Making American History Coin and Currency Set Sales Open at 24,130

by CoinNews.net on August 15, 2012 · 53 comments

Debuting sales figures are in for the Making American History Coin and Currency Set.

2012 Making American History Coin and Currency Set

Starting sales of the Making American History Coin and Currency Set hit 24,130

Collectors of the set ordered 24,130 between its release on August 7, 2012 and August 13, 2012. Priced at $72.95, the dollar amount pulled in for the product totaled $1,760,284.

In terms of the numbers sold, it represented nearly half of the set’s initial 50,000 production run that could reach up to 100,000 should collector demand call for it.

The Making American History Coin and Currency Set is a unique product that commemorates the Bureau of Engraving and Printing’s 150th anniversary and the United States Mint’s 220th anniversary. Included within the set is a 2012-S Proof American Silver Eagle and a Series 2009 $5 bill with a beginning serial number of ‘150.’ As shown in the above picture, the Silver Eagle and $5 come packaged with a descriptive folder that describes them and the histories of the two government agencies.

2012-S Proof American Silver Eagles were also sold within the U.S. Mint’s earlier offered 2012-S Silver Eagle Two-Coin Proof Set, which had reported sales of 251,302. Adding that figure to the latest sales of the Making American History Coin and Currency Set gives a total of 275,432 for the 2012-S Proof American Silver Eagle.

The coin and currency set may be ordered directly from the United States Mint website at http://www.usmint.gov or by calling 1-800-872-6468.

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Joe

If they haven’t sold out by now. I don’t think they will sellout anytime soon.

Victor

Look at all the coin and currency sets. It would be prudent to get some and hold them. Just saying.

Joe

It’s going to be the lowest minted S proof Silver Eagle of them all. I don’t know why more people jump on it. Can’t go wrong.

Ed A

Joe,
My gut feeling tells me that since the S proof Silver Eagle was a success in 2012, we’ll be seeing lower mintages of the same coin in 2013, which will make this one the second lowest…and so on. Unfortunately, I have the same feeling about the Reverse Proof for years to come. So, while your statement about being the lowest minted, I would add the words “for now” after them.

Joe

Denver will be next year.

Victor

I’m looking forward to a “D” mint marked ASE, also.

Joe

Ed A, the lower the better for the S mint mark if they do it next year. But how low would you think the Mint will go to make it worth their while?

Homer

Mintages could always go a lot higher in future as well. It all depends on future demand. If you are a collector, you need the 2012-S regardless of any future mintages. Proofs have been around since 1986 and we have the 2nd lowest mintage to this point. Those are the facts. The truth of the matter is that the value of the 2012-S will be based on what collectors will pay for it in the future. The Mint is generally in business to make money and the higher the mintages, the more money they make.

Ed A

Home
Although I agree with your theory that the Mint will go higher mintage to get more money, in principle…you seem to forget that unfortunately they make the most money out of people that re-sell the coins in the secondary market and in order for them to make profits the mintages have to be low.

RonnieBGood

Cost over value analysis:
$27.75 (Silver troy oz on 8/15) + $5 Note = $32.75 nominal Set Value.
$72.95 (coin & currency set cost) + $4.95 (mint shipping cost) = $77.90.
$77.90 – $32.75 = $45.15 profit (cost over value).

There are nominal minting (2nd mintage or excess from 1st?) and the cardboard packaging cost. Any way you value it the Mint is truly the Winner here.

jim

Ed A –
Not sure I understand how the mint makes the most money on people who sell in the secondary market. Could you explain that please?

george glazener

“This is where my theory falls to the ground. I was only hoping you wouldn’t make that particular point, but I can see you’re more than a match for me.”

(Monty Python’s Flying Circus, 1971)

Ed A

Jim, With pleasure…The Mint is looking really bad now after the “lack of comunication” in their part about including the 2012 S Proof in a second set and it is showing in the secondary market, where the 2 coin set reached an average of $250 at one point, but can be had now if I want for $180. This is only $30 over the price set by the mint. Being an economist, I am well aware of the law of “supply and demand”, I am sure you are too. For instance, how do you think the precious 1994 Silver Eagle… Read more »

Joe

Python’s Flying Circus & some good smoke. Back in 71. Remember when.

