World War I Centennial 2018 Silver Dollar Photos

by Mike Unser on February 20, 2018 · 20 comments

This article presents photos of World War I Centennial Silver Dollars, the U.S. Mint collector coins commemorating the 100th anniversary of America’s involvement in the First World War.

Photos of World War I Centennial 2018 Silver Dollars

CoinNews photos of proof and uncirculated World War I Centennial 2018 Silver Dollars

Released on Jan. 17, the collectibles are produced at the Philadelphia Mint in finishes of proof and uncirculated.

Proof coins have frosted designs that contrast attractively against mirror-like backgrounds. They are almost aways more sought than uncirculated coins which have a brilliant but more standard appearance. The following sets of photos show both coin types. In the first photo, a proof WWI Silver Dollar is to the left. You can see its mirrored qualities reflects the red, white and blue colors from its presentation case.

Photo of 2018-P Proof and Uncirculated World War I Centennial Silver Dollars in Case

CoinNews photo of a proof (left) and uncirculated (right) World War I Centennial Silver Dollars


Photo of 2018-P Proof World War I Centennial Silver Dollar - Obverse and Reverse

CoinNews photos of the obverse and reverse of a proof World War I Centennial 2018 Silver Dollar. The coin’s obverse depicts an almost stone-like soldier gripping a rifle. Barbed wire twines are featured in the lower right-hand side of the design. The wire design element continues onto the reverse, which also features abstract poppies mixed in with barbed wire. The designs resulted from a judged competition won by LeRoy Transfield. Don Everhart sculpted the designs.


Photo of 2018-P Uncirculated World War I Centennial Silver Dollar - Obverse and Reverse

CoinNews photos of the obverse and reverse of an uncirculated World War I Centennial 2018 Silver Dollar

Both dollars ship in similar commemorative packaging. They arrive boxed, are held in a black-velvet presentation case, and are accompanied by a U.S. Mint Certificate of Authenticity.

Photo of 2018-P Proof World War I Centennial Silver Dollar in Case, Cert, Box

A proof WWI dollar, its case, certificate and packaging

Photo of 2018-P Uncirculated World War I Centennial Silver Dollar in Case, Cert, Box

An uncirculated WWI dollar, its case, certificate and packaging

Ordering

Available at discounted introductory prices until 3:00 p.m. ET on Feb. 20, with the proof $51.95 and the uncirculated $48.95, place orders using the U.S. Mint’s online commemorative page. Regular prices are $5 higher.

WWI Silver Medals

Honoring the Army, the Navy, the Air Service, the Marines and the Coast Guard, five companion WWI silver medals are sold alongside the silver dollars. Each of the five medals is sold in a set with a proof WWI Silver Dollar. The medals/sets go off-sale after 3:00 p.m. ET on Feb. 20.

Additional Photos

Here are some larger CoinNews photos of a proof dollar:

Photo of 2018-P Proof World War I Centennial Silver Dollar - Obverse

This is a larger photo of a proof dollar’s obverse

Photo of 2018-P Proof World War I Centennial Silver Dollar - Obverse-b

One more photo of a proof dollar’s obverse

Photo of 2018-P Proof World War I Centennial Silver Dollar - Obverse-a

Another photo of a proof dollar’s obverse

Photo of 2018-P Proof World War I Centennial Silver Dollar - Reverse

Another photo of a proof dollar’s reverse

Photo of 2018-P Proof World War I Centennial Silver Dollar - Reverse-a

This is a larger photo of a proof dollar’s reverse

Finally, here are some larger CoinNews photos of an uncirculated dollar:

Photo of 2018-P Uncirculated World War I Centennial Silver Dollar - Obverse-b

This is a larger photo of an uncirculated dollar’s obverse

Photo of 2018-P Uncirculated World War I Centennial Silver Dollar - Obverse-a

Another photo of an uncirculated dollar’s obverse

Photo of 2018-P Uncirculated World War I Centennial Silver Dollar - Reverse-a

This is a larger photo of an uncirculated dollar’s reverse

Photo of 2018-P Uncirculated World War I Centennial Silver Dollar - Reverse-b

Another photo of an uncirculated dollar’s reverse

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DENNISDanielCJChas BarberOld Collector Recent comment authors
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Old Collector
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Old Collector

I always find myself having a hard time deciding if I like the glossier finish of the proof or the naturalistic tone of the uncirculated; each has its own unique appeal.

Mouse
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Mouse

The detail on these coins = amazing. I feel the same way Old Collector. Both platforms have their unique qualities.

Mouse

Jeffrey R
Guest
Jeffrey R

Well the WWI medal sales have ended. Let the dust settle and see the final sales count. It can only go down from here…..

Chas Barber
Guest

Beyond the funky ergonomics of the lefty advance….the self portrait of the designer…..where is the rest of his body, heads & hands it seems…. I am just Debby Downer on this issue!!!

Chas Barber
Guest

Oh and there is this….IU.S. Entry into World War I, 1917. NOT 1918!???

JFK !ooth is in 2019 did you see the USM changed his birthday!!!

