Homestead Five Ounce Silver Coin Photos

by Mike Unser on March 20, 2015 · 7 comments

The year’s first 2015 America the Beautiful Five Ounce Silver Coins are out. Sold by the United States Mint, they’re very similar, yet different. Sharing a design symbolic of Homestead National Monument of American in Nebraska, there’s the bullion version intended for investors that launched on Feb. 17 and the uncirculated edition for collectors that went on sale March 5. This article presents a photo overview of the two.

Photos of bullion and collector Homestead National Monument Five Ounce Silver Coins

Here are several photos of bullion and collector Homestead National Monument Five Ounce Silver Coins. At this writing, U.S. Mint sales of the bullion piece are at 28,000 while the collectible version has sales of 17,257.

First, let’s discuss some similarities between the two coins. Common to both are their designs, three-inch diameters, and their edge-incused weight and purity of .999 FINE SILVER 5.0 OUNCE.

2015 Homestead 5 Oz Silver Coin Edges

This photo shows the incused edge letterings on America the Beautiful Five Ounce Silver Coins — edges on bullion and uncirculated editions are the same

Now, let’s talk about their obvious visual differences. The bullion version has a brilliant finish while the collector edition has an uncirculated finish. (See how both five-ounce coins are made.)

2015 Homestead 5 Oz Silver Bullion and Uncirculated Coins, Reverses

Here’s a photo of 2015 Homestead Five Ounce Silver Coins — the bullion version is shown left and the collector uncirculated edition is right

Then there’s a less obvious difference. While the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia strikes both, only the collector version has a denoting “P” mint mark on its obverse.

2015 Homestead 5 Oz Silver Bullion and Uncirculated Coins, Obverses

Here is a photo of the obverse or heads side of America the Beautiful Five Ounce Silver Coins. The bullion version is left and the collector uncirculated edition, which carries a ‘P’ mint mark below ‘IN GOD WE TRUST’, is right.

Also, collector uncirculated coins ship in special U.S. Mint-branded packaging along with certificates of authenticity.

2015-P Homestead 5 Oz Silver Uncirculated Coin, Case and Certificate

A photo of the U.S. Mint-branded packaging and contents of collectible five-ounce silver uncirculated coins

Homestead 5 Oz Silver Uncirculated Coin, Certificate of Authenticity

Certificate of Authenticity

Homestead 5 Oz Silver Uncirculated Coin Specifications

5-Ounce Coin Specifications

The U.S. government guarantees the weight, content and purity of bullion coins but these coins don’t have certificates. They also don’t have special packaging. Instead, the U.S. Mint delivers them in 10-coin tubes held in 100-coin monster boxes.

Monster Box and 10-Coin Tubes for America the Beautiful Five Ounce Bullion Coins

Here’s a photo of a blue monster box and its 10-coin tubes for America the Beautiful Five Ounce Bullion Coins

Both versions share the Homestead quarter design, Ronald D. Sanders’ representation of the three fundamentals of survival common to all homesteaders: food, shelter, and water.

2015 Homestead National Monument of America Silver Quarter

Photo of a Homestead silver quarter that shipped inside the U.S. Mint’s earlier released 2015 America the Beautiful Quarters Silver Proof Set. Notice its design is the same as the three-inch, five-ounce silver coins. Quarter edges are reeded, different from the flat edges found on five-ounce silver coins.


2015 Homestead 5 Oz Silver Bullion and Uncirculated Coins, Reverses-a

Another camera angle of the two five-ounce coins

Bullion coins are sold through the U.S. Mint’s network of Authorized Purchasers. Coin and precious dealers sell them for around $3-$5 per ounce over the spot price of silver. The collector uncirculated silver coin is available directly from the U.S. Mint at www.usmint.gov/catalog for $149.95.

