World War I Centennial 2018 Marine Corps Silver Medal Photos

by Mike Unser on October 26, 2018 · 4 comments

This article presents photos of a World War I Centennial 2018 Marine Corp Silver Medal. The medal is one of five from the United States Mint that commemorates the branches of the U.S. Armed Forces that were active during the First World War.

The United States Mint on Jan. 17 started selling proof silver medals honoring the U.S. Marines Corps, the Army, the Navy, the Air Service, and the U.S. Coast Guard.

Photo of World War I Centennial 2018 Marine Corps Silver Medal - Obverse and Reverse

CoinNews photos of a World War I Centennial 2018 Marine Corps Silver Medal – Obverse and Reverse

They are minted to support the commemorative World War I Centennial Silver Dollars which Congress authorized under Public Law 113-212 to memorialize America’s involvement in WWI.

Photo of 2018-P Proof and Uncirculated World War I Centennial Silver Dollars in Case

CoinNews photo of a proof (left) and uncirculated (right) World War I Centennial 2018 Silver Dollar

Struck in collector finishes of proof and uncirculated, the U.S. Mint will offer both dollars at respective prices of $56.95 and $53.95 until the end of this year.

The medals are not sold individually or together, but instead each is paired with a proof WWI Silver Dollar and offered as a distinct set for $99.95. Those wanting all five medals have to buy all five sets. (The sets originally had an ordering deadline of Feb. 20 but their sales reopened July 31.)

World War I Centennial 2018 Silver Dollar and Marine Corp Silver Medal, Certificate and Case

CoinNews photo of a World War I Centennial 2018 Silver Dollar and Marine Corps Silver Medal Set, including its presentation case and certificate of authenticity

The set with the Army silver medal has the biggest sales so far at 15,586; followed by close groupings of the sets with the Marine Corps medal at 12,619; the Air Service medal at 12,495; and the Navy medal at 12,214. The set with Coast Guard medal has sales of 9,568.

Photo of World War I Centennial 2018 Silver Medals-3

CoinNews photo of World War I Centennial 2018 Silver Medals. Weighing 26.730 grams, each is struck in 90% silver and 10% copper.

Marine Corps medal obverses show the aftermath of the Battle of Belleau Wood, with one Marine standing guard as the other kneels to pay respect to the fallen. The inscription quotes a report to the American Expeditionary Forces: WOODS NOW U.S. MARINE CORPS ENTIRELY. Chris Costello designed the image and Michael Gaudioso sculpted it.

World War I Centennial 2018 Marine Corps Silver Medal - Obverse, Encapsulated

CoinNews photo of a World War I Centennial 2018 Marine Corps Silver Medal – Encapsulated
Obverse

Sculpted by Joseph Menna, reverses feature the World War I-era version of the Eagle, Globe, and Anchor emblem with the inscriptions of CENTENNIAL OF WORLD WAR I, 2018, OVER THERE!, and BATTLE OF BELLEAU WOOD. Produced at the San Francisco Mint, the reverse also has a "S" mint mark.

World War I Centennial 2018 Marine Corps Silver Medal - Reverse, Encapsulated

CoinNews photo of a World War I Centennial 2018 Marine Corps Silver Medal – Encapsulated Reverse

All five medals and both silver dollars share major specifications, including a composition of 90% silver and 10% copper, a weight of 26.730 grams, and a diameter of 1.500 inches. Their edges are different, however, with those of the dollars reeded and edges of the medals flat and plain.

Get the World War I Centennial Silver Dollars and sets from the U.S. Mint’s online store for commemorative products, found here.

Surcharges of $10 are collected on the sale of each dollar with proceeds, after associated costs, paid to the United States Foundation for the Commemoration of the World Wars to assist the World War I Centennial Commission in memorializing the centenary of the war.

Below are a few more photos of World War I Centennial 2018 Marine Corps Silver Medals.

Photo of World War I Centennial 2018 Marine Corps Silver Medal - Obverse and Reverse-a

Two photos showing a medal’s obverse and reverse

Photo of World War I Centennial 2018 Marine Corps Silver Medal - Obverse

A larger view of an obverse

Photo of World War I Centennial 2018 Marine Corps Silver Medal - Obverse-a

One more view of an obverse

Photo of World War I Centennial 2018 Marine Corps Silver Medal - Reverse-a

A larger view of a reverse

Photo of World War I Centennial 2018 Marine Corps Silver Medal - Reverse

One more view of a reverse

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Tim. B.
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Tim. B.

One of the most important reason why I bought all 5 sets was the order deadline. I thought that this would cause a limited amount sold . False advertisement from the mint. Not happy at all. Tim. B.

Mansfield
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Mansfield

Thank you for the great photos of these medals. However, I find it both frustrating and sad that the U.S. Mint demonstrates a lack of enthusiasm or knowledge of how to market their products. These photos highlight details that the Mint refused to describe or display in its original product offering, such as has been done with many other products before. As I have conveyed to them previously, it is as if they try their best not to succeed at marketing or selling their products. It seems that the craftsmanship that went into producing these medals was undersold, which most likely resulted in a lack of sales. That is too bad for the cause.
Of course, the dollar coin that had been paired with these medals is an entirely separate issue, and was the deciding factor for me not to purchase any of these sets.

Vachon
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Vachon

Wait, so why weren’t things like these part of the World War I commemorative coins? Surely there are three important battles the United States took part in victoriously that could’ve been showcased on each of the three coins typically offered (half dollar, dollar, and half eagle)

Chas Barber
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Timely article…NOT. I call BS on the mint on this set & medals, sales after cutoff, sales of returns, sales of returned retruns…..and the FUGULY WW1 coin is lie a herpes, no one wants one for nothing…..