2018 World War I Navy Medal Designs Reviewed

by Mike Unser on March 28, 2017 · 10 comments

The U.S. Mint in 2018 will issue silver medals to augment silver dollars commemorating the centennial of America’s involvement in World War I. The medals will celebrate the five branches of the U.S. Armed Forces. One of them will commemorate the U.S. Navy.

Recommended Navy Silver Medal Designs - Obverse and Reverse

CCAC and CFA recommended Navy Silver Medal designs – Two different obverses and a reverse

Candidate designs for the medals were discussed and reviewed by the Commission of Fine Arts (CFA) on March 16 and by the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (CCAC) on March 21.

Navy Medal Recommendations

For the Navy Silver Medal, the U.S. Mint presented 6 designs for consideration with 3 obverses and 3 reverses. The CFA and CCAC recommended two different obverses but voted for the same reverse design.

CCAC and CFA Recommended Navy Silver Medal Obverse Designs

CCAC and CFA Recommended Navy Silver Medal Obverse Designs

The CCAC’s obverse choice was NVY-O-01, which portrays a four-piper destroyer targeting an enemy submarine by launching depth charges off the stern with an additional depth charge exploding in the background. In the sky, kite balloons patrol for submarines and other dangers.

The CFA’s obverse recommendation was NVY-O-02, which depicts the USS Wadsworth escorting a convoy, having just deployed a depth charge.

Their suggested reverse, NVY-R-3, features the World War I era Navy emblem.

CCAC and CFA Recommended Navy Silver Medal Reverse Design

Recommended Navy Silver Medal Reverse Design

For their selected designs, the CCAC suggested moving much of the medal’s text from the obverse to the reverse. The CFA recommended further coordination of fonts for their pairing.

Navy Medal Design Candidates

The three Navy medal obverse candidates and U.S. Mint descriptions of them follow.

Navy Silver Medal Design Candidates - Obverses

Navy Silver Medal Design Candidates – Obverses

NVY-O-01 depicts a four-piper destroyer targeting an enemy submarine by launching depth charges off the stern with an additional depth charge exploding in the background. In the sky, kite balloons patrol for submarines and other dangers.

NVY-O-02 depicts the USS Wadsworth escorting a convoy, having just deployed a depth charge.

NVY-O-03 features the USS Fanning, an iconic four-piper destroyer, in "razzle-dazzle" camouflage paint. U.S. sailors from a nearby ship look on. Note: The Navy used "razzle-dazzle" camouflage paint (a series of random geometric shapes) during WWI in an effort to confuse the bow and stern of a ship, thereby making its direction harder to detect.

The three Navy medal reverse candidates and U.S. Mint descriptions of them follow.

Navy Silver Medal Design Candidates - Reverses

Navy Silver Medal Design Candidates – Reverses

NVY-R-01 features American soldiers disembarking from a troop transport, representing the Navy’s critical role in the protection of troops and equipment. Below, a four-piper destroyer commands the seas as it escorts a military convoy in the distance. The additional inscription refers to a famous quote attributed to Commander Joseph K. Taussig. When the first U.S. Naval destroyer division arrived in Queenstown, Ireland, the British commander asked Cmdr. Taussig when his squadron would be ready for service. Purportedly, he replied "We are ready now, sir," further underscoring America’s commitment to the war effort.

NVY-R-02 depicts the USS Conyngham, representing U.S. Naval Destroyers arriving at Queenstown, Ireland, in May 1917, with the World War I era Navy emblem in the field. Additional inscriptions include "RETURN OF THE MAYFLOWER," and "WE ARE READY NOW, SIR."

NVY-R-3 showcases the World War I era Navy emblem.

2018 World War I Armed Forces Silver Medals

Artists for the U.S. Mint created over 60 design candidates for the five 2018 World War I Armed Forces Silver Medals. The other medals will honor the Army (see Army medal designs), Air Service (see Air Service medal designs), Marines (see Marines medal designs) and Coast Guard (see Coast Guard medal designs).

There is a chance for one more medal as the CCAC asked for a sixth to celebrate women whom served during the war.

{ 10 comments… read them below or add one }

joera March 28, 2017 at 6:46 pm

I have a son-in-law that has been in the military for over 20 years. I’ll be getting a set for him.

Concerned March 28, 2017 at 7:05 pm

This appears to be more US Mint overindulgence in ripping off John B. Collector with another needless product with not one extra medal but five extra medals plus whatever commerative coins will be made. Reminds me of the National Wildlife Medals- how much value did they incur? I’m tired of the excess junk the mint produces. It’s not worth it anymore, after 50 years of collecting I’m done.

paul March 28, 2017 at 7:44 pm

As a Viet Nam Veteran I am disappointed that the government would take all this time to recognize these Vets who all are not with us.I would be interested what the mint is going to do with the surcharges. Lets hope it will go to erect a decent memorial for these long gone Vets.

jim March 28, 2017 at 11:47 pm

I don’t collect medals, only coin of the realm so if the mint feels it’s necessary to make up new medals then I don’t care. Sometimes I think they’re just busy work for the artists, engravers, etc. that are on staff and have nothing else to do.

A&L Futures March 29, 2017 at 2:46 pm

@ EVERYONE (THIS IS HUGE) MASSIVE — INSANE

Item Number: 17RF
Mintage Limit: None
Product Limit: 75,000
Household Order Limit: None

https://catalog.usmint.gov/congratulations-set-2017-17RF.html?cgid=product-schedule

jim March 29, 2017 at 5:42 pm

A&L Futures –
What? The coin is the same price as without the packaging and $1 for the card; probably cheaper than if you went to the Hallmark store and bought a card separately. What’s missing is an envelope to send the “set” in. And it’s not much of a “set” since there’s only the one coin in the “set”. But quite an overreaction.

Pat H March 29, 2017 at 6:02 pm

jim – The BIG deal is that this is a San Francisco minted ASE, not West Point.

Seth Riesling March 29, 2017 at 7:22 pm

jim, A&L Futures & Mike Unser FYI –

The congratulations set mentioned will have a “S” Mint mark ASE $1 coin in it for the first time instead of a “W” Mint mark coin. The coin will also be included in the 2017 Limited Edition silver Proof set which in the past going back to 2012 has always had a “W” Proof ASE $1. That is the new news from the Mint.
The Mint will also go against their own rules since 2014 & will sell the $100 gold African-American Liberty high relief coin over the counter at its 3 sales centers in DC, Denver & Philadelphia on April 6 at noon Eastern time with no household limits!

-NumisDudeTX

Robert F Hall March 29, 2017 at 10:23 pm

The medals will be done in silver instead of bronze. That is a big change. Now the 2016 Liberty Medal is the first silver medal ever done? I think so. Thank you!

Seth Riesling March 29, 2017 at 10:47 pm

Robert F. Hall –

The US Mint has issued many official silver medals over recent years that most don’t know about including the Ben Franklin firefighters silver medals, the Young Astronauts Program silver medals, the Roosevelt Wildlife Refuge System sliver medals (the first product the Mint ever used laser technology to produce) & most recently the 2011 National 9-11 silver medals & the American Liberty low relief silver medals.

-NumisDudeTX

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