DENNIS
Guest
DENNIS

The U.S. entered the war in 1917 but did not join the fight until July 26 1918 when Gen. Pershing sent our troops over the wire to rush the German machine gunners that slaughtered those poor young boys. I have my great uncles death certificate stating that he was killed July 26 1918. Gen. Pershing resigned from command after the days fighting after personally seeing the slaughter of his troops.The French, English and others held the line in their trenches for months without gaining an inch. When they were pulled from the line and replaced with American Soldiers Gen. Pershing had to make something happen and gave the fateful order to advance, after seeing the slaughter he was so affected by it he could no longer command and asked to be replaced. The next commanding general continued to give the same orders and the Americans slowly pushed the Germans out… Read more »

Jeffrey R
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Jeffrey R

@chas barber
EXACTLY!!!!
On April 6, 1917, the U.S. joined its allies–Britain, France, and Russia–to fight in World War I. Under the command of Major General John J. Pershing, more than 2 million U.S. soldiers fought on battlefields in France. Many Americans were not in favor of the U.S. entering the war and wanted to remain neutral.

CJ
Guest
CJ

The coin is to commemorate the US contribution to the end of the war – not the entry.

Mouse
Guest
Mouse

April 6th was the date and the declaration of war had to happen. US merchant ships, 5 to be exact were sunk at the beginning of the year / January 1917. That was a show of force and superiority of the oceans by the aggressor. War had to take place, and I was surprised the declaration from congress took so long. No country can remain neutral when their citizens are being killed by an unjust aggressor. These coins are a reminder that no good comes of war / for both sides / but action must take place when innocent citizens are murdered at sea by a force that had clearly shown their intent and the times to come. I am proud to have come from a military family / grandfather fought two wars – combat / professional solider and bleed red for our flag / Canada. Sometimes diplomacy wont work… Read more »

Old Collector
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Old Collector

My best guess regarding the date on the coin would be that it refers not to the year of the United States of America’s entry into World War I but rather the date of the declaration of cessation of all hostilities, which was November 11, 1918. Hence, the 1918-2018 inscription on this silver dollar. Indeed, if this coin had been intended instead to commemorate the 100th anniversary of America’s entry into the war, its release would have been sometime late last year and the inscription would then have read 1917-2017.

Seth Riesling
Guest
Seth Riesling

Mike Unser –

Thanks again for sharing your always great high res photographs with us fellow collectors!

-NumisdudeTX

Daniel
Guest
Daniel

I look forward to a commemorative bitcoin to mark the centenary of the end of the Second World War

Old Collector
Guest
Old Collector

Daniel,
The virtual World-Wide Web Mint will any day now begin accepting virtual design submissions for its upcoming series of WWII virtual commemoratives. Start saving your virtual dollars for this big virtual event!

Chas Barber
Guest

Dear CJ & OLd Collector, NO sorry, it is another EXAMPLE of the mint’s ineptitude, or just ‘tude- No the COMMEMORATIVE PER THE MINT’s website is to: “Commemorates the centennial of America’s involvement in World War I” Unquote….so 1917 is 100 not ’18 that’s 1o1! We Americans are not supposedly great @ Math but I can count quite well & $100 for a .90% silver dollar (14.85 spot ‘i$h) & a medal (16.50) is a triple keystone markup I passed, I have cut down SO much on mint stuff, except my $800 in Pre$ dollars @ end (why I do not know….but Nixon $1’s to give out wow!) @ end of ’17. I have to buy 1 birth year 2o18 set, but can’t see what elese maybe Jimmy Thorpe it’s cool but the HR Eagle & it’s offsrping never blew my skirt up…..and the WW1 is a real cluttered &… Read more »

Old Collector
Guest
Old Collector

I concur…the Jim Thorpe dollar is not just very well designed but also brilliantly evocative of his outstanding athletic attributes.

CJ
Guest
CJ

Chas – read the act.

https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/PLAW-113publ212/pdf/PLAW-113publ212.pdf

It literally says in there to make it in 2018 and put 2018 on it. So, the legislation told the Mint what to do.

Daniel
Guest
Daniel

Chas, relax mate. The mint does make a billion version if you want to stack silver. https://www.apmex.com/product/152627/2018-1-oz-silver-american-eagle-mintdirect-single

I’m failing to see why you are so angry at the price being asked.
No one is forcing you to buy a centenary medal, so don’t let it get to you.

My wife collects Versace coffee cups … now that is a stupid hobby smile

Old Collector
Guest
Old Collector

CJ,
Thanks for providing that link. The Act makes for very enlightening reading, especially as a way of learning how explicitly it covers every single factor involved in producing the coin, including any possible variables. They (the Congress) certainly do manage to have every base covered, don’t they?

Old Collector
Guest
Old Collector

Daniel,
Your illumination regarding the nature of your wife’s hobby has given me pause and urged me to reflect on whether or not my Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Rubber Ducky collection is in fact a good investment of my time and money. Ach du lieber!

Old Collector
Guest
Old Collector

Daniel,
By the way, there really IS exactly such a product line of rubber ducks on sale in the gift shop of the Mozart House & Museum in Salzburg, Austria!