Reagan, Ford and Nixon $1 Coins Released in Proof Set

by Mike Unser on February 16, 2016 · 8 comments

Today, Feb. 16, the U.S. Mint opened sales of its last proof set with coins wholly dedicated to United States presidents.

Photos of Reagan, Ford and Nixon Presidential $1 Proof Coins

Photos of Reagan, Ford and Nixon Presidential $1 Proof Coins

The Mint’s Presidential $1 Coin Program, which started in 2007 and honors deceased presidents, is now in its 10th and final year. This year’s set holds the last three dollars — each in special collector proof quality. They feature former commander-in-chief’s Reagan, Ford and Nixon with surrounding portrait inscriptions and designer information following:

  • RICHARD M. NIXON, IN GOD WE TRUST, 37th PRESIDENT and 1969-1974. Designed and sculpted by Don Everhart.

  • GERALD R. FORD, IN GOD WE TRUST, 38th PRESIDENT and 1974-1977. Designed and sculpted by Phebe Hemphill.

  • RONALD REAGAN, IN GOD WE TRUST, 40th PRESIDENT and 1981-1989. Designed by Richard Masters and sculpted by Joseph Menna.

Coins in collector proof quality offer sharp, frosted designs that attractively contrast against their mirror-like fields. Proof coins are made by coining presses that strike hand-polished dies against specially treated metal blanks. In addition, standard coins for circulation are pressed one time while proof coins are struck at least twice, giving them sharper detail.

Reverse images are common across the dollar series. They showcase Don Everhart’s rendition of the Statue of Liberty with surrounding inscriptions of UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and $1.

Proof Presidential $1 Coin, Reverse Side

Proof Presidential $1 Coin, reverse side

Unlike most U.S. coinage, Presidential dollars have flat edges. Incused lettering is added to the edge denoting the coin’s year of issue, the mint mark for the U.S. Mint facility of origin, and the motto "E PLURIBUS UNUM."

Edge View of Lens Holding 2015 Presidential $1 Proof Coins

The protective case or lens of the proof set allows for viewing of dollar edges

All three of the set’s dollars bear the "S" mint mark to signify their production at the United States Mint facility in San Francisco. As an aside, CoinNews.net visited the San Francisco Mint late last year and captured photos of the three proof dollars.

To protect their finish, coins of the proof set are held within a clear protective case or lens.

Coins and Packaging of 2016 Presidential $1 Coin Proof Set

United States Mint images of the dollar coins and packaging of 2016 Presidential $1 Coin Proof Set

Lens and coins from 2015 Presidential $1 Coin Proof Set

This photo shows the protective lens holding last year’s proof $1’s honoring Truman, Ike, JFK and LBJ

The lens ships inside a presidential-themed box along with a U.S. Mint certificate of authenticity.

Ordering

Priced at $17.95, order a 2016 Presidential $1 Coin Proof Set directly from the U.S. Mint website located here, or call 1-800-USA-MINT (872-6468). There are no product limits or household ordering restrictions.

Based on trends from the past few years, sales should exceed 230,000 sets with over 110,000 sold in the next few days.

{ 8 comments… read them below or add one }

jim February 16, 2016 at 12:19 pm

Oh Oh, another opportunity for a packaging misprint. Hopefully somebody checked the order and made sure the right presidents were depicted on the packaging before ordering 230,000.

Boz February 16, 2016 at 3:22 pm

Oops, misspelled Nixun.

Jp February 16, 2016 at 6:29 pm

Does anyone know if there will be any type of replacement for these $1 coins going forward? (Seth?) I know they are not made for circulation(as are the Native American Indian). I assume they will still make the Indian coins next year, or will that also end? If they will only be making the Indian coins, you would think the Mint would come up with another $1 replacement?
I have always liked the reverse on these coins. If they end this for good, I hope they find another coin to use the reverse from this one. Just my oooo pin yun!
Boz- Nixon is spelled … Nixin. I’m sure of it. Really! : )

jim February 17, 2016 at 9:29 am

They’ve probably got one ready for Jimmy Carter, just waitin…

Seth Riesling February 17, 2016 at 5:42 pm

Jp –

There is no replacement $1 coin for after this year so far in Congress as far as the Presidential $1 coins go. The Native American Indian $1 coin program from 2009 till this year with different reverse designs each year, if I remember right, may end in 2019 unless Congress extends it, which I hope they do because most of their reverse designs have been great. Of course, no $1 coins have been issued for circulation since December 13, 2011 when then Secretary of the Treasury Timothy F. Geithner signed an order to stop the Mint from issuing anymore $1 coins of any kind for circulation. It would take an act of Congress signed by the President to change that situation. As it is now there are more than $1 billion $1 coins sitting in a Federal Reserve Bank new $600,000 building in Dallas built just to hold these coins in its large bank vault! They can’t be melted down either because the Fed banks ordered them & the Mint issued them & made the seigniorage profit on them for the U.S. Treasury General Fund. Crazy!

-NumisDudeTX

Jp February 18, 2016 at 4:58 am

Well …
That’s a whole lotta coinage sitting there. I’m sure in 10-15 years the TV coin guys will be able to tap into that “Lost hoard of Gold Presidential coins” to be able to unload on the public for a hefty profit. It’s the American way!
Short answer is a No on the $1 coins. Ok well said.

Jp February 18, 2016 at 4:59 am

Well …
That’s a whole lotta coinage sitting there. I’m sure in 10-15 years the TV coin guys will be able to tap into that “Lost hoard of Gold Presidential coins” to be able to unload on the public for a hefty profit. It’s the American way!
Short answer is a No on the $1 coins. Ok well said. Thanks NumisDudeTX

Barry February 19, 2016 at 11:47 am

A poor design portrayal on the Reagan coin. I won’t be buying the set.

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