2024-W Proof American Gold Eagles Available in Four Sizes and Set

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Fractional gold coins take center stage today as the United States Mint unveils four differently sized 2024-W Proof American Gold Eagles, alongside a set containing all four coins. The sizes include 1 oz., 1/2 oz., 1/4 oz., and 1/10 oz., each with corresponding denominations of $50, $25, $10, and $5.

US Mint image four-coin set 2024-W Proof American Gold Eagles
U.S. Mint image of their four-coin set of 2024-W Proof American Gold Eagles. Along with the set, each of the four coins is available for purchase separately.

Proof coins are known for their frosted design elements set against mirror-like backgrounds. These newest coins by the U.S. Mint represent numismatic versions of its immensely popular bullion American Gold Eagle program.

Coin Designs

American Gold Eagles made their first appearance in 1986, featuring Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ iconic depiction of Liberty on the obverse (heads side). This design, originally seen on the $20 gold coins minted from 1907 to 1933, has remained a favorite among collectors ever since.

Image of obverse 2024-W $50 Proof American Gold Eagle
Obverse (heads side) imagery of the gold coins

Recognizing the significance of the design, the U.S. Mint introduced a refreshed version of the image for the 35th anniversary of the program in 2021. Leveraging historical artifacts and modern-day technology, the Mint created an enhanced version to better capture Saint-Gaudens’ original vision.

Each coin features obverse inscriptions including "LIBERTY" and "2024," along with a "W" indicating that the coin was produced at the U.S. Mint’s facility in West Point.

In addition to the refreshed obverse image in 2021, the U.S. Mint introduced a completely new reverse (tails side) design that same year, which continues on this year’s line-up. The new artwork offers a detailed close-up of an eagle’s head and was created by Jennie Norris, a designer from the U.S. Mint’s Artistic Infusion Program (AIP), and sculpted by Mint Medallic Artist Renata Gordon.

Image of reverse 2024-W $50 Proof American Gold Eagle
Reverse (tails side) imagery of the gold coins

Reverse inscriptions include "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA," "E PLURIBUS UNUM," and "IN GOD WE TRUST." The design also includes the artists’ initials, the coin’s legal tender face value, and its precious metal weight.

American Eagle Gold Specifications

$50 $25 $10 $5
Composition 22 Karat Gold (91.67% Gold
3.0% Silver
Balance Copper)
Weight 1.0909 troy oz.
(33.931 grams)
0.5455 troy oz.
(16.966 grams)
0.2727 troy oz.
(8.483 grams)
.1091 troy oz.
(3.393 grams)
Diameter 1.287 inches
(32.70 mm)
1.063 inches
(27.00 mm)
0.866 inch
(22.00 mm)
0.650 inch
(16.50 mm)
Edge Reeded Edge Variation Reeded Edge
Thickness 0.113 inch
(2.87 mm)
0.085 inch
(2.15 mm)
0.070 inch
(1.78 mm)
0.049 inch
(1.26 mm)

 

Limits, Prices and Ordering

The U.S. Mint’s online page of numismatic gold coins, located here, is the place to order 2024-W Proof American Gold Eagles.

Below are the product details, mintage information, and initial household order limits, along with the debut pricing.

Product Option Product Limit Mintage Limit Household Order Limit Price*
2024 $50 American Eagle Gold Proof Coin (1 oz.) 9,500 19,500 3 $3,200.00
2024 $25 American Eagle Gold Proof Coin (1/2 oz.) 5,000 15,000 3 $1,625.00
2024 $10 American Eagle Gold Proof Coin (1/4 oz.) 8,000 18,000 3 $840.00
2024 $5 American Eagle Gold Proof Coin (1/10 oz.) 18,000 28,000 3 $365.00
2024 American Eagle Gold Proof Coins (Four-Coin Set) 10,000 N/A 3 $5,980.00

 

*The initial pricing is subject to weekly changes based on the Mint’s precious metals coin pricing matrix. Presently, pricing is determined by LBMA gold, averaging within the range of $2,300 to $2,349.99 per ounce.

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Kia99

The mint’s description of the fractional coins says, ” Includes anti-counterfeit variable reeding.” The pictures don’t show this and the fractional coins haven’t included missing reeds in the past. I wonder if this is just a copy error or if the pictures are in error and the fractionals will actually be missing a reed this year?

rapt0r

In the “American Eagle Gold Specifications” table above it only shows the “Reeded Edge Variation” for the $50 coin. So I’m guessing it’s a typo.

Major D

Yes, I understand it’s just the $50 coin. For 2024, the position of its anti-counterfeiting edge notch that interrupts the reeding is relocated to the 9 o’clock position as viewed from the obverse.

