US Mint Pricing for Silver Coins May Rise

by Mike Unser on August 16, 2013 · 8 comments

There appears a strong possibility that the United States Mint could temporarily suspend some of its silver products for collectors and eventually raise their prices.

2013 American Silver Eagles and 2013 Silver Proof Set

The proof and uncirculated 2013 American Silver Eagles and 2013 Silver Proof Set are among US Mint silver coins and sets poised for prices increases

There is no set formula published by the U.S. Mint that offers collectors a look into how it prices its numismatic silver products or when those prices will change — unlike its guide for numismatic gold and platinum coins.

In the past when the market value of silver has changed significantly, the U.S. Mint has tended to freeze ordering on certain silver coins and silver sets, publish new prices on the Federal Register and then adjust prices on the products and re-enable ordering. This process can take days to weeks.

The U.S. Mint last brought prices down on nine silver products on July 11, 2013. Precipitating the change was when silver in late June plummeted several percentage points to $18.67 an ounce which was its lowest level since August 2010.

Silver has been on a tear this week. The U.S. Mint tends to watch London precious metals fixings. The London silver Fix ended July at $19.94 an ounce. The latest fixing today is $22.83, which is $2.89, or 14.5% higher. For the week alone, it has jumped $2.52, or 12.4%. Further, the precious metal is continuing to gain with its spot price at $23.27 an ounce as of this writing. This is near or nearing the level that could trigger the events described above.

Silver coins likely to get caught up in a pricing event are the same ones that were most recently reduced. Namely, any products with uncirculated or proof 2013 American Silver Eagles, the 2013 Silver Proof Set, the 2012-2013 America the Beautiful Silver Proof Sets and all the America the Beautiful Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated Coins.

This article will get updated if any news breaks on silver products.

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Boz
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Boz

A price hike would be premature. The temporary runup was due to the good jobs report, with too much good news scaring investor types out of stocks and into physicals.

Today there should be enough bad news, such from as Macy, Walmart, and Target, indicating that yes, Virginia, we are still in an economic slump.

wdg5
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wdg5

Yeah right! As soon as talks about Fed’s tapering starts to gather momentum, PM prices will correct further. Mint is proactive about raising prices now but drag its feet until Silver goes below $15.

Kevin
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Kevin

Yes, premature and unwarranted. But one day, $50 silver will seem cheap. Wish I had extra $ to deploy. It would be in silver over gold.

RonnieBGood
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RonnieBGood

More justification for a pricing grid for Silver similar to what the Mint already has for Gold and Platinum Coins.

george glazener
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george glazener

Hmmmm, keep Lucy or sell Lucy. That is the question….

RonnieBGood
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RonnieBGood

Hi George,
Gold will go to $1450 when the Bond buying is reduced in September.
Put it up for sale when you see Gold move above $1400 mark.

george glazener
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george glazener

Sounds like a plan. Thanks Ronnie…!

Kahoola
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Kahoola

Got my two West Point sets today. One set looked like it was tampered with, box upside down in sleeve. On exam the enhanced unc. had a strike through, the rev. proof had gunk on the bottom of the union shield. Suspect that somebody returned a unit & did not mention the marks. The mint guys did a cursory check then put in the next outgoing order. Always suspected that some people are returning faulty units, not making note, and the mint ships them out. Tough luck for the guy getting the faulty unit. You really do need to inspect mint purchases and if needed, send back pronto.