2018 WWI Centennial Silver Dollars Minted in Ceremonial Event

by CoinNews.net on December 1, 2017 · 15 comments

On Thursday, Nov. 28, officials from the United States Mint hosted a ceremonial strike event for the 2018 World War I Centennial Silver Dollar commemorating the 100th anniversary of America’s involvement in the First World War.

2018-P Proof World War I Centennial Silver Dollar - Obverse

A newly-minted World War I Centennial Silver Dollar. The coin will be released on Jan 17, 2018. U.S. Mint photo by Sharon McPike.

Guests at the ceremony included three sponsors of the legislation authorizing the commemorative coin, the dollar’s designer and sculptor, the chair of the WWI Centennial Commission, and the grandson of a famous World War I hero.

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United States Mint sculptor-engraver Renata Gordon sings the National Anthem during the World War I Centennial Silver Dollar strike ceremony. U.S. Mint photo by Sharon McPike.


Gerald York

Gerald York, grandson of WWI hero SGT Alvin York, holds the World War I Centennial Silver Dollar he struck at the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia. U.S. Mint photo by Sharon McPike.


Kenneth Holland - Congressman Doug Lamborn

U.S. Mint Coin Press Operator Kenneth Holland hands Congressman Doug Lamborn (R-Colorado) the World War I Centennial Silver Dollar he struck at the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia on Nov 28, 2017. U.S. Mint photo by Sharon McPike.


Kenneth Holland stands - Congressman Emanuel Cleaver II

U.S. Mint Coin Press Operator Kenneth Holland stands with Congressman Emanuel Cleaver, II (D-Missouri) holding the World War I Centennial Silver Dollar he struck at the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia. U.S. Mint photo by Sharon McPike.


Senator Roy Blunt

Senator Roy Blunt (R-Missouri) holds the World War I Centennial Silver Dollar he struck at the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia. U.S. Mint photo by Sharon McPike.


Terry Hamby

U.S. World War I Centennial Commission Chair Terry Hamby holds the World War I Centennial Silver Dollar he struck at the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia. U.S. Mint photo by Sharon McPike.


Dennis O’Connor

U.S. Mint Police Chief Dennis O’Connor holds the World War I Centennial Silver Dollar he struck at the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia. U.S. Mint photo by Sharon McPike.


2018 WWI Centennial Silver Dollar Ceremony Strike Event

Gerald York, grandson of WWI hero SGT Alvin York, holds a newly-minted 2018 World War I Centennial Silver Dollar. He is joined by (l to r) Daniel Basta, U.S. Foundation for the Commemoration of the World Wars, U.S. Mint Coin Press Operator Kenneth Holland, Congressman Emanuel Cleaver, II (D-Missouri), U.S. Mint Police Chief Dennis O’Connor, Congressman Doug Lamborn (R-Colorado), U.S. WWI Centennial Commission Chair Terry Hamby and Senator Roy Blunt (R-Missouri). The commemorative coin will be released on Jan 17, 2018. U.S. Mint photo by Sharon McPike.

LeRoy Transfield created the silver dollar’s designs and recently retired United States Mint Sculptor-Engraver Don Everhart sculpted them for coins. They were selected by the Treasury Secretary based on winning designs from a juried competition.

Transfield’s obverse or heads side design, titled “Soldier’s Charge,” depicts an almost stone-like soldier gripping a rifle. Barbed wire twines appear in the lower right-hand side. Inscriptions are LIBERTY, 1918, 2018, and IN GOD WE TRUST. Poppies have been used since 1921 to commemorate soldiers who have died in war.

2018 World War I Centennial Silver Dollar Die

A World War I Centennial Silver Dollar die is displayed following the ceremonial striking at the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia on Nov 28, 2017. U.S. Mint photo by Brian Martin.


2018 World War I Centennial Silver Dollar Under Magnification

A newly-minted World War I Centennial Silver Dollar through a magnifying lens following the ceremonial striking at the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia on Nov 28, 2017. U.S. Mint photo by Brian Martin.

The barbed wire design continues onto the coin’s reverse, which is titled "Poppies in the Wire." It shows abstract poppies mixed in with the wire. Inscriptions include ONE DOLLAR, E PLURIBUS UNUM, and UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

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LeRoy Transfield, winning artist who designed the World War I Centennial Silver Dollar, holds a newly-minted coin following the ceremonial striking at the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia on Nov 28, 2017. U.S. Mint photo by Sharon McPike.


2018-P Proof World War I Centennial Silver Dollar - Reverse

A closer view from the above photo of the coin’s reverse

The U.S. Mint will begin selling a pair of WWI Centennial Silver Dollars on Jan. 17, 2018. Available qualities will include the collector finishes of proof and uncirculated. Their prices have yet to be announced.

Surcharges of $10 will be collected on each one sold with proceeds, after associated costs, paid to the United States Foundation for the Commemoration of the World Wars to assist the World War I Centennial Commission in memorializing the centenary of the war.

The U.S. Mint in 2018 will also produce and sell companion WWI silver medals honoring the Army, Navy, Air Service, Marines, and Coast Guard.. (See these medal designs.) Each medal will be paired with a World War I Centennial Silver Dollar and offered as a special set.

{ 15 comments… read them below or add one }

Charlie 1952 December 1, 2017 at 11:51 pm

Wouldn’t it be nice if the mint would slip a silver eagle from Denver in the silver reverse proof set next year?

