2017 Boys Town Coin Designs Unveiled

by CoinNews.net on August 24, 2016 · 6 comments

Designs for coins celebrating the 100th anniversary of Boys Town were unveiled Tuesday during a ceremony in Boys Town Music Hall, Nebraska.

Designs for 2017 Boys Town Centennial Commemorative Coins - Gold, Silver and Clad

Designs for the $5 gold, silver dollar, and 50c clad half-dollar 2017 Boys Town Centennial Commemorative Coins

The United States Mint will sell the commemorative coins next year in compositions of gold, silver and clad with options that include coin qualities of proof and uncirculated.

Rhett Jeppson, deputy director of the U.S. Mint, joined Boys Town officials and other dignitaries for the ceremonial unveiling.

"Each time a person looks at any one of these unique designs, it will spark an interest in learning about the history of Boys Town, acknowledging the extraordinary efforts made by this organization to give comfort and purpose to children in need, and recognizing the significant contributions of Father Flanagan," Jeppson said.

Founded on Dec. 12, 1917 by Father Edward Flanagan, Boys Town (www.boystown.org) serves underprivileged and at-risk children. The nonprofit helps more than 2 million children and families each year.

"This is such an exciting time at Boys Town as we release the designs of these symbolic coins," Father Steven Boes, Boys Town National Executive Director, said in a statement. "These coins will help us commemorate and celebrate the outstanding work that has been done by our organization over the last 100 years."

The coin designs are emblematic of the childcare organization and its mission. There are six in total, with an obverse and reverse design for each of the three metallic versions.

Gold coin obverses offer a portrait of Father Edward Flanagan. Their reverse shows a young oak tree growing from an acorn, which stands for the potential in each child helped by Boys Town to grow into a productive citizen.

Designs for 2017 $5 Boys Town Centennial Commemorative Gold Coin

Obverse and reverse designs for the $5 gold coin. The obverse was designed by United States Mint Artistic Infusion Program (AIP) Designer Donna Weaver and sculpted by Mint Sculptor-Engraver Don Everhart. The reverse was also designed by Weaver and sculpted by Mint Sculptor-Engraver Jim Licaretz.

Silver coin obverses depict a girl sitting alone and gazing upward into the branches of an oak tree looking for help. The coin’s reverse depicts an oak tree offering shelter and a sense of belonging to the family holding hands below it.

Designs for 2017 Boys Town Centennial Commemorative Silver Dollar

Obverse and reverse designs for the silver dollar. The obverse was designed by AIP Designer Emily Damstra and sculpted by Mint Sculptor-Engraver Joseph Menna. The reverse was also designed by Damstra and sculpted by Menna.

Clad half-dollar obverses feature an older brother holding the hand of his younger brother and walking towards Father Flanagan’s home in 1917. Their reverse depicts a present-day Boys Town neighborhood of homes where children are educated and nurtured by caring families.

Designs for 2017 Boys Town Centennial Commemorative Clad Half-Dollar

Obverse and reverse designs for the clad half-dollar. The obverse was designed by AIP Designer Chris Costello and sculpted by Mint Sculptor-Engraver Renata Gordon. The reverse was also designed by Costello and sculpted by Mint Sculptor-Engraver Phebe Hemphill.

Congress authorized the collectibles with the Boys Town Centennial Commemorative Coin Act (Public Law 114-30), which was enacted in July 2015. The law calls for up to 50,000 $5 gold coins, no more than 350,000 silver dollars, and a maximum of 300,000 clad half-dollars. Their prices will include surcharges paid to Boys Town to help carry out its mission.

The U.S. Mint will announce prices, a release date and additional information for the commemorative coins before their release in 2017.

{ 6 comments… read them below or add one }

Jp August 24, 2016 at 8:37 pm

All in all I think these are very nice looking coins. I had my doubts about how these would look, but I think these will go over extremely well.
I would say well done.

Bustywidow August 25, 2016 at 8:44 am

Yawn, no thanks…

Dave August 25, 2016 at 9:37 am

Yeah, these don’t capture my attention at all…

Jp August 25, 2016 at 10:00 am

All right all right…you cant please everyone but they could have been worse.

vadim August 25, 2016 at 1:28 pm

It was a good cause! I wasn’t aware until I read about it.

I guess it’s about making coins look good with low mintage.

Whistler August 29, 2016 at 2:58 pm

Yawn. DOn;t they already get contributions of 1oo’s of million$ a year? Funny very few “boys”: depicted on this coin, more like an ad for PCness…..

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