Joe

Apples & Oranges Ed A. Hang on to those pennies they will be worth something someday.

bill

Ill sell ya my LP3’s, 4’s and 5’s 🙂

RonnieBGood

I’m with George and Joe on this one…

Confuseus say, “Better to be thought a fool and remain silent than to open mouth and remove all doubt.”

RonnieBGood

Gave up being an Economist to be a Brain Surgeon. Then again, I’m sure you are too.

Homer

$180 less 10% in fees equals a profit of about $5 after shipping factored in. There is still time for everyone but me to cancel their 2 coin sets. I feel good about the long term potential if the investors decide this set isn’t worth it. I don’t think the problem is the mint. I think it is the number of people buying coins from the mint solely for a profit. The mint is just providing a product to whoever will buy it. The 2009 pennies are a good example. Mintage was low and people weren’t buying lots of extras… Read more »

Ed A

Well put Homer,
The Mint has the tough balancing act of pleasing true collectors, investors and everyone in between. Everyone must remain “interested”…

Joe

The customers who bought coin & currency sets & San Fran sets are going to have to wait for the coin & currency sets to sell out at the Mint. When that happens, the price of the two sets will go up in value.

Joe

I should have said. The customers who want to flip their coin & currency & San Fran sets should wait for the coin & currency sets to sell out at the Mint. How ever long that will be.

RonnieBGood

Once heard it said that the only “True Collector” is the one who has their collection buried with them when they go.

RonnieBGood

Let’s not let the Mint off the Hook so easily. One example:

From 1947 thru 1998 the Uncirculated “Mint Sets” had between 8 to 10 coins. In 1999 this jumped to 18 coins and by 2007 we were up to 28 coins per set. The trend continues upward. This is a troubling factor when comparing to other recent markets that have risen and then fallen.

Joe

Hope I cash before I pass.

Joe

36 coins for 2009 . Safer with the gold platium & silver market. Than stock.

jim

Just got my coin and currency set in the mail. Serial no. of the $5 bill was over 50,000 and the letter on the right is a D – meaning they’re just putting in any old $5 bill they can find that starts with 150. In other words, there’s nothing special about the $5 bill in any way, shape, or form. If they really were planning on this being a special collection the bill would have had a serial no. less than 50,000 and ended with an A. Of course they would have had to pick them out back in… Read more »

BILLYBOB

Have you heard of serial # that starts different than 150 ?

Joe

Just opened my coin & currency sets. The Mint could put the $5 bills into circulation and nobody would know the difference. The lowest serial # I recieved was over 20,000 and the letter D on the right. Is it that the signature is rare or something? Rosie Rios,

jim

No.

Victor

I ordered 6 sets and opened one, just to see what it looked like. I’m impressed with the ASE. I’ve looked through a jewelers loop and it looks like a 70. The $5 bill is 150 and the next five numbers are lower than 11700 D. I contacted NGC about the policy of not opening the package because of the 2012-S ASE being in two different issues. They said, to get the Coin and currency designation, the coin and currency has to be intact and they will forward the bill to PNG for grading, if the collector wants it. As… Read more »

Joe

Thanks jim. Just looked at some cash. I should have known better.

Victor

So many rules and regs.

RonnieBGood

Very expensive to get a bill graded, twice as much as the coin. As for the 2012 “S” coin set Submission Instructions: Remove the coins from the US Mint packaging and submit them raw in the capsules. Do not send the Mint packaging. IMPORTANT UPDATE: To receive the SAN FRANCISCO EAGLE SET pedigree, the Proof and Reverse Proof 2012-S Silver Eagles must be received in equal numbers on the same submission form. If the Proof 2012-S Silver Eagles are submitted without an equal or higher number of Reverse Proof 2012-S Silver Eagles, they will NOT be eligible for the special… Read more »

Joe

Victor i’m just curious. The coin & currency set you opened can still be graded. Is that right.