East Coast Guru

I love the proof eagle and have a bunch of them. However, I will probably stop collecting them as they don’t seem to perform well on the secondary market. Dealers buy them (4 coin set) for $50 over what they pay for normal eagle bullion and they sell them for $500 over their purchase price which is still less than US Mint’s opening offer. I love those proofs, but I’ll save my money for another gold coin. I will have mixed emotions at noon today. Those who buy today, congrats. Enjoy your work of art!

Mark In Florida

I collected them every year until they raised the premiums to these ridiculous levels. Now I buy only bullion. When gold hits $3000 or $5000 proofs won’t be worth any more than bullion.

John Q. Coinage

Yup Mark, pre ‘33 still has good buys out there. Have you notice USM 2024 AGEs huge premiums thanks Cag. Ha ha

Major D

For comparison purposes, here’s what some past American Gold Eagle W-Proof 4-Coin sets (w/Box & COA) are currently selling for today on APMEX:
1996: $5,559.31;
1999: $4,859.31;
2000: $5,281.82;
2002: $6,281.82;
2003: $5,559.31;
2007: $5,209.31;
2008: $4,859.31;
2010: $4,859.31;
2011: $5,781.82;
2012: $4,909.31;
2018: $5,164.49;
2019: $4,959.31;
2020: $5,059.31;
2021 (Type 2): $5,495.00.
Though, I suspect you will not be finding any 69s or 70s in these.

CaliSkier

Major D said:”Though, I suspect you will not be finding any 69s or 70s in these.” If I had to venture a guess, I’d have to agree for the most part. Although since the majority of these particular coins, tend to grade 69 or 70, you’d at least have a chamce(?) at getting 69 graded coins IMO.

REB

All have gone up from purchase price BUT the early ones ($999 at purchase) have soared.

Major D

Funny, in reading that I was envisioning a “Soar, Eagles, Soar” dance.

eagles-soar
REB

Like.

Craig

I loved the sets when they were priced at only $999, although at the time they weren’t cheap. Even though I’ve made much more with my investments in stocks, the fact that gold is only produced by very large suns going supernova of merging neutron stars is something that fascinates me. And who knows, maybe one of your Proof AGE coins is made from gold that once adorned Cleopatra.

REB

“I’ve made much more with my investments in stocks”

Same here but I do like handling tangible things (even if they are in no way connected to the Queen of the Nile).

Kaiser Wilhelm

Craig,
The old saying about us being stardust is getting more backing by the day.

Craig

Kaiser, Very true, and that ‘stardust’, in the form of Au, has also gotten really expensive these days. I can’t complain, as I have more gold coins than I ever thought I’d have and they have appreciated nicely over the years. I just had Anderson windows installed in my home, so any gold coin purchases are on hold this year (although I did buy a 1986 1/10th oz Proof AGE at auction in February). What’s on your wish list for coins from the mint this year? BTW, glad to see you back in action! Damn, and the Edit function is… Read more »

Last edited 18 days ago by Craig
REB

Like.

Kaiser Wilhelm

Craig, I had to chuckle when I came across your enquiry regarding my Mint “wish list” for this year since the choice of coins I would wish to acquire for my collection and those that I will actually allow myself to buy this more than any year previously appear to present two vastly different scenarios. The Mint’s continuing sizeable increases in precious metal coin pricing as been driving the range of my purchases to the lower end of the scale, meaning this will in all likelihood end up being “The Year of the Clad Coins.” So far I’ve only picked… Read more »

Craig

Kaiser, The only coins I have plans on buying from the mint this year will be one each of the Morgan/Peace Dollars (just as I did for the year 2023). I hope to have a complete set of the newly minted M/P dollars and typically like buying them from the mint. I have all the silver proof sets from 1999 to the end of the ATB series, but haven’t purchased any from the Women’s series (the premiums are ridiculous and the designs are too ‘busy’ for me). I’ve been getting some of the authentic CC Morgans lately…I like to get… Read more »

Kaiser Wilhelm

Craig, It really is a relief for me to be made aware that I’m not the only one who’s been inclined to be more modest of late as opposed to years gone by in regard to the quantity of my Mint purchases. I know that this pulling back on coin expenditures shouldn’t in any realistic way be of concern, but as we know all too well the ego is rather vulnerable when it comes to believing that one might somehow be dropping the ball. Besides, don’t we as collectors typically think of the quality rather than the quantity of coins… Read more »

