NGC-certified American Eagles Score Records at Stack’s Bowers Auction

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An American Gold Eagle and American Silver Eagle that were certified by Numismatic Guaranty Company (NGC) have sold for a stunning $100,000 and $85,000, respectively. The "Dawn and Dusk" 35th Anniversary Auction was presented by Stack’s Bowers Galleries on September 1, 2022.

Last T1 and First T2 2021 American Gold Eagles graded NGC MS 70
Last T-1 and First T-2 2021 American Gold Eagles, each graded NGC MS 70

The Gold Eagle, which was the first struck with the new T-2 design, set a record for any American Gold Eagle sold at auction. The Silver Eagle, the last struck with the previous T-1 design, set a record for any modern US silver coin sold in a Stack’s Bowers auction.

Last T1 and First T2 2021 American Silver Eagles graded NGC MS 70
Last T-1 and First T-2 2021 American Silver Eagles, each graded NGC MS 70

Meanwhile, the first Silver Eagle struck with the new T-2 design sold for $80,000 and the last Gold Eagle struck with the previous T-1 design sold for $77,500. Each of the four coins was graded NGC MS 70, with its striking order attributed on the label.

The coins were among 1,000 Gold and Silver Eagles that NGC certified from a historic transition in the coins’ designs that took place in 2021. Recognizing their importance to the numismatic community, the US Mint held a special striking ceremony for the final group of Gold and Silver Eagles bearing the original design and the first ones with the new design. The presses were personally operated by David J. Ryder, who was Mint Director at the time, and Mint officials carefully documented the order in which these coins were struck.

"One of my greatest achievements was overseeing the transformation of the Gold and Silver Eagles for their 35th anniversary," said Ryder, who was the 34th and 39th Director of the US Mint and is now one of the most-prominent signers in NGC’s Signature Labels program. "We made sure this group of coins captured the excitement that this milestone represents to the numismatic community."

This is the first time that NGC was able to identify the first and last coins struck in a modern US Mint series, and the auction results highlighted the collector value that NGC helped to unlock. NGC’s certification and encapsulation of these Gold and Silver Eagles will ensure that numismatic value stays with them even as they trade hands in the future. NGC authenticated, graded and attributed these (including the order of their striking) on a special NGC label created exclusively for these coins. The NGC label shows an eagle from each of the four reverses of these coins:

  • the Type 1 (or T-1) Silver Eagle struck from 1986 to 2021 that shows a heraldic eagle, designed by 12th US Mint Chief Engraver John Mercanti
  • the Type 1 (or T-1) Gold Eagle struck from 1986 to 2021 that shows a family of eagles, designed by Miley (Busiek) Tucker-Frost
  • the Type 2 (or T-2) Silver Eagle struck beginning in 2021 that shows an eagle landing with its wings spread, which was sculpted by Michael Gaudioso
  • the Type 2 (or T-2) Gold Eagle struck beginning in 2021 that shows an impressive eagle’s head, designed by Jennie Norris

The Gold and Silver Eagles are the flagship bullion coins of the United States. More than 421 million Type 1 Silver Eagles and more than 21 million Type 1 Gold Eagles were struck. Similarly, the Type 2 coins opened a new chapter in numismatic history with a design that could be in use for decades. NGC has certified more than 13 million Silver Eagles and more than 1.8 million Gold Eagles, more than any other third-party grading service.

NGC was selected by Stack’s Bowers Galleries to certify the very last 250 of the Type 1 Silver Eagles ever struck as well as the very first 250 of the Type 2 Silver Eagles ever struck. In addition to these historic Silver Eagles, NGC was selected to grade and certify the final 250 of the 1-ounce Type 1 Gold Eagles ever struck as well as the first 250 of the 1-ounce Type 2 Gold Eagles ever struck.

"NGC is honored to have certified these historic coins, whose obverses are rooted in America’s numismatic renaissance over a century ago and whose reverses carry on a tradition of excellence in design and execution," said NGC Chairman Mark Salzberg. "I am proud to see these Gold and Silver Eagles, with their important provenance attributed by NGC, make numismatic history with these impressive prices."

Stack’s Bowers Galleries waived the buyer’s premium for the coins, known as the 2021 American Eagle at Dusk and at Dawn 35th Anniversary coins.

Other highlights in the sale included:

  • a 2021 T-2 Silver Eagle graded NGC MS 70 and attributed as the Fourth Coin Struck (lot 66) that sold for $18,000
  • a 2021 T-2 Gold Eagle graded NGC MS 70 and attributed as the Second Coin Struck (lot 76) that sold for $18,000
  • a 2021 T-1 Gold Eagle graded NGC MS 70 and attributed as the Second to Last Coin Struck (lot 75) that sold for $13,000
  • a 2021 T-1 Silver Eagle graded NGC MS 70 and attributed as the Fifth to Last Coin Struck (lot 61) that sold for $12,000
  • a 2021 T-2 Gold Eagle graded NGC MS 70 and attributed as the Fourth Coin Struck (lot 68) that sold for $12,000
  • a 2021 T-2 Gold Eagle graded NGC MS 70 and attributed as the Third Coin Struck (lot 72) that sold for $12,000
  • a 2021 T-1 Silver Eagle graded NGC MS 69 and attributed as the Second to Last Coin Struck (lot 73) that sold for $11,000
  • a 2021 T-2 Silver Eagle graded NGC MS 69 and attributed as the Second Coin Struck (lot 74) that sold for $11,000

About Numismatic Guaranty Company™ (NGC®)

NGC is the world’s largest and most trusted third-party grading service for coins, tokens and medals, with more than 55 million collectibles certified. Founded in 1987, NGC provides an accurate, consistent and impartial assessment of authenticity and grade. Every coin that NGC certifies is backed by the comprehensive NGC Guarantee of authenticity and grade, which gives buyers greater confidence. This results in higher prices realized and greater liquidity for NGC-certified coins. To learn more, visit NGCcoin.com.

