2016 National Park Service Commemorative Coin Images

by Rhonda Kay on December 31, 2015 · 12 comments

The United States Mint published images of six coins commemorating the centennial of the National Park Service (NPS). Their designs were originally unveiled on Nov. 19, 2015 during a ceremony at the U.S. Department of the Interior in Washington, DC.

2016 National Park Service 100th Anniversary Commemorative Coins

2016 National Park Service 100th Anniversary Commemorative Coins — $5 Gold, Silver Dollar and Clad Half-Dollar

Featuring portraits, emblems, and iconic landscapes, the 2016 National Park Service 100th Anniversary Commemorative Coins will launch on Mar. 24, 2016 in collector proof and uncirculated finishes. Their quantities include up to 100,000 $5 gold coins; 500,000 silver dollars; and 750,000 clad half-dollars, but consumer demand will determine how many are actually made.

$5 Gold Coins

Both $5 gold coins are made at the West Point Mint and carry the ‘W’ mint mark. Below are images of the proof and uncirculated editions. Their obverse (heads side) features John Muir and Theodore Roosevelt with Yosemite National Park’s Half Dome in the background.

2016-W $5 Proof National Park Service Commemorative Gold Coin

2016-W $5 Proof NPS Commemorative Gold Coin

2016-W $5 Uncirculated National Park Service Commemorative Gold Coin

2016-W $5 Uncirculated NPS Commemorative Gold Coin

The $5 gold coin reverse (tails side) features the NPS logo.

Gold Obverse
Designer: Don Everhart
Engraver: Don Everhart

Gold Reverse
Designer: Don Everhart
Engraver: Don Everhart

Silver Dollars

Both silver dollars are struck at the Philadelphia Mint and bear the ‘P’ mint mark. Below are images of the proof and uncirculated editions. Their obverses feature Yellowstone National Park’s Old Faithful geyser and a bison.

2016-P Proof National Park Service Silver Dollar

2016-P Proof NPS Silver Dollar

2016-P Uncirculated National Park Service Silver Dollar

2016-P Uncirculated NPS Silver Dollar

Their reverses depict a Latina Folklórico dancer and the NPS logo, representing the multi-faceted cultural experience found in America’s national parks.

Silver Obverse
Designer: Joseph Menna
Engraver: Joseph Menna

Silver Reverse
Designer: Chris Costello
Engraver: Jim Licaretz

Clad Half-Dollars

Production duties are shared for the two half-dollars. Proofs are made at the San Francisco Mint and have the ‘S’ mint mark while uncirculated editions are struck at the Denver Mint and carry the ‘D’ mint mark. Below are images of the proof and uncirculated editions. Their obverses feature a hiker discovering the majesty of the wilderness and a small child discovering a frog hiding in ferns, which celebrates the diversity and breadth of the NPS.

2016-S Proof National Park Service Clad Half-Dollar

2016-S Proof NPS Clad Half-Dollar

2016-D Uncirculated National Park Service Clad Half-Dollar

2016-D Uncirculated NPS Clad Half-Dollar

The clad half-dollar reverse features the NPS logo.

Clad Obverse
Designer: Barbara Fox
Engraver: Michael Gaudioso

Clad Reverse
Designer: Thomas Hipschen
Engraver: Charles L. Vickers

Coin Prices

Pricing for the $5 gold coins will not be announced until shortly before they’re released. The U.S. Mint will establish those based on an average of LBMA gold prices. Introductory and regular prices for the $1 silver and 50c clad coins follow:

  Introductory Prices
(approx. first 30 days)
Regular Prices
NPS Silver Proof Dollar $45.95 $50.95
NPS Silver Uncirculated Dollar $44.95 $49.95
NPS Proof Half-Dollar $21.95 $25.95
NPS Uncirculated Half-Dollars $20.95 $24.95

 

Prices of the commemorative coins include (Public Law 113-291 mandated) surcharges of $35 for each gold coin, $10 for each silver coin and $5 for each half-dollar. The law authorizes the surcharges to be paid to the National Park Foundation for projects that help preserve and protect resources under the stewardship of the NPS and promote public enjoyment and appreciation of these resources.

{ 12 comments… read them below or add one }

Jp December 31, 2015 at 8:57 am

I like the gold but it’s no sale for me on the silver and clad. I don’t see big sales of these coins.

Keep Calm & Stack On December 31, 2015 at 12:48 pm

Thanks Rhonda, appreciate the update! Yeah, the clad prices are out to lunch.