Craig

Couldn’t agree more, Kaiser. As I said earlier, I recently bought a couple MS65 CC Morgans, and while they don’t look perfect (as the new modern one’s do) they’ve been through history and still look damn nice. Besides, we both have an abundance of coins purchased from the mint from earlier years to peruse. I’m not one to just buy and put away never to view/examine again. I’m also selective in what I buy and like to feel as though I’m getting ‘value’ when I do. Unfortunately, I’m not feeling the love from the mint lately, but we’ll endure until… Read more »

CaliSkier

Interesting US Mint news! The US Mint will publish the following tomorrow in the Federal Register. “The United States Mint proposes to remove its regulations relating to the exchange of bent and partial coin. The proposed removal will end the exchange program for bent and partial coin. This document also withdraws the notice of proposed rulemaking relating to these same regulations that was published in the Federal Register for May 5, 2021.” I know they had put the program on hold, as they were accepting, unintentionally, scrap that couldn’t be identified as having been US Minted coins in the mixes,… Read more »

7BDF5420-F03A-48A2-BBD5-9EB307ADDCC3
CaliSkier

For any unfamiliar with the US mints: “Mutilated Coin Redemption Program”, here is the current link.

https://www.usmint.gov/news/consumer-alerts/mutilated-coin-program

Kaiser Wilhelm

Caliskier,
I just read that as the “Mutated Coin Redemption Program”. Is it possible my collector’s mind is open to the Mint’s having created such an unusual coin variety?

John Q. Coinage

Cali WTF, I got bags of slugs, washers and bus tokens from Nolan’s they bought b4 as US money…

CaliSkier

Excerpt from the revision done in May of 2021 as well as the link to that particular notice in the Federal Register. “Additionally, the condition of many coins submitted for examination precludes effective authentication. Rather than removing damaged coins from general domestic coin circulation, as was the intended purpose, many participants are seeking to submit large quantities of coins that, in some cases, have already been removed from general circulation (e.g., recovered from scrap or trash processing), or in other cases, are extremely difficult to authenticate due to their condition and volume. Finally, there are indicators of current counterfeit coin… Read more »

CaliSkier

Also from May of 2019 by Paul Gilkes for Coin World: “U.S. Mint suspends Mutilated Coin Redemption Program”

https://www.coinworld.com/news/us-coins/us-mint-suspends-mutilated-coin-redemption-program.html#:~:text=Mint%20has%20again%20suspended%20its,Coin%20Redemption%20Program%2C%20the%20U.S.

This has been an ongoing, “problem” for many years and dates back to at least 2015 and maybe longer? There are other Coin World and Coin Week articles on the topic and discussion on other coin blogs. I wonder what, if any program they are able to implement, or if this program is completely going away, leaving no ability for those that are “honest”, to redeem mutilated, bent, or worn coins?

F5AAB8FA-A756-4FDA-AE82-46E7DE9DC555
Dave SWFL

Looks scammy to me. Who in their right mind would accept any of those coins? I’d just hand them back to the cashier and demand replacement.

Major D

Takes me back to remembering the days when kids would flatten pennies (yes, called them pennies back then) but putting on a railroad track and having the train roll over them.

Major D

meant to type “by”, not “but”….I do miss the edit feature

Kaiser Wilhelm

Major D,
You’re so right about that particular use of everyday nomenclature back then. After all, did you ever hear those little sweet treats being called “cent candy”?

Last edited 18 days ago by Kaiser Wilhelm
REB

Got it! No waiting room and in and out in less than two minutes (okay, okay, I’m a slow reader and an even slower typist).

Rick

REB,
Your patience and dedication to collecting all of the Proof First Spouse Gold Coins is very impressive, and not an easy task. One day that(low Mintage)complete set will be highly prized imo..Your patience and dedication to collecting all(and I mean all)of the Proof Gold Eagles is over the top fantastic! Kudos REB! You truly have a Masterpiece in the making. I’m glad you share your collection interests with us. Thank you.

REB

Thank you for the kudos.

CaliSkier

Kia99, good catch: “The mint’s description of the fractional coins says, ” Includes anti-counterfeit variable reeding.” The pictures don’t show this and the fractional coins haven’t included missing reeds in the past.” Let us never forget how inept the US Mint is, when it comes to proof reading, prior to publication and or printing off thousands of COA’s! My next question is, will this same mistake show up on peoples COA’s? This can create a problem down the road on the secondary market IMO. As nobody will be able to locate the “missing reeds” on these fractionals and think the… Read more »

