State Quarter Mintages – Coin Production Numbers & Figures

by CoinNews.net on September 17, 2007 · 3 comments

Flashing back to the introduction of the 50 State Quarters® Program and you’re hit over the head with how fast time really does fly by.

The year was 1999 – the initiation year of an innovative, 10-year coin series where each state would be celebrated with a design commemorating its history and inclusion into the Union.

Since, we’ve experienced five new state quarters every year. And each quarter has a different reverse (tails) image and theme.

The quarters have not only helped highlight states’ history but have driven many Americans toward a new hobby, collecting coins.

And with that, new coins have been introduced and are continually planned in an attempt to keep that percolated numismatic interest high.

New coin collectors, investment prospectors and the like have, for sure, enjoyed a hot coin market that’s partly due to the success of the 50 State Quarter Program.

Yet, it looks clear that many a public interest in new coins is fickle, with a somewhat short interest span.

If anything highlights that, it’s the actual state quarter mintage numbers.

State Quarter Mintage Trends

The ramp-up and quarter-dollar trend is striking. With few exceptions, the state quarter production numbers started tilting higher toward the end of their first release year.

They escalated to their highest mintage numbers in year two and then started tapering off in 2001, trending downward for several years.

Interestingly, the quarter production figures slightly picked up in 2005, but not by much and have now steadied. One thing is certain…

The new state quarter series enjoyed it’s strongest peak during the first two years of launch.

U.S. State Quarter Production Figures Since 1999

With over 31 billion state commemorative quarters produced so far, the series ranks almost infinitely away from a "rare" classification. Even those state quarters with lower mintage numbers enjoy several hundred million exposures to public pockets.

U.S. Quarter Production Totals by State and by Mint Facility
(Circulation Figures Only)

1999 – U.S. Mint Quarter Production
State
Denver  
Philadelphia  
Total
401,424,000 
373,400,000 
774,824,000 
358,332,000 
349,000,000 
707,332,000 
299,028,000 
363,200,000 
662,228,000 
488,744,000 
451,188,000 
939,932,000 
657,880,000 
688,744,000 
1,346,624,000 
2000 –  U.S. Mint Quarter Production
State
Denver  
Philadelphia  
Total
535,184,000 
628,600,000 
1,163,784,000 
556,532,000 
678,200,000 
1,234,732,000 
566,208,000 
742,576,000 
1,308,784,000 
495,976,000 
673,040,000 
1,169,016,000 
651,616,000 
943,000,000 
1,594,616,000 
2001 –  U.S. Mint Quarter Production
State
Denver  
Philadelphia  
Total
619,640,000 
655,400,000 
1,275,040,000 
427,876,000 
627,600,000 
1,055,476,000 
447,100,000 
423,000,000 
870,100,000 
459,404,000 
423,400,000 
882,804,000 
370,564,000 
353,000,000 
723,564,000 
2002 – U.S. Mint Quarter Production
State
Denver  
Philadelphia  
Total
286,468,000 
361,600,000 
648,068,000 
414,832,000 
217,200,000 
632,032,000 
402,204,000 
362,000,000 
764,204,000 
327,200,000 
362,600,000 
689,800,000 
289,600,000 
290,000,000 
579,600,000 
2003 – U.S. Mint Quarter Production
State
Denver  
Philadelphia  
Total
237,400,000 
225,800,000 
463,200,000 
232,400,000 
225,000,000 
457,400,000 
231,400,000 
217,400,000 
448,800,000 
228,200,000 
225,000,000 
453,200,000 
229,800,000 
228,000,000 
457,800,000 
2004 – U.S. Mint Quarter Production
State
Denver  
Philadelphia  
Total
225,800,000 
233,800,000 
459,600,000 
241,600,000 
240,200,000 
481,800,000 
263,000,000 
278,800,000 
541,800,000 
251,400,000 
213,800,000 
465,200,000 
226,800,000 
226,400,000 
453,200,000 
2005 – U.S. Mint Quarter Production
State
Denver  
Philadelphia  
Total
263,200,000 
257,200,000 
520,400,000 
248,400,000 
239,600,000 
488,000,000 
404,000,000 
316,200,000 
720,200,000 
300,000,000 
263,400,000 
563,400,000 
356,200,000 
365,400,000 
721,600,000 
2006 – U.S. Mint Quarter Production
State
Denver  
Philadelphia  
Total
312,800,000 
277,000,000 
589,800,000 
273,000,000 
318,000,000 
591,000,000 
294,200,000 
274,800,000 
569,000,000 
359,000,000 
305,800,000 
664,800,000 
265,800,000 
245,000,000 
510,800,000 
2007 – U.S. Mint Quarter Production
State
Denver  
Philadelphia  
Total 
256,240,000 
257,000,000 
513,240,000 
280,000,000 
265,200,000 
545,200,000 
286,800,000 
294,600,000 
581,400,000 
320,800,000
243,600,000
564,400,000
n/a
n/a
n/a

Given these numbers, it’s hard for some collectors to really want to chomp on collecting any of the general circulated state quarters. Although each is unique in design, there are just so many of them…

That can explain some of the short interest span mentioned earlier. And with less interest and demand, it’s clearer why the quarter mintage numbers scale down.

Will interest peak to another high in 2008, as collectors realize the series is concluding and they can finally finish their sets? You’d exect so, but we’ll have to wait and see.

Mintage numbers are lower for the state quarters but coin interest is up

As new collectors are brought into the numismatic hobby by the quarters, many learn, gain experience and spend a ton of money on coins. Through the years they’ve gravitated toward collecting other really unique coins.

That results in some frustrations for coin dealers. For them, it’s been difficult keeping up with having the higher quality coins in stock that newer collectors generally desire. But, that’s better than a slow coin market…

The 50 State Quarters Program has resulted in innovation in other areas that have been great for the hobby as well.

New coin designs and concepts, fresh packaging ideas, different promotional and marketing thrusts, increased competition and a drastically improved online coin community are just some of the improvements seen.

However, with that has come a fair share of "profit seekers" who sell overpriced coins, misinformation and use illegitimate methods that hurt the profession.

There’s good and bad with anything.

In all this… it’d be interesting to see how many who started into the hobby with the state quarters still collect them.

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Adam Nash September 17, 2007 at 8:27 pm

Hi,

I think you’ve made a mistake here. The mintage of the US State Quarters has absolutely nothing to do with the demand for the coins. Because the US Treasury controls the mintage of circulating coins, the quantity of all cash instruments (from pennies to bills) is determined by the overall money supply needs of the economy.

So, when the government wants a tight money supply, they mint fewer quarters, and when they want to add money, they mint more.

That’s why the mintage spikes after the stock market crash – the government wanted to add liquidity and increased all cash instruments.

Actually, I wrote a blog post about how this might be a collecting opportunity. Because the mintage is controlled by the economy, it doesn’t really match to the demand for each state. If you assume that there is more demand for states with higher populations (since more potential collectors live there), it might make sense to buy up the quarters from big states with low mintages.

Check out my blog post (and eBay guide) on the topic. It’s the number 1 guide for state quarters on eBay now.

Adam

Paul Dappen July 3, 2013 at 5:45 pm

Hey Out there:
Can anyone tell me how many commentative (S Mint) Quarters were made by the San Fransico Mint?
Thank You, Paul

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