2020-W American Eagle Coins Carry ‘V75’ Privy Mark for End of WWII [Updated]

by Darrin Lee Unser on November 5, 2020 · 335 comments

Today, Nov. 5, the United States Mint will begin selling 2020-W Proof American Eagle Gold and Silver Coins celebrating the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II. Available at noon EST, both are issued in very limited mintages and both feature a symbolic "V75" privy mark.

End of World War II 75th Anniversary American Eagle Gold Proof Coin - reverse and obverse

U.S. Mint images of a proof American Eagle gold coin with a “V75” privy mark

The proof American Gold Eagle is restricted to just 1,945 units. The corresponding proof American Silver Eagle, meanwhile, is capped at a mintage of 75,000.

End of World War II 75th Anniversary American Eagle Silver Proof Coin - reverse and obverse

U.S. Mint images of a proof American Eagle silver coin with a “V75” privy mark

The coins carry the same obverse (heads side) and reverse (tails side) designs as their traditional counterparts. For the Gold Eagle, this includes Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ full-length figure of Liberty on the obverse and Miley Busiek’s depiction of a family of eagles on the reverse. On the Silver Eagle, we find Adolph A. Weinman’s "Walking Liberty" on the obverse and John Mercanti’s heraldic eagle with shield design on the reverse.

The V75 privy mark appears on coin obverses.

"The design outline of the privy mark represents the aerial view shape of the Rainbow Pool located at West Potomac Park in Washington, D.C., which is now an integral part of the World War II Memorial," the U.S. Mint describes.

Both coins were struck at the U.S. Mint’s facility in West Point.

Ordering and Prices

Upon their release, the 2020-W End of World War II 75th Anniversary American Eagle Coins may be ordered directly from the Mint’s online catalog for American Eagle products.

The proof Gold Eagle is $2,600 and the proof Silver Eagle is $83.00. In addition to their mintage limits, each has a household order limit of one coin.

The two coins launch a few days before another couple of related U.S. Mint products — a 2020 End of World War II 75th Anniversary 24-Karat Gold Coin and an associated 2020 End of World War II 75th Anniversary Silver Medal. These two products are scheduled to debut Nov. 9 and will feature nearly identical imagery.

Update (Nov. 5 at 12:30 pm EST): The U.S. Mint sent numismatic news editors the following message about ordering: "The United States Mint is aware of website issues impacting customers’ ability to purchase Mint products. We are working to correct the problem. Thank you for your patience."

Update 2 (Nov. 5 at 3:10 pm EST): The U.S. Mint sent numismatic news editors the following statement about sales of coins:

Statement Regarding Sales of End of World War II 75th Anniversary American Eagle Gold Proof Coin (20XE) & End of World War II 75th Anniversary American Eagle Silver Proof Coin (20XF).

"The 2020 End of WWII 75th Anniversary American Eagle One Ounce Gold Proof Coin and the End of World War II 75th Anniversary American Eagle Silver Proof Coin were released for sale at noon ET on November 5. Release of these coins resulted in the highest website traffic we have ever experienced, which greatly exceeded our expected capacity.  This high volume caused website instability, and customers encountered error messages and in some cases were unable to purchase their desired product.  Due to extremely high demand, the American Eagle Gold Proof Coin became unavailable by 12:07 p.m.  We are pleased with the initial demand, but are also in the process of evaluating the various customer concerns and system constraints and/or failures we experienced.  

We want to assure you that the United States Mint remains committed to providing the highest possible level of customer service, and regret any inconvenience or frustration this buying experience caused."

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jerry

i received a text that the silver AE proof was going back on sale at 12 today, as others have (judging by the site crashing again). It shows it not available at 12:01.

HugoRoss

Haaaaaaaa !!! Thank You President Trump !

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Big T

was that today?

HugoRoss

no thats USM confirmation – being shipped !

domenic

My order still shows processing….irritating.

sam tweedy

I can hardly wait for the NEXT FIASCO on NOV 17 and Nov 19…RUN FORREST RUN!!! FAR FAR AWAY…YIKES!!!!!

Charles Neon

I would like to know why the mint sold so many coins to people on eBay and yes prices were 400 to 1000 each. It’s bad enough to deal with the virus but when you get screwed over by the US Mint, it makes me want to give up coin collecting !!!!!

Seth Riesling

Lol. It will be the U.S. Mint “roulette wheel” gambling/sweepstakes website ordering debacle once again!
The U.S. Mint’s new motto is, “Just try to purchase one of our limited edition coins/medals & experience the excitement & fun of the 5th level of HELL!”

NumisdudeTX

sam tweedy

Hell might not freeze over but the U S MINT will surely make it seem that way for all of us REAL coin collectors!!! Lol

Mike Hunt

Sam — You won’t be getting any “competition” from me regarding Medals. I decided long ago that I only want items from the Mint that are real coinage. Medals don’t do it for me. I wish you the best if you decide to go after them. — MH

Coinbread

All those lucky enough to get their order on the gold v75 Privy should feel lucky indeed. People selling the coin ungraded on eBay are doing the correct thing too. Don’t bother to send to PCGS or NGC the Proof 70 grades are reserved for the coin dealers that support the grading companies. The dealers were really pissed that the Mint cut them out of this deal. Even though a lot of collectors miss out on these coins, at least more individuals got the coins than dealers. But the dealers and grading companies know the game and this will probably… Read more »

Last edited 8 days ago by Coinbread
Dirk G

I see people on eBay selling these coins in unopened USM packaging. That seems a little risky to me. The seller can’t 100% verify what’s in the packaging or the condition. And it seems like a dishonest buyer could claim that they did not receive the stated item or condition. Maybe I’m just a pessimist.