F7C7ABA3-7718-4777-AB0D-33C8067C586F
CaliSkier

Major D said: “ For 2024, the position of its anti-counterfeiting edge notch that interrupts the reeding is relocated to the 9 o’clock position as viewed from the obverse.” This is the same position(9:00) for the reverse as well. That is, as long as you weren’t “Lucky” enough to receive a coin, pressed on a set of rotated dies! LOL The Mint happened to change how the dies insert/mount into the presses, however in order to eliminate that potential, though, is my understanding. As long as the design/image is positioned with the top at 12:00, the missing reed will appear… Read more »

ACC569AC-CB01-4A73-BFC4-39855C14B414
Major D
CaliSkier

Congratulations Reb on your AGE purchase! Major D said: “ I do miss the edit feature”. The edit feature is still available Major D, however there is a limited time(5min?), that it’s available to use, then the icon goes away. For any unfamiliar with that feature, “Edit” is accessible, after posting, at the very bottom(just below) of your post for approximately(?) 5 minutes. Click the “gear” icon, then on the dialogue box that opens and the post your trying to edit will appear above. Just click somewhere in the previously typed comment and you enter the realm of “edit”. Hopefully… Read more »

Kaiser Wilhelm

Caliskier,
If it hadn’t been for this very informative post of yours I would have been unaware the “edit” function returned during my absence. Many thanks for the update!

Matt

Which individual coin do we think has the best value? 1/2oz coin has the lowest mintage of the 4. Does that lower mintage correlate to increase intrinsic value in the future?

East Coast Guru

Matt, I would search dealer sites, auctions and eBay for prices on the fractional proof gold coins and comparing them to mintage limits. My gut tells me that regardless of mintage, they will be bought by dealers for melt and sold for the same price as any other proof gold fractional with higher mintages.

CaliSkier

Regarding rotated dies, here is a a great article from Numismatic News on the subject: “Marshals rotated die error found” from July 16, 2015 by Ken Potter. Excerpts and link below. “While there are 19 rotated die gold coins listed on the online, Rotated Die Coin Census website, all are dated from 1852 to 1887. Listings on that site are restricted to 90- to 180-degree rotations, but it still gives us a valuable insight as to when most or all significant examples of such errors occurred on gold coins.” “Longtime error coin specialist/dealer, Fred Weinberg of Encino, Calif., who provides… Read more »

Mike Petraitis

In 2002 I bought the 4 pc set from the UD Mint for 995.00 the price for the 2024 set is $5980 .What is the cost going to be in another 22 years?

East Coast Guru

I bought the 1995 4 coin set which includes the W silver eagle several years ago at a show for less than the current 4 coin set. Last year my wife wanted to know where all my coin money I spent went over the years. I showed her a 2023 1/10 oz proof eagle and told her that for the same money, I bought a 1 oz gold eagle 30 years before. That’s when she understood.

REB

How much is that 1995-W silver eagle with or without gold going for today? Years ago, I recall a great temptation to break up that set.

East Coast Guru

I checked Numismedia and it looks like $16k for a proof 70, $3.5k for a 69 and $2,700 for a 68. I think the set is beautiful with all 5 coins I would hate to break it up.

REB

Wow. Thanks for the info. I, too, think the set looks nice together.

John Q. Coinage

I bought the UNC set, really popped but the proof mombettah…

Major D

Ok, I’m going to try something here. I’ve always had trouble trying to copy and paste any type of table, so I’m not sure how this will copy over. Below is an analysis of clad proof sets by year, with mintage, the Mint’s original list price, the equivalent amount of purchasing power in today’s dollars based on CPI using an inflation calculator, the current sales price on APMEX, and the (Loss) or Gain taking the difference between the APMEX price and the cost if you bought in the list year and adjusted for inflation to today. Year::::Mintage::::::::List:::::Equiv::::Apmex:::(Loss)Gain 1980:::3,554,806:::$10.00:::$41.69:::$6.99:::$(34.70)_ 1981:::4,063,083:::$11.00:::$37.80:::$7.99:::$(29.81)_ 1982:::3,857,479:::$11.00:::$35.60:::$7.99:::$(27.61)_… Read more »

Kia99

Thanks Major D, excellent comparative analysis.

REB

Good stuff, Major D. I love reading these informative charts.

