NGC Certifies Unpublished 1892-CC $10 Gold Eagle Triple Die Variety

by NGC on February 7, 2011 · 3 comments

Numismatic Guaranty Corporation (NGC) has announced that they have certified a significant Carson City Variety.

Close Up of 1892 Carson City $10 Gold Eagle Variety

A close-up of an 1892-CC $10 gold eagle which has a previously unpublished tripled die variety. The reverse of the gold eagle shows a tripling on the motto ‘In God We Trust’.

A coin submitted to NCS for conservation followed by NGC grading has turned out to be an unpublished variety.

This gold eagle coined at the Carson City Mint in 1892 bears a distinctly tripled reverse die, which is quite visible within the motto IN GOD WE TRUST.

1892-CC $10 gold eagle

NGC’s label for the 1892-CC $10 gold eagle uses ‘TDR’ to denote triple die variety. The VP-001 designation indicates the variety has not already been assigned a variety number in reference books and it is the first of its kind reported.

With a mintage of only 40,000 pieces this issue is scarce and popular with collectors, and it would have been coined from a very limited number of dies. It’s therefore surprising that this variety hasn’t been reported previously. NCS President David Camire spotted it while performing conservation work.

NGC has graded the coin MS-61+ and labeled it VP-001. The VarietyPlus® numbering system is used by NGC for varieties not already assigned variety numbers in popular reference books, and this is the first variety reported for 1892-CC eagles.

While the coin was not submitted for variety attribution, NGC believed this discovery too important to let it slip through without noting the variety. Collectors are urged to examine their 1892-CC tens for other examples.

About NGC

NGC was founded in 1987, and for coin grading, its opening heralded the introduction of a new standard of integrity. From the beginning NGC focused on only one objective, a standard of consistent and accurate grading.

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{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

Koichi Ito February 8, 2011 at 3:43 am

It is just like 1873 and 1873S Double Eagle Gold $20 Coins. So why include 1892CC $10 Gold Eagle as well? Since both 1873 and 1873S has “Open and Closed Date” Types.

James February 8, 2011 at 5:07 am

I’m not a dealer, but I have started collecting some coins. I know hardly anything about coins except that I’ve gotten addicted. About a year ago, I decided to Join NGC, because they offered the 1st Five coins graded for free. I remember sending in all older commemorative coins. One came back saying to Call- NCS along with a phone # for conservation something. I called them and they said to send it in, but I never did. That was about a year ago. I let my NGC expire after that. I probably need to look for that coin. Thinking back, I believe it had like a sort of column on the back. I thought the shipping was bad enough, just to have to pay, and I’m pretty much set on a budget. Could be worth something…. Who Knows…..

Marilyn R. Pickaree February 9, 2011 at 5:56 am

I believe that I have a unknown variety involving the 2009 D Zachery Taylor Gold Dollar in which on the reverse Lady Liberty show a DDR on the index finger. I dubbed the coin a “Finger/Ring Bling” error as it looks like she is sportin’ a ring on her index finger. Anyone that has encountered this error please email me at I look foward to any and all responses from the numisatic world ad the coin was featured on Ebay. I am a member with PCGS.

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