Andrew December 2, 2017 at 9:22 am

“The U.S. Mint in 2018 will also produce and sell companion WWI silver medals honoring the Army, Navy, Air Service, Marines, and Coast Guard… Each medal will be paired with a World War I Centennial Silver Dollar and offered as a special set.” Perhaps the Mint will get the bright marketing idea to sell a COMPLETE set of all 5 medals and 1 silver dollar. However, I understand that selling 1 medal with 1 dollar is probably a better money maker. Oh well ~ (sigh) 🙁

Joe Brown December 2, 2017 at 3:14 pm

One certain Senator look,s like he smoked a big fat ””Blunt””” in the back seat of his limo, before he got into the *Philly mint, or is that what happens when you fake ”’smile”’ to much, just like Batman*s arch enemy the guy with the ”green” hair.

Seth Riesling December 2, 2017 at 6:03 pm

Joe Brown –

LOL. He looks like a televangelist asking for money to save your soul !
I hope they checked his pockets before he left the Mint! What a clown face. It takes practice to fake smile like that & get away with it.

-NumisdudeTX

Joe Brown December 2, 2017 at 7:04 pm

Seth – i* don’t think he can wipe that sh”t eating smile off his face. Good one*Seth, LOL, he looks like he sold his soul to the >princequeen<, sorry i* just can't help myself sometimes, she's been badgering me on this computer or where ever for decades, i* gotta grow up. lol*

Tinto December 3, 2017 at 11:54 am

At least they removed the third eye from the “soldier” (from what i see in the pic anyway.. and that’s the closest I want to get to this PO* … ) … what a dishonor to those who served in WWI ..IMO …

Chas Barber December 4, 2017 at 5:34 pm

LeRoy used himself as a model it appears, a real fuguly coin……somany nice medal renditions & we get this? YOUR mint @ work………….. Blout is smiling as he made his ma$ters happy w/the marvelous tax increase, oops cut package for Apple, BofA, etc. They KEEP SALT deductions, we don’t we are only people you know, when is the Trump Plutocracy Coin?

jim December 6, 2017 at 1:14 pm

I would much rather see an end of war commemorative $1 than a start of war coin

Tinto December 6, 2017 at 1:52 pm

@Chas Barber

Yeah, now that you mention it. it looks like the so called artist/designer LeRoy maybe he did a self portrait. probably took a selfie and worked from there. I am astounded that this self promotion got past the 3 CCAC political appointees who judged the contest, along with others …. and to rub salt in the wound of those wishing to get the medals instead of this POS “coin” are forced to buy a coin for each medal!! The Mint obviously is aware they got a coin that s*cks big time and need to goose up the sales by forcing folks to buy one for each medal purchased. Good o’l monopoly power at work ..

Tinto December 6, 2017 at 2:47 pm

And the Mint posted a photo of the “artist” posing with the reverse of the coin … thereby making a direct comparison between his and the “soldier’s” likeness a little harder. One (like myself) would have just looked at the photo and moved on .. but I think the Mint might see the similarity too and did not publish that shot .. sad!

Chas Barber December 6, 2017 at 4:39 pm

Tinto, I think so, or he used a bad shot of Curly Howard. The mint’s last few subject for commems [Congress’ call) & the designs were/are quite weak. As I said the medal have some fantastic designs, this coin is awful? Why not Sgt. York or Blackjack Pershing or something else real, we got Father FLannigan for boys town, thi artist with a crooked nose on the WW1 coin. @ $50 a coin for <1oz of silver come on…..and by the way what happened to the .999 coins auithorized a couple of years ago, we still have .9oo's…….even a special .999 proof COIN might sell well, they gotta do something…maybe release some silver coin$ into circulation to make people L00K…..hmmmmm

Paul Price December 8, 2017 at 1:29 pm

I can’t believe they actually minted this coin. Terrible obverse design doesn’t even look like a Doughboy. Everything is wrong, what an embarrassment for the Mint to issue such a mess, The helmet, the uniform. the eyes, the nose, the left handed soldier holding the right handed Springfield rifle incorrectly. Looks like he is running away and not charging. A complete mess / a failure of a design. Who is running the US Mint, someone who does not know anything about WWI and what a Doughboy’s uniform and helmet looks like. Another massive embarrassment for the US Mint. What an awful looking obverse, please no more ugly incorrect designs.

jim December 9, 2017 at 12:15 pm

Paul Price
Good review of the design. Isn’t the CCAC supposed to review and decide on recommendations for coin designs? Maybe they didn’t for this one or nobody cared enough to research themselves or knew enough to point out those glaring errors. Reviewing the designs of a commemorative coin law enacted by Congress should be required for at least the authors of the bill as well. But then again they’re probably so intent on blocking their political counterparts’ activities and raising money for their next election they can’t be bothered.

Tinto December 10, 2017 at 1:36 am

@jim

I read somewhere that the CCAC only sent 3 reps to the Mint’s juried design competition and all three were political appointees!! So apparently CCAC was not given the designs to comment upon and recommend. This coin is so bad the Mint has to pair it with the medals (which look way way better) in order to goose what will probably be pitiful sales.

Seth Riesling December 10, 2017 at 9:38 am

jim & Tinto & Paul Price –

You all make some very good & interesting critiques of this horrible obverse coin design (i actually like the reverse design though). President Theodore Roosevelt said that the coin designs of U.S. Mint Chief Engraver Charles Barber (the Barber dime, quarter & half dollar) were “atrociously hideous”! I think he may have had a lot to say about this atrocious obverse design selected by a nationwide juried competition. Is this really the best design that was submitted by the top artists in the USA!?
I will not purchase this commemorative $1 coin or the five coin & medal sets from the Mint. I will wait for dealers to get the five different U.S. Armed Forces silver medals in stock & purchase them raw or graded depending on the secondary market price from my favorite “modern” U.S. coin & medal dealers. I like the idea & designs of the 5 silver medals & they will make a nice set, even though the Mint will not be getting my money on this program since they refuse to sell the silver medals separately.

Happy collecting everyone!

-NumisdudeTX

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