2014 Warren G. Harding Presidential $1 Coins in Rolls, Bags and Boxes

by Adam Wegener on February 6, 2014 · 0 comments

At noon ET today, Feb 6, the United States Mint released the first circulating-quality 2014 Presidential $1 Coins in numismatic rolls, bags and boxes. The dollars honor and depict Warren G. Harding who served from 1921 to 1923 as the 29th President of the United States.

2014 Warren G. Harding Presidential $1 Coins in Rolls, Bags and Boxes

2014 P&D Warren G. Harding Presidential $1 Coins in U.S. Mint rolls, bags and boxes. The dollars are in circulating-quality.

This release marks the 29th from the U.S. Mint’s series of Presidential $1 Coins with three more scheduled for this year. Upcoming 2014 Presidential dollars will honor former Presidents Calvin Coolidge, Herbert Hoover and Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Read about and see line art images of all 2014 $1 designs.

Designs & Specifications of Warren G. Harding Presidential Dollars

Obverses (heads side) of the new $1 coins feature a likeness of Warren G. Harding. Inscriptions on this side of the coin read: "Warren G. Harding," "In God We Trust," "29th President" and "1921-1923" for his years of service.

2014 Warren G. Harding Presidential $1 Coin

Shown here is the obverse of a circulating-quality 2014 Warren G. Harding Presidential $1 Coin, the same coin offered in U.S. Mint rolls, bags and boxes

Reverses (tails side) of all Presidential $1 Coins show Don Everhart’s rendition of the Statue of Liberty with surrounding inscriptions reading "United States of America" and "$1."

Reverse Side of Presidential $1 Coins

A depiction of the Statue of Liberty is on the reverse of every Presidential dollar

On the edge of each coin are the incused inscriptions: "2013," "E PLURIBUS UNUM," and the mint mark of either "P" or "D." The letter designations tell where the coins were produced, either at the U.S. Mint facility in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania or at the U.S. Mint facility in Denver, Colorado. And unlike collector proof versions, the location of edge-incused inscriptions can vary with every circulating-quality coin.

Specifications of Presidential $1 Coins, and Native American $1 Coins for that matter, include a manganese-brass composition of 88.5% copper, 6% zinc, 3.5% manganese and 2% nickel. Dollar coins each weigh 8.1 grams, have a diameter of 26.49 mm, or 1.043 inches, and a thickness of 2.0 mm.

This U.S. Mint table shows specifications of all modern coins.

25-Coin Rolls Warren G. Harding Presidential $1s

2014 P and D Warren G. Harding Presidential $1 Coins in Rolls

2014 P&D Harding Presidential $1 Coins in rolls

2014 Warren G. Harding Presidential $1 Coins are available in 25-coin rolls for a price of $32.95. These rolls originate from either the Denver Mint or Philadelphia Mint.

Each roll has U.S. Mint-branded wrapping of white paper with black edges. Printed on the paper is:

United States Mint,
www.usmint.gov
Presidential $1 Coin
Warren G. Harding,
$25

There is also a "P" or "D" in large font to the right side that denotes the mint of origin. The rolls are wrapped by an automated machine process so there is no guarantee that there will be both a heads and tails side visible.

100-Coin Bags of Warren G. Harding Presidential $1s

2014 P and D Warren G. Harding Presidential $1 Coins in Bags

2014 P&D Harding Presidential $1 Coins in bags

Bags of 100 Warren G. Harding Presidential $1 Coins are listed at $111.95. These 100-coin bags are also available with dollars from either U.S. Mint plants in Denver or Philadelphia.

The bags are made of canvas and bear bold letters reading "U.S. MINT," "DOLLARS" and "$100.00."

Tags are sewn onto the upper left corner of each that state: "2014," "Presidential $1 Coin," "Warren G. Harding," "United States Mint" and either "P" or "D" for the city of origin. The U.S. Mint logo is also on the tag.

250-Coin Boxes of Warren G. Harding Presidential $1s

2014 P and D Warren G. Harding Presidential $1 Coins in Boxes

2014 P&D Harding Presidential $1 Coins in boxes

Large boxes are also sold that hold 250 coins. These 250-coin boxes are available from either the Denver or Philadelphia Mints for a price of $275.95.

The boxes have a sticker that says: "2014 Presidential $1 Coin," "Warren G. Harding," "$250," "United States Mint" and "www.usmint.gov" as well as "P" or "D" for the mint of origin.

500-coin boxes of $1s are no longer available because the Mint, citing declining collector interest, discontinued the product line late last year.

Ordering Warren G. Harding Presidential $1 Coins

Collectors may place orders for the rolls, bags and boxes straight from the U.S. Mint’s website at www.usmint.gov with its Presidential $1 Coin product page found here.

Telephone orders are accepted at 1-800-USA-MINT (872-6468). Also, hearing- and speech-impaired customers may place orders by calling 1-888-321-MINT (6468).

There are no ordering limits on any of the rolls, bags or boxes. Collector demand determines how many are produced since dollars are no longer made for circulation.

Brief Warren G. Harding Biography

Warren G Harding

Warren G Harding

Born to Dr. George Tryon Harding, Sr. and Phoebe Elizabeth (Dickerson) Harding in 1865, Warren G. Harding was eldest of eight children. At the age 10 he began working at The Argus, the local newspaper that was run by his father. It was during this time that he developed a love for journalism. Harding went on to attend Ohio Central College to study for the printing and newspaper trade.

In 1899, Harding was elected to the state senate for the 13 Senatorial District in Ohio. After two prior and unsuccessful attempts, he again announced his candidacy for Governor of Ohio for the 1909 but lost to the incumbent. Upon losing the gubernatorial race, he simply said:

"I have lost nothing which I ever had except a few dollars which I can make again, a few pounds of flesh which I can grow again, a few false friends of whom I am well rid, and an ambition which simply fettered my freedom and did not make for happiness."

Harding was elected into the U.S. Senate in 1915 and served there until he became the 29th President in 1921. One of the unique things he did early into his presidency was appoint former President William Howard Taft to the Supreme Court.

In mid-1923, he and several others from his administration set out to reconnect with the America people and went on a trip through the western United States. It was during this time that his health noticeably declined. On the night of August 2, 1923 while in San Francisco, President Harding died suddenly while in a conversation with his wife.

{ 0 comments… add one now }

Leave a Comment