April Gold Eagle Bullion Coin Sales Surge

by Mike Unser on May 10, 2011 · 0 comments

United States Mint sales of American Gold Eagle bullion coins surged in April 2011, surpassing the previous month’s levels, those from the same period of a year ago and ranking as one of the best April’s in history.

2011 American Gold Eagle Bullion Coin

American Gold Eagle Bullion Coin

United States Mint Authorized Purchasers picked up 108,000 ounces of 22-karat bullion coins in April, handily topping the 73,500 sold in March 2011 by 34,500, or 46.9 percent, and the 60,500 sold in April 2010 by 47,500, or 78.5 percent.

American Gold Eagle bullion coin sales were led by the largest one ounce size ($50) followed by the one half ounce ($25). The smaller quarter ounce ($10) and tenth ounce ($5) coins registered their weakest monthly sales since January. January remains the best overall month this year as sales were supported by the release of the first 2011-dated issue.

2011 Gold Eagle Bullion Sales

(in ounces / number of coins)
Month One
( oz. / # )
Half
( oz. / # )
Quarter
( oz. / # )
Tenth
( oz. / # )
Total
( oz. / # )
January 130,500
130,500
500
1,000
500
2,000
2,000
20,000
133,500
153,500
February 72,500
72,500
6,000
12,000
4,000
16,000
10,000
100,000
92,500
200,500
March 60,500
60,500
4,000
8,000
5,000
20,000
4,000
40,000
73,500
128,500
April 94,500
94,500
6,000
12,000
3,500
14,000
4,000
40,000
108,000
160,500
YTD 358,000
358,000
16,500
33,000
13,000
52,000
20,000
200,000
92,500
200,500

 

The United States Mint introduced the Gold Eagle bullion coin in October 1986. Historically, April tends to be one the weaker sales months for gold bullion, although it generally outperforms summer months. Last month ranks as the fourth best April of all time.

Top 5 April Gold Eagle Sales

Year March Rank Sales Total
1999 1 161,000
1987 2 149,500
2009 3 147,500
2011 4 108,500
1998 5 71,000

 

American Gold Eagle bullion coins are different than the numismatic or collector counterparts. All Gold Eagles are composed of .9167 fine gold and share the same obverse and reverse designs. An easy means of telling the coins apart is searching for a mint mark. The collector proof and uncirculated versions bear a West Point "W" mint mark on their obverse. The bullion Gold Eagle has no mint mark.

This site’s bullion coins section offers information on US and World bullion offerings from government mints.

{ 0 comments… add one now }

Leave a Comment