If you receive the updated (final as 1200 pm yesterday) sales numbers on the US Marshal’s, could you post those please –

Munzen December 31, 2015 at 8:24 pm

Jp – I agree about the dollar and 50¢ designs so it’s the half-eagle for me as well. Hopefully the price of gold will stay down for the next few months….

Seth Riesling December 31, 2015 at 9:59 pm

Mrs. Rhonda (Kay) Unser –

Thanks for the update! I was looking at the NPS commemorative coin photos on the Mint’s website before i read your blog on the subject. The mock-up design versions revealed on November 19 didn’t do justice to the designs. Originally I didn’t care much for the $5 gold coin design, but seeing the actual photos on the Mint’s website I changed my mind. I noticed also that the bison on the bottom of the NPS arrowhead logo is incused on the $5 gold coins & $1 silver coins but is raised on the clad half dollar coins. Interesting design element. Also, as far as prices go, this might be the first time a “modetn” (since 1983) commemirative silver dollar Proof version is only $1 more than the Uncirculated version! But the raise of $7 per clad half dollar from the 2015 clad commemorative half dollars is a tragedy for Young Numismatists IMHO. The U.S. Mint should be ashamed on that point, but from comments that U.S. Mint Principal Deputy Director Matthew Rhett Jeppson has said he basically doesn’t give much thought about numismatists per se (he is not a numismatist). I can only hope (and have contacted my Senators & congressman about him) that he is never confirmed by the Senate as our first U.S. Mint Director since the last one left in 2011 to work with PCGS & other numismstic advertisers! Obama’s first nominee, Bibiana Boeria, former head of Jaguar Corporation was a great candidate but had to move on due to inaction in the U.S. Senate. This guy is a bureaucratic insider & pencil pusher who actually told a audience at the last ANA coin show that he doesn’t care what dealers on tv shows do with U.S. Mint products including fraud! How irresponsible is that attitude?! Anyway, i really like the clad half dollar design too & my 4 nephews will be getting sets of those in both versions.
Happy New Year numismatists!

-NumisDudeTX

unai January 1, 2016 at 6:29 pm

The silver and clad offer some of the ugliest coin designs yet.
The gold is not great, but next to the other designs… not so bad.
Been buying the commemorative coins, but seeing the work being produced, I just feel I am going to have to cherry pick the ones I like. Not about to give money for things I don’t like for the sake of collecting.
the geyser and the buffalo are just horrible and hard to look at.
just my opinion.

William Farias January 4, 2016 at 8:33 am

I agree, I don,t see Big sales on the Silver Dallas and Clad half . For me the details on the Coins ,,Not that great at all ? I feel that the workmen ship ,,, Well let’s say,, Don’t catch my Eye ,At all !! And the price??? .

Tinto January 4, 2016 at 1:09 pm

@William Farias

IMO their “workmanship” suck and it has been for a long time for many of the coins. It is too bad the Mint is a monopoly and have no incentive to change since I’d guess most of their real efforts are geared towards catering to the big dealers/buyers and to the sale of bullion to AP’s.

RonnieBGood January 7, 2016 at 6:50 pm

You have all captured my sentiments as well on the silver & clad versions.

James Penne January 18, 2016 at 8:48 am

I’ll probably do the clad half dollars. You all talk about practices at the U.S. Mint, so like it or not I’ll voice mine on these National Parks Coins. I’m somewhat hurt by the Latina Folklorico on the dollar Coin. I’ve been to a great many national parks from Arcadia National Park in Maine to National Parks in Utah, Arizona, Washington, Virginia, well I’ve been to lots of them in my life time and I fail to understand the whole Latina thing. Many of our National Parks all have ties to our Native Americans and not one iota is given mention to them. The U.S. Mint should be ashamed of itself.

Bryan March 15, 2016 at 10:44 pm

All three designs are great, especially the half. I think it’s really cool how Muirs beard and Roosevelts coat fade into the bottom of the coin. And I also agree with the person who mentioned the Latina dancer being on the silver $1, why??? And the font for “$1” is horrible. The italics look awful

Coin B March 30, 2016 at 7:13 pm

I will stick with the current American Eagle’s design. What on earth is the design that looks like a stick of broccoli ? The other designs are cluttered rather than classically designed with elegant simplicity.

qubit July 19, 2016 at 11:51 pm

Wow. That cauliflower coin is the worst. And it features a poorly chosen and poorly rendered bison. Instead of using artistry to depict a geyser and bison, the designer seemed to have just copied some random photo. Seriously looks like he projected an image on a piece of paper, outlined it with a pen, and there you have it.

And it’s paired with an irrelevant Latin folk dancer on the reverse.

The US Mint really makes some of the ugliest coins of the 21st century.

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