Canadian 2017 $20 Polar Bear Coin Uses Diamond Glitter for Snow and Ice

by Rhonda Kay on October 24, 2016 · 7 comments

For the first time, the Royal Canadian Mint produced and is selling a polar bear silver coin that uses diamond particles to recreate the glittering effect of daylight snow and ice.

2017 $20 Polar Bear 1 oz. Silver Coin with Diamond Glitter - Obverse and Reverse

2017 $20 Polar Bear 1 oz. Silver Coin with Diamond Glitter – Obverse and Reverse

Limited to 7,500 and struck in an ounce of 99.99% pure silver to collector proof quality, the bear’s Artic landscape appears to come to life when the coin is turned to catch the light.

"A dusting of fine diamond particles was carefully applied to your coin to ensure an even layering over the select design elements," the Mint promotes.

The coin’s reverse artistry is the work of Glen Loates. His design depicts a standing polar bear as it moves across rugged terrain. Selective coloring highlights the snow-covered hills in the background and special diamond glitter simulates the snow and ice underfoot. Inscriptions include 20 DOLLARS and GL for the artist’s initials.

2017 $20 Polar Bear 1 oz. Silver Coin with Diamond Glitter - Reverse

Another view of the reverse

Obverses feature Susanna Blunt’s effigy of Queen Elizabeth II and have inscriptions of ELIZABETH II, CANADA, D G REGINA, and 2017.

Royal Canadian Mint-provided coin specifications include:

  • Mintage: 7,500
  • Composition: 99.99% pure silver
  • Finish: proof
  • Weight (g): 31.39
  • Diameter (mm): 38
  • Edge: serrated
  • Certificate: serialized
  • Face value: 20 dollars
  • Reverse Artist: Glen Loates
  • Obverse Artist: Susanna Blunt

Ordering

Priced at CAD $114.95, or about US $86, the 2017 $20 Polar Bear 1 oz. Silver Coin is available from the Royal Canadian Mint at mint.ca. An affiliate link to the coin’s product page is right here.

Each coin is encapsulated and presented in a Royal Canadian Mint-branded maroon clamshell with a black beauty box.

{ 7 comments… read them below or add one }

drew scott October 24, 2016 at 11:37 am

Wow, I think that coin (including their 2017 Snowflake coin) looks truly amazing.

Mouse October 24, 2016 at 5:47 pm

Definitely eye appealing. If I was not stacking silver right now, I would buy one for my collection.

Seth Riesling October 24, 2016 at 6:02 pm

Mouse –

On a different subject – gold. Did you read the news article a few weeks ago about the RCM employee that stole nearly $1 million of gold by hiding it in his bum? Creative!

-NumisDudeTX

Mouse October 24, 2016 at 6:13 pm

Hi Seth,

I did lol the guy was your typical criminal…a dumb ass. He sold the gold at a gold buyer next to his bank where he cashed the checks…the same bank that he used for direct deposit of his RCM paychecks as well lol he is all set for a bit of federal time in the big house…well his ass definitely is lol He will be the most popular inmate on his cell block lol

Cheers,

Mouse

Seth Riesling October 24, 2016 at 6:56 pm

Mouse –

LOL. They will be drilling his bum for gold daily in jail for sure!

-NumisDudeTX

Mammoth October 24, 2016 at 8:19 pm

It sounds like his scheme backfired, no buts about it…

RODNEY MOORE October 26, 2016 at 4:12 pm

They left something fairly important out in the article: the method used to attach the diamonds. I wonder if it is glued/epoxied or some other method. I wouldn’t want a glued or painted coin. I also wonder if the diamonds are natural crystals or have been faceted or otherwise processed to reflect light.
This coin is of particular interest to me because I am a mineral collector and miner. It is how I make a living and collecting coins is something that I have recently taking up again after buying silver eagles when I was a teen ager.
If anyone is interested in the process of digging gemstones in the USA I have linked my website (which I have never done before in past comments).

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