Presidential Coins

Reverse of Presidential $1 CoinDespite an official confirmation from the United States Mint that is likely to be off into the distance, Federal Reserve Bank Services has published release dates for the upcoming 2012 Presidential $1 Coins, just as it recently listed them for the 2012 quarters. Of course, the standard caveat of "release dates are subject to change" applies, but it does give interested collectors at least a close idea of when the strikes from the sixth year of the Presidential series will be issued.

These four releases will mark the 21st through 24th of the series which honors former Presidents of the United States of America with portraits of the selected individuals showcased on the obverse of each strike. The program debuted in 2007 with a coin honoring George Washington, the first President of the United States […]

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Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Dollar Coin CoverThe United States Mint released the Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Dollar Coin Cover on Tuesday, October 4, for $19.95.

A popular collector product, the coin cover includes two circulation quality dollar coins chosen from the first day of production. One Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential $1 Coin is from the US Mint facility in Denver and the other is from Philadelphia. Both were struck on June 1, 2011. These coins are mounted on a display card with a U.S. 44-cent postage stamp […]

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Hayes Presidential $1 Coin & First Spouse Medal SetThe Hayes Presidential $1 Coin & First Spouse Medal Set was launched by the United States Mint on Thursday, September 22, for $14.95.

The set features two collector strikes, an uncirculated Rutherford B. Hayes $1 Coin and a Lucy Hayes bronze medal, which bears the same designs as her First Spouse Gold Coins. The two are mounted on a decorative card with the portraits of the President and First Lady […]

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Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential DollarThe United States Mint on Thursday, August 18, 2011, ceremoniously released the Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential $1 Coin and also began selling rolls of the dollars for $39.95 each, plus shipping and handling.

Each of the rolls contains 25 circulation quality coins, and buyers have a choice of rolls coming from the United States Mint facility in Philadelphia or Denver. The Mint’s wrapping paper is specially designed in black and white to feature the mint of origin ("P" or "D"), "Presidential $1 Coin," "Rutherford B. Hayes," and "$25," which is the face value of its contents […]

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Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Dollar

The U.S. Mint announced plans to host a public launch ceremony and coin exchange for the Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential $1 Coin on August 18, 2011. The dollar is the third of four 2011 Presidential $1 Coins.

The release ceremony will be held in the Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center at Spiegel Grove in Fremont, Ohio beginning at 10 AM (Eastern Time). The main entrance to the center can be found at the corner of Hayes and Buckland avenues […]

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dollars

The United States Mint has once again altered its circulating $1 Coin Direct Ship Program in response to continued "abuses" of the system. Effective as of July 22, 2011 the Mint no longer accepts credit and debit cards for any transactions relating to the Direct Ship Program.

Consumers prefer to use paper money over heavier coins in daily transactions, which has stunted $1 coin circulation. The United States Mint established the Direct Ship Program over three years ago as a method of seeding $1 coins into circulation. Using it, participants are able to order large quantities of […]

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Ulysses S. Grant Presidential DollarThe Presidential $1 Coin Program would not run its full course if several members of the Senate and House get their way. Two separate pieces of legislation have been introduced in the U.S. Congress which would ultimately end the dollar coins series dedicated to the former Presidents of the United States.

This new legislation comes in response to recent media attention to a reported $1 billion plus worth of dollar coins held in storage by Federal Reserve Banks. The massive stash of coins has been building up over the years with a marked increase occurring since the introduction of Presidential dollars four years ago.

Most attribute the inventory of dollar coins to two major factors. First, the public’s resistance to the use of dollar coins for everyday circulation. Second, requirements pertaining to […]

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Ulysses S. Grant Presidential $1 Coin & Julia Grant First Spouse Medal SetToday at noon Eastern Time, July 7, 2011, the United States Mint released the Ulysses S. Grant Presidential $1 Coin & Julia Grant First Spouse Medal Set for $14.95.

The set features collector versions of the uncirculated Ulysses S. Grant Presidential $1 Coin and Julia Grant’s bronze medal, which bears the same designs as her First Spouse Gold Coins. The coin and medal are mounted on the front of a durable plastic card next to portraits of the President and First Lady. The back of the card includes the Mint’s issuance information […]

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Ulysses S. Grant Presidential Dollar Coin CoverOn Wednesday, June 29, 2011, the United States Mint released the Ulysses S. Grant Presidential Coin Cover for $19.95.

The coin cover includes two circulation quality dollar coins mounted on a display card inside an envelope with a U.S. 44-cent Flag postage stamp. Each Ulysses S. Grant dollar is specially chosen from the first day of production. The US Mint facility in Denver produced one of the strikes on March 2, 2011, and Philadelphia’s US Mint facility struck the other on March 7, 2011 […]

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Ulysses S. Grant Presidential DollarThe United States Mint today at noon ET released $25 dollar rolls of Ulysses S. Grant Presidential $1 coins honoring the 18th President of the U.S. and a Civil War Hero.

The Mint and National Park Service officially introduced the Grant dollar during a coin launch ceremony held at the Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site in St. Louis, Missouri. A coin exchange followed the event, and $1 coins were released into the banking system for circulation […]

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