Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential $1 Dollar Coin Cover Available

by Rhonda Kay on October 5, 2011 · 6 comments

The United States Mint released the Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Dollar Coin Cover on Tuesday, October 4, for $19.95.

Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Dollar Coin Cover

United States Mint image of the Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Dollar Coin Cover

A popular collector product, the coin cover includes two circulation quality dollar coins chosen from the first day of production. One Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential $1 Coin is from the US Mint facility in Denver and the other is from Philadelphia. Both were struck on June 1, 2011. These coins are mounted on a display card with a U.S. 44-cent postage stamp.

A portrait of the president is on the front of the coin cover with the American flag in the background. Each is postmarked August 18, 2011, Fremont, OH, marking the day that the Rutherford B. Hayes $1 Coins were released into circulation.

Limited Edition & Sales Expectations

The United States Mint is limiting the Hayes Presidential Dollar Coin Cover to 22,000.

The product is expected to sell well based on previous issues in the series. As an example, according to the United States Mint sales figures as of October 3, 2011, collectors have purchased 16,510 of the Ulysses S. Grant Coin Covers since its launch on June 29 and 31,425 of the Abraham Lincoln Coin Covers since December 30, 2010.

Coin Designs

A circular window on the decorative card reveals the obverse and reverse designs of the coins.

Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Dollar Coin

Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Dollar Coin

The obverse or heads side of the $1 was designed and sculpted by Don Everhart. It depicts a portrait of the president and the inscriptions "RUTHERFORD B. HAYES," "IN GOD WE TRUST," "19TH PRESIDENT" and "1877-1881."

Everhart also designed the image of the Statue of Liberty shown on the reverse of all of the Presidential $1 coins. Its inscriptions include "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" and "$1."

The coins’ edges include "2011," "E PLURIBUS UNUM," and the mint mark "D" for Denver or "P" for Philadelphia to indicate its origin.

Rutherford B. Hayes: 19th President, 19th in Presidential $1 Coin Series

Rutherford B. Hayes served in the military during the Civil War as a brevet major general. His first political success was winning a seat in the House of Representatives in 1865 and then serving as Governor of Ohio for three terms between 1867 and 1876.

In the presidential election, he lost the popular vote, but via the Electoral Commission established by Congress in January 1877 to settle the fiercely disputed election, he won the presidency by just one electoral vote.

He announced in advance that he would only serve one term as President, but in that one term he brought about moderate reform, withdrew troops from the South, and banned wine and liquor from the White House.

Upcoming and Past US Mint Presidential Dollar Product Releases

President Hayes’ dollar is the third for the year and the 19th in the Presidential dollar series that started in 2007. The United States Mint began selling Rutherford B. Hayes dollar 25-coin rolls on August 18, the same day as the Federal Reserve Bank started distributing them into circulation.

Hayes Presidential $1 Coin & First Spouse Medal Set

Hayes Presidential $1 Coin & First Spouse Medal Set

Another Mint product to feature Hayes this year was the Hayes Presidential $1 Coin & First Spouse Medal Set that launched on September 22.

In the Presidential $1 Coin series, four past presidents are honored each year. Beginning in 2007, the first designs featured images of George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison. The next four dollars in 2008 celebrated James Monroe, John Quincy Adams, Andrew Jackson and Martin Van Buren. The 2009 issues honored William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, James K. Polk and Zachary Taylor. The 2010 dollars depicted Millard Fillmore, Franklin Pierce, James Buchanan and Abraham Lincoln.

2011 $1 coins started with the release honoring Andrew Johnson on February 17 and Ulysses S. Grant on May 19. One more Presidential dollar will follow this year. The James Garfield $1 Coin is expected to enter circulation on November 17, and his Presidential Dollar Coin Cover is scheduled to launch on December 29. The upcoming release dates are subject to change per the Mint.

Hayes $1 Mintages

Production of Presidential dollars are intended for use in daily transactions, and the United States Mint published the Hayes $1 mintages last month. The coins have a combined Philadelphia and Denver mintage of 74.48 million, which happens to tie them with the Millard Fillmore coin for the third least produced in the series. Their combined mintage trails behind the 2011 Andrew Johnson $1 at 72.66 million and the 2010 James Buchanan $1 at 73.36 million.

Order Coin Covers from US Mint

The coin covers may be purchased directly from the United States Mint website at:

United States Mint Product page

In addition to the $19.95 price, a domestic order is charged a $4.95 shipping and handling fee. No household limits are in place, meaning buyers can order as many as they like.

The covers may also be ordered using the Mint’s toll-free number, 1-800-USA-MINT (872-6468). The Mint indicates it expects shipping to take one to two weeks, which usually means the product is in stock.

{ 6 comments… read them below or add one }

corbin wolken December 2, 2011 at 12:59 pm

I have a rutherford B. Hayes coin and I did not buy the pack. I just got change back from a store with this coin.

Ann Reynolds January 28, 2012 at 11:48 am

What is the metal content of the Coin? I failed to find that information in the
description pages.

CoinNews.net January 28, 2012 at 11:59 am

Presidential $1’s are composed of manganese-brass, which consists of 88.5% Cu, 6% Zn, 3.5% Mn and 2% Ni. The total weight comes to 8.1 grams.

hec May 16, 2012 at 4:26 pm

I got one at monopolies

shell May 21, 2012 at 10:48 am

we got one when my mother was cleaning out an empty house for her boss they said we could keep it

Terry October 9, 2013 at 2:31 pm

I have a Rutherford B. HAyes dollar coin and I noticed on the other side of the coin the Statue of Liberty is upside down as compared to the front side, is this normal?

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