Here are two larger photos of both sides of the collectible Homestead uncirculated silver coin:

2015-P Homestead National Monument of America Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated Coin, Reverse

2015-P Homestead National Monument of America Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated Coin, Reverse

2015-P Homestead National Monument of America Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated Coin, Obverse

2015-P Homestead National Monument of America Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated Coin, Obverse

And finally, here are two bigger photos of both sides of the Homestead bullion silver coin:

2015 Homestead National Monument of America Five Ounce Silver Bullion Coin, Reverse

2015 Homestead National Monument of America Five Ounce Silver Bullion Coin, Reverse

2015-P Homestead National Monument of America Five Ounce Silver Bullion Coin, Obverse

2015-P Homestead National Monument of America Five Ounce Silver Bullion Coin, Obverse

{ 7 comments… read them below or add one }

vadim March 20, 2015 at 8:39 pm

The uncerculated version is sold out! Did they really sold all in just 15 days? What are the sales numbers on them?

Mike March 21, 2015 at 8:25 am

I just went to the Mint’s web site and they’re still on sale. In this article it states that they went on sale 03/05 the article is dated 03/20, that’s 15 days with a stated sale of uncirculated sale of 17,257. With a mintage limit of 30,000 that’s 12,743 to go. If you are concerned about not getting a piece in the future be a subscriber and you will get yours before they go on sale to the open market. I’ve had mine for a few days. The one thing I can never figure out is this mintage limit vs. product limit (none) unless they are indicating that to be bullion sales, which probably stops at a year end stop date. I may have answered my own question. I just find the Mints vernacular contradictory.

vadim March 21, 2015 at 11:13 am

Mike

Yesterday evening us mint website had indicated that the they were out of stock. Now they have them, and they will be ready for shipping on April 30. I was a subscriber until I disabled that option due to unavailable funds at the moment. Coin collecting is addictive as you may know; therefore, I’m trying to postpone and combine as possible. I think you got it regarding product limit and mintage limit.

RonnieBGood March 21, 2015 at 2:15 pm

Hi Guys,
Hope I can help you with understanding the Mintage limits vs Product limits.

The mintage limit is across all products. And the product limit is with regards to just one product. Still confused. I would be. Lets break it down:

Lets use the Gold American Eagle Proof series as an example. Lets say that the Mintage Limit on the One Ounce Gold American Eagle is 50,000. Now the One Ounce is sold separately and in the 4 piece set and lets say this is an anniversary year and they also have the One Ounce in a special set. Now across all of these sets they can mint no more than 50,000 coins. This is the Mintage limit. They can further limit the coins in the anniversary set by setting a product limit of 10,000 within this set. This 10,000 Product Limit is only in the Anniversary set and when it sells out it leaves 40,000 to be sold in any combination between the individual One Ounce and the One Ounce in the 4 Piece Set (one ounce, half ounce, quarter and tenth ounce coin set). If the One Ounce sets sell 35,000 and the Anniversary Set sells 10,000, the 4 piece set can only sell 5,000 sets. This adds up to the total mintage limit of 50,000 (35,000 + 10,000 + 5,000 = 50,000). A Product limit is just a way to further limit the number of coins produced within the Mintage Limit.

Hope this helps.
Cheers, Ronnie

Mike March 21, 2015 at 4:02 pm

Thank you Ronnie, I take it the bullion coinage doesn’t figure into any of this.

Mike Unser March 22, 2015 at 12:19 pm

I asked Adam Stump, deputy director of the U.S. Mint’s Office of Corporate Communications, about total Homestead 5 oz coin mintages. This is his response:

“The current authorized limit for both numismatic and bullion 2015 America the Beautiful Five Ounce Silver Coins for Homestead National Monument of America is 65,000 coins across both options. An announced maximum mintage limit of 30,000 coins has been issued for the America the Beautiful 5 Ounce Homestead Uncirculated Coin. However, based on demand, the U.S. Mint has the flexibility to mint and issue more than the minimum of 35,000 America the Beautiful 5 Ounce Homestead Silver bullion Coins so long as we do not exceed the 65,000 coin limit.”

Mike March 22, 2015 at 12:53 pm

In other words if the total sales of uncirculated coins does not or appears to not make their limit, then the adjustment to bullion can increase. Based on history most uncirculated if not all ATB 5oz coins do meet their limit so that adjustment to bullion is a rare occurrence, one that requires close attention to the existing years trend and if done at all would be in the waining days of the sales envelope (usually approaching the next years release date). To gauge that choice I assume would be a tenuous decision because I suspect that there would be a sales spike at the end of any coins availability.

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