are able to control the fate of the billions of souls on the planet.

Major D

I must say though- I do like the size of the coins as they appear on my computer screen. I wouldn’t mind having a set of 5-inch diameter saucers plates.

Last edited 19 days ago by Major D
Kaiser Wilhelm

Theres actually a joke in how you just put it, Major D. When you’re getting ready to serve tea to your coin club you say “I think I’ll use my fine “China” today.”

Peoples-Republic-gold-Proof-_Seismography_-2000-Yuan-1-Kilo-1992-PR68-Ultra-Cameo-NGC