Sedwick’s November Treasure Sale Includes Ingot and Coin Rarities

by CoinNews.net on October 3, 2019 · 2 comments

A large variety of gold and silver shipwreck bars as well as numismatic rarities will attract excited bidding during Daniel Frank Sedwick, LLC’s Treasure, World, U.S Coin & Paper Money Auction 26. The floor auction will be held on Nov. 1-2, 2019 at the DoubleTree Disney Springs in Orlando, FL and live online.

gold cob 8 escudos dated 1714

A gold cob 8 escudos dated 1714 with assayer’s initial J was previously used as a showpiece for the Real Eight Company’s finds and pictured in a 1965 National Geographic article.

Ingots from famous wrecks like the "Tumbaga wreck" of ca. 1528 will be found in the sale. The Atocha, sunk in 1622 off Key West, Florida, will be represented by three gold "finger" bars, one of which is a long specimen weighing 1,325 grams and estimated at $50,000 and up that last appeared in the 1987 Caesars Palace auction of Atocha artifacts.

Gold finger bar recovered from the Atocha

This gold “finger” bar recovered from the Atocha was used as a means of transporting great wealth and bears several tax stamps indicating that King Philip IV’s share had been paid.

A further seven large silver ingots from the Atocha will also be sold, several of which have the same Caesar’s Palace pedigree.

Shipwreck coins will also appear in the auction, many of which were held in collections for many years. The John Pullin collection of dated Mexican cobs is comprised of choice gold escudos and silver reales, most of which are pedigreed to the 1715 Plate Fleet, sunk off the east coast of Florida.

The group includes an important gold 8 escudos dated 1714 and graded NGC MS 60 that was salvaged by the Real Eight Company and photographed in a 1965 National Geographic article that made the Fleet’s coins famous. A similar assembly of coins, the Atocha Classics collection, will feature top-quality silver cobs from that popular wreck.

Likewise, another two collections focusing on South American medals will cross the block. The Whittier collection of Bolivian Monetary Medals boasts high grade examples of circulating gold and silver commemoratives from the 1800s, all graded by PCGS.

Falkland Islands pound note dated 1915

This Falkland Islands pound note dated 1915 was among the first paper money issued by the British administration; very few are known to have survived today.

Following that, the Santander collection is composed of rare Colombian proclamation medals and includes a very rare "Gibraltar de America" trial strike (lot 1133) with a pedigree going back to Glendining’s Peltzer sale in 1927.

The highest estimated coin in the sale is lot 942, a Honduras gold 20 pesos dated 1888 and graded NGC AU 58. Based on mint records and opinions from numismatists Henry Christensen and Holland Wallace, probably fewer than 30 examples were struck; only three are known to survive today. It is estimated at $40,000 and up.

Other top lots in the sale include:

  • Lot 2: Mexico City, Mexico, cob 8 escudos, 1714J, "GRAT" variety (date on reverse), NGC MS 63, ex-1715 Fleet (designated on special label), ex-Real Eight, ex-John Pullin (stated on label). Estimate: $15,000 and up.

  • Lot 4: Mexico City, Mexico, cob 8 escudos, 1715J, NGC MS 63, ex-1715 Fleet (designated on special label), ex-John Pullin (stated on label). Estimate: $12,500 to $20,000.

  • Lot 28: Lima, Peru, cob 8 escudos, 1708H, NGC MS 63, ex-1715 Fleet (designated on label). Estimate: $15,000 and up.

  • Lot 32: Lima, Peru, cob 8 escudos, 1715M, rare, NGC XF 45, ex-Loosdrecht (1719). Estimate: $10,000 to $15,000.

  • Lot 85: Small gold disk, 373 grams, 18K, marked with 48, small double-slash and A/V monogram, ex-Luz (1752), ex-Sotheby’s. Estimate: $17,500 and up.

  • Lot 295: USA (New Orleans Mint), gold $2-1/2 Classic Head, 1839-O, NGC AU 55 / SS New York (1846), housed in promotional "book." Estimate: $5,000 to $7,500.

  • Lot 298: USA (San Francisco Mint), gold $20 coronet Liberty "double eagle," 1865-S, PCGS AU58 / Brother Jonathan (1865). Estimate: $8,000 to $12,000.

  • Lot 407: Mexico City, Mexico, cob 8 reales Royal (galano), 1715J, NGC XF details. Estimate: $15,000 and up.

  • Lot 591: Argentina (River Plate Provinces), Potosi mint, 8 reales, 1813J, NGC MS 63+. Estimate: $2,500 to $3,750.

  • Lot 1078: Lima, Peru, gold 8 escudos, 1841MB, extremely rare, NGC XF 45, Calico La Onza Plate Coin. Estimate: $10,000 and up.

  • Lot 1097: Toledo, Spain, gold double excelente, Ferdinand-Isabel, T to left and cross of five dots flanking shield on reverse, NGC MS 63*, finest and only example in NGC census. Estimate: $7,000 to $10,000.

  • Lot 1292: Bogota, Colombia, Banco Prendario, 1 peso, 1881, series A, serial 00855, PMG Choice UNC 64 EPQ. Estimate: $2,500 to $3,750.

  • Lot 1312: Falkland Islands, Government of the Falkland Islands, 1 pound, 3-3-1915, serial B05682, PMG Fine 12, rare. Estimate $4,000 and up.

  • Lot 1317: Athens, Greece, Bank of Greece, 25 drachmai specimen, no date (1897-1900), PMG VF 30, rare, only known example in PMG census. Estimate: $2,500 and up.

Bidders can register now for the auction at www.auction.sedwickcoins.com; the catalog will be available online beginning Oct. 8. For more details, please contact Daniel Frank Sedwick, LLC at office@sedwickcoins.com.

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Gary G
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Gary G

“The Atocha, sunk in 1622 off Key West, Florida, will be represented by three gold “finger” bars, one of which is a long specimen weighing 1,325 grams and estimated at $50,000 and up that last appeared in the 1987 Caesars Palace auction of Atocha artifacts.”

1,325 grams is about 42.6 troy ounces. Wouldn’t $50,000 be at a discount to the price of gold?

RonnieBGood
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RonnieBGood

Current prices are for 99.99% pure Au.
I suspect that this was not attainable in 1622.