Victor

Joe, yes it can. Before I opened any of the two different sets, I e-mailed NGC for their requirements. Both sets can be opened but the CnC has to be un tampered with. Just leave it sealed in the plastic.

jim

Joe –
We all should have known better. I guess if they don’t say anything about why a coin or bill is special it’s best to assume nothing is. An 8 digit serial number starting with 150 is nothing special considering there are at least 300,000 with the letter A, B, and C that came before it.

Joe

Never collected currency before. I had a few red seal $2 bills & a blue seal $10 bill that I got from an ice cream truck at the beach when I was a kid. Sold them when I was a teenager with other coins. $10 bill was all wrinkled. Thanks jim & Victor for the info.

Joe

The Mint I would think should have used a $2 bill more collectable would’nt you say? And save 3 bucks.

Victor

Joe, the BEP could have included a $1 or a $10,000 bill. The cost to the BEP is the same, however, our cost would have been sky high. The $5 is nice. Remember, we know, going in what it includes. Buy them or not, we make that decision. But, all of you are correct when you say, the BEP, considering what was charged for this set, could have made a special bill, with 150 in the first #’s and 00001-what ever the total ordered was. Now, that is a “special collectable!”

Joe

Your right Victor it’s just paper, which they can’t back-up anyway. I’ll try and stick with precious metal.

Homer

You can also send in the to PMG who will grade currency and forward coin to NGC. I understand that currency can have different letters after the serial number. What I don’t understand is why they say this is limited to 100,000 sets based on the number of bills with 150 as the first 3 serial numbers when
they can just add a different letter after the serial number. Everyone so far
seems to have serial numbers with the D after them. Maybe they all have the
letter D after serial number.

RonnieBGood

Bill collecting increased when bill grading was introduced about 5 years ago. It has dropped off considerably since. Bill grading is quite a bit more expensive than coins (5 coin submission for the lowest price) unless you submit in larger quantities of 25 or 50+.

RonnieBGood

FYI –
PMG is part of the NGC family. NGC also has a service for grading comic books.

Joe

Victor, I don’t know if this is a foolish ? or not. Do you think their is a $5bill that starts with the serial # 15000001 & so on, for the coin & currency sets?

Victor

Joe, you never know! It would have been too easy to hope that the BEP would have done something so nice. My bill, on one set is 11699 D, with the 150 being the first three numbers. Maybe it happened and we don’t know about it, yet. Of course, maybe one day at a coin show or auction, one will show up.

jim

Joe –
Since my $5 serial # is over 50,000 (and we know they haven’t sold 50,000 sets yet) I would bet that while there most likely exists a $5 bill with the serial # of 00001 I would say it’s likely they didn’t start collecting the 150nnnnn bills until after that bill had already been distributed to the public or maybe even more likely saved off for some high ranking official of some sort.

Joe

Yeah probably right jim. But don”t you think they made the 100,000 sets yet. Look how their giving them out between Victor you & me. Their all over the map.

jim

Joe –
And exactly the way I believe proof coins are picked for inclusion in the 2 coin set and for this set, which is why I think there is no value to the pedigree the coin graders give to coins. A silver eagle is a silver eagle is a silver eagle, regardless of it’s packaging and other accompanying eagles/bills, just like a $5 bill is a $5 bill is a $5 bill. In this case there’s physical proof with the serial numbers that are showing up as you mentioned. These are totally random pairings with no significance at all.

Joe

Only when it”s time to sell, the graded coins will be worth more than the ungraded coins. I wish it never happen. Say I received 1500007 I would not have it graded. I will be the only one who has it anyway,so what the sent’s.

Joe

I left out that I wanted to say jim your right it’s best to leave the coin & currency alone.

jim

Joe – I’m not against grading coins – I think a coin’s grade is an indication to a prospective buyer of what it’s value is to him and helps him decide what he wants to pay for that coin. By pedigree I mean the label that says “20th Anniversary First Strike” (how totally ridiculous that is) for example, or “San Francisco Eagle Set” or whatever else they might say to make a coin seem to be more unique than another coin that’s exactly the same. These pedigree labels are a marketing ploy made up by the coin grading companies to… Read more »

Joe

Most dealers I hate to say pay more for these pedigree labels,not much more. But we pay more to have them graded. It’s a joke.