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Antonio

I wonder if any of ours are worth that much. Might be sitting on a mint and not know it.

Kaiser Wilhelm

Antonio, two specific and unique events occurred here:
1) For the very first time, the actual order of mintage was documented.
2) Both the silver and gold Bullion coins set records for auction prices.

victor

I have a question. it’s not related to this post but I figure I’ll get fast, truthful, and quick answers from you guys. What can I use to rinse a US commemorative proof clad half dollar of its imperfections? Obviously I don’t want to damage it.

Kaiser Wilhelm

victor,

I assume you’re referring to dirt, since imperfections are permanent.

Jeff Legan

Hi Victor, I wish this site would do articles occasionally about cleaning and caring for coins. I think you are going to need to be more specific about what type of “imperfections” you are talking about, as Kaiser Wilhelm mentioned. The only coins I know it is acceptable to clean in any major way are the ones that are dug up out of the ground. I always seem to hear you cannot normally clean coins in any major way without further reducing their value. Dust them off with a clean cloth or wipe smudges with the same is about the… Read more »

Kaiser Wilhelm

Hello again Jeff, I’m glad you weighed in here in such a timely fashion with some good advice for Victor; my mind had simply frozen beyond my “dirt vs. imperfection” comment. I don’t think much is said here about cleaning coins precisely because it is something better well left alone. Unless such a procedure is done by an expert it’s likely wise to let things be. The condition of a coin is what it is, and as you pointed out, the effect of time will have either enhanced its appearance or tainted it beyond recovery; either way, you have what… Read more »

Last edited 11 days ago by Kaiser Wilhelm
Victor

Thank you, Jeff. My coin is modern 2001 Capital Visitor Center Proof Clad Half Dollar. I would need a specific technic to clean/remove the only tiny spot on it. Possibly corrosion.

TheKings714

Hi victor, This site is fantastic, and yes, you will get fast, truthful, and quick answers from the team but unfortunately coins, like all objects, are subject to the environmental pollutants of our world. With that being said, if you can’t blow off the ‘imperfections’ with a quick puff of your breath, it might not be worth your time as you might damage the coin beyond its worth. You might hear the following options but proceed at your own risk. Acetone – I have seen acetone leave a white milky film on coins after being dipped to remove spots (Acetone… Read more »

Kaiser Wilhelm

“…if you can’t blow off the ‘imperfections’ with a quick puff of your breath, it might not be worth your time as you might damage the coin beyond its worth.”

With that statement, TheKings714, you explained the situation as well as is possible.

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TheKings714

Thanks KW!

You are the reason so many of us come to this site so keep up the good work.

Cheers! (but without C2H5OH so you may maintain your long and well deserved sobriety)

Kaiser Wilhelm

You are very welcome, TheKIngs714, and far too kind and generous.

I do my little bit to keep this wonderful discussion site rolling along, and if any part of that appeals to someone enough to encourage their own engagement here then I consider myself twice blessed.

Thanks also for the “cheers”, and I am quite sure my many years of sobriety have contributed to my upcoming 30th wedding anniversary.

Rich

Sir Kaiser,
Congratulations on your commemorative 30th Wedding Anniversary!

Kaiser Wilhelm

Thank you so much, Good Sir Rich. Your warm wishes are very much appreciated!

Victor

Congrats on you 30th Wedding Anniversary Kaiser.

I was talking about 2001 Capital Visitor Center Proof Clad Half Dollar. Only 6 graded NGC PF 70 UC. I have this coin and it appears to have a very small speck of some sort. Maybe corrosion.

Kaiser Wilhelm

Thank you for your kind words, Victor; very much appreciated!

Just tossing in my two cents worth, but if you are aiming for a high grade for your coin from NGC I would really think long and hard before doing anything along the lines of “cleaning” it.

Victor

Thank you TheKings. My coin is 2001 Capital Visitor Center Proof Clad Half Dollar. This coin appears to have a speck of some sort. Possibly corrosion. Since it’s proof, I’m thinking to spot treating it but with what I’m not sure yet. Acetone works on silver coins salt on metal doesn’t sound right to me.

Victor

Thank you Major. I have 2001 Capital Visitor Center Proof Clad Half Dollar. Only 6 graded NGC PF 70 UC, and I want to send it for grading too. Looks like this coin has a speck of some sort. Maybe corrosion. Everything else look good. I would have to spot treat it.

Rich

Victor, I would not try to treat that spot at all, especially if you are submitting the coin to NGC (or PCGS) for grading.

Kaiser Wilhelm

Good advice to Victor, Good Sir Rich, since rather than getting a numerical grade he may well end up with a “Details” coin instead.