Major D

Oops I spotted a few mintage line errors where I had skipped a row. Correction below
2013::::::802,460:::$31.95:::$42.84:::$36.99:::$(5.85)_
2014::::::714,661:::$31.95:::$42.15:::$37.99:::$(4.16)_
2015::::::662,934:::$32.95:::$43.42:::$54.99:::$11.57_
2016::::::595,219:::$31.95:::$41.58:::$89.99:::$48.41_

CaliSkier

Wow! Something about the 1995 W American Silver Eagle, I had been unaware of. Excerpt and link to PCGS. “The 10th Anniversary Set was priced at $999 each, either for all four Proof Gold Eagles or all four Proof Gold Eagles along with the free 1995-W Proof Silver Eagle as a bonus. All customers had to do was indicate that they wanted to receive the free coin on their order form and they would receive the 1995-W Proof Silver Eagle.” Why would anyone balk at the time, of receiving a “Free” coin with your purchase? I guess some, may not… Read more »

2DBB2A84-8E3A-4829-BA8C-14735CF81E53
REB

I don’t remember the free choice. I remember that it was the first proof Silver Eagle from West Point which caused quite a buzz (particularly since it was only available in the gold set). I think three years earlier (the 1792-1992 White House 200th Anniversary Dollar) West Point produced its first silver proof coin.

Kaiser Wilhelm

This is admittedly off-topic but I hereby invoke the right to freedom of numismatic expression to insert this personal reaction comment regardless. The fact is that for quite a few years now I have been buying rolls of all varieties and denominations from the Mint and in the course of all these acquisitions never failed to receive a single one that didn’t have examples of the obverse side and the reverse side showing. That being said, I recently received my 2024 Alabama Innovation Dollar Roll which I had been so very eager to purchase due to the fabulous depiction of… Read more »

CaliSkier

Kaiser Wilhelm, your “Freedom” to, “invoke the right to freedom of numismatic expression”, is granted and duly noted! LOL I’m sorry to hear about your Heads/Heads roll of 2024 Alabama AI $1’s. What a bummer! I’ll also apologize for the small chuckle this generated w/in. Probably nervous laughter, as in my brain, I was definitely saying, “oh no!”. Or maybe it was, when you closed with: “in order to get to “the good part”. Hmm…”, which invoked thoughts of the Tootsie Roll commercials of old? How many licks does it take to get to the center of a Tootsie roll… Read more »

BEE23AC0-C085-470E-97AA-B2857FCA76CD
Kaiser Wilhelm

Caliskier, Wow, thanks for all the valuable which is to say very practical information regarding the way the Mint handles the packaging of coin rolls. As an added bonus, you have in fact actually managed to thoroughly cheer me up in regard to my recent situation with the Alabama Innovation (Saturn V reverse) Dollar. To wit, it is now abundantly clear to me that I had been riding a very lengthy string of unbelievably good luck, especially considering I had never previously received a “double-headed”, so to speak, roll of coins in my entire history of buying these from the… Read more »

CaliSkier

After further review Kaiser the best deal I noticed was $4.09 w/free shipping. Another seller for $3.45 +$1.20 shipping, is offering them(P&D) mounted in cardboard flips. Sellers description: “These are business strike coins from fresh U.S. Mint rolls, they may contain marks, stains etc. due to the minting process. All coins were handled with cotton gloves and mounted in a labled 2X2. The photo is representative of what you will receive.” Title/heading of the latter listing: “2024 P/D Two American Innovation Dollars – Alabama – Saturn V”. Best of luck, whatever you decide. PS I didn’t provide links due to… Read more »

Kaiser Wilhelm

CaliSkier,
Thanks again; you have certainly gone a long way to help me out here and it’s all very much appreciated. 🙂

Last edited 18 days ago by Kaiser Wilhelm
CaliSkier

You are very welcome Kaiser! Although my coin purchases have waned, due to financials, my passion for coins has increased greatly over the past 2 1/2-3 years. Now, research and studying the markets has become my way of staying involved with the hobby. Many here, as well as previously on Mint News Blog, have provided the impetus to educate and increase my numismatic quest for knowledge. Glad you appreciate the, sharing of information! I’m on the “clad” wagon, more or less myself! LOL

Kaiser Wilhelm

Caliskier,
The reduction of my Mint coin purchases is due to the same reason; prices for everything everywhere keep going up while Social Security payments do not (the annual “cost of living” increase is anything but). But as is the case with you the limits imposed by my financial state don’t do anything to detract from my interest in coins; in fact, if anything it’s the opposite since the energy I would previously have invested in expanding my collection now goes toward simply appreciating what coins I already in it have instead.

CaliSkier

A few 2024 Alabama D rolls(8) and bags(44) available, in addition to some 2023 Jovita Idar(3) and Maria Tallchief(13) PDS AWQ 3 roll sets as well. Go get em’ team!

Last edited 18 days ago by CaliSkier
John Q. Coinage

Pass, I bought a 1873 0pen 3 MS61 NGC for $2,400 a much better buy, pass on these go Pre ‘33

John Q. Coinage

$20 Lib