Second Round of 2018 American Innovation $1 Coin Designs Reviewed

by Mike Unser on September 28, 2018 · 6 comments

Another round of possible designs for the 2018 American Innovation $1 Coin was unveiled this month by the United States Mint. The dollar will introduce a 15-year series of coins honoring innovation in the United States.

Recommended design candidates for the 2018 American Innovation $1 Coin

The above images show CFA and CCAC recommendations for the 2018 American Innovation $1 Coin. The final designs will be pared down to two choices – one for the obverse (heads side) and one of the reverse (tails side)

The latest batch of design candidates was review by the Commission of Fine Arts (CFA) on Sept. 20 and by the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (CCAC) on Sept. 27.

Both bodies offered their recommendations, contrasting against the first series of designs looked over by the CCAC in late July. The pair of panels liked the same design for the obverse but had different recommendations for the reverse.

CCAC Selections

The CCAC selected obverse #8 and reverse #8, which are shown side-by-side below. In suggested changes, members passed a motion recommending tweaks to the placement of the obverse’s inscriptions.

CCAC Recommended designs for the 2018 American Innovation $1 Coin

CCAC recommended designs for the 2018 dollar

Committee members also tossed around ideas for series coins to share a privy mark — something that was similar, but smaller, than the shielded patent office symbol shown on reverse design #8, or perhaps a depiction of a gear or gears to convey innovation. The discussion ended from a lack of consensus.

CFA Selections

The CFA also approved of obverse design #8. They liked #12 as well. For the reverse, members preferred design #13. Images of these three designs follow.

CFA Recommended designs for the 2018 American Innovation $1 Coin

CFA choices for the 2018 dollar design

Below are U.S. Mint images and descriptions of the second round of proposed 2018 American Innovation $1 Coin designs.

Obverse Design Candidate Images and Descriptions

The obverse designs feature images of the Statue of Liberty. The common obverse design for this program, per Public Law 115-197, must feature "a likeness of the Statue of Liberty extending to the rim of the coin and large enough to provide a dramatic representation of Liberty," as well as the inscriptions "$1" and "In God We Trust."

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-O-01

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-O-01

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-O-02

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-O-02

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-O-03

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-O-03

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-O-04

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-O-04

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-O-05

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-O-05

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-O-06

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-O-06

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-O-07

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-O-07

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-O-08

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-O-08

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-O-09

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-O-09

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-O-10

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-O-10

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-O-11

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-O-11

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-O-12

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-O-12

Reverse Design Candidates

The legislation requires that the reverse of the 2018 American Innovation $1 Coin feature the inscriptions "United States of America" and "American Innovators" and a representation of the signature of George Washington on the first United States patent issued.

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-01

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-01

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-02

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-02

2018-AI-R-01 depicts George Washington’s signature on the first patent along with the inscriptions "American Innovators" and "United States of America." The design also features a quill and inkwell, symbolizing the signing of the patent, and a rising sun, symbolizing the dawning of a new era of progress with the many great innovations coming from America.

2018-AI-R-02 features George Washington’s signature above the inscription "Issued First U.S. Patent." The design also features Thomas Edison’s lightbulb as an iconic symbol of the inventions of American Innovators as well as the illumination of innovative ideas. The additional inscriptions are "American Innovators" and "United States of America."

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-03

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-03

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-04

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-04

2018-AI-R-03 depicts George Washington’s signature and the inscriptions "United States of America" and "American Innovators." The design also features an image of the 15-star flag that was in use during the early years of the Patent Office.

2018-AI-R-04 depicts George Washington’s signature above the inscription "Signed First Patent." Additional inscriptions include "American Innovators," "1790," and "United States of America". The design also features an image of the Patent Office relief found on the Herbert C. Hoover Building in Washington, D.C, the headquarters of the Department of Commerce and once the home of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-05

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-05

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-06

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-06

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-07

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-07

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-08

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-08

2018-AI-R-05, 2018 AI-R-06, 2018-AI-R-07 and 2018-AI-R-08 feature George Washington’s signature and the inscriptions "American Innovators" and "United States of America." The stylized gears represent industry and innovation. Design 07 features the inscription "1790 First Patent Signed By" above Washington’s signature. Designs 05 and 08 include the inscription "Signed First Patent" under Washington’s signature, with Design 05 also featuring the inscription "1790".

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-09

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-09

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-10

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-10

2018-AI-R-09 features George Washington’s signature on the first patent, as if inscribed on a piece of paper, and the inscriptions "American Innovators" and "United States of America." The cowboy hat has come to symbolize an independent spirit and resilient nature. The design also features the American created C computer programming language, shown here as a code to display the words "United States of America." Finally, the Phillips head screw, another American invention, is featured on the border.

2018-AI-R-10 features George Washington’s signature and the inscriptions "American Innovators" and "United States of America." The design also features a cowboy hat and astronaut, depicted as if on separate piece of paper, but also placed to suggest the astronaut is wearing the hat, a playful combination of two American icons to create a uniquely American figure. The Phillips head screw, another American invention, is featured on the border.

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-11

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-11

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-12

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-12

2018-AI-R-11 features George Washington’s signature on the first patent as well as a hand holding a quill, representing the moment of signing. Above the signature is potash and the fertilizer it was transformed into by the process invented by Samuel Hopkins for which the first patent was granted. Finally, the design features the inscriptions "United States of America," "First Patent," and "American Innovators."

2018-AI-R-12 features an artist’s conception of the first patent that was issued on July 31st, 1790. President George Washington, whose signature is boldly depicted below, has just signed the document as noted by the quill pen. The design also features the inscriptions "United States of America," "American Innovators," and "First U.S. Patent – July 31, 1790."

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-13

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-13

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-14

American Innovation $1 Coin Design Candidate 2018-AI-R-14

2018-AI-R-13 depicts a document representing the first U.S. patent issued, featuring a bold depiction of George Washington’s signature. The 13 stars along the rim represent the 13 states in existence in 1790. The design also features the inscriptions "First Patent of the United States of America," "July 31, 1790," and "American Innovators."

2018-AI-R-14 depicts George Washington’s signature under a man stirring a pot. This represents the first U.S. patent, which advanced changes in the production of potash and pearl ash, considered the first industrial chemical. The design also features the inscriptions "American Innovators," "First U.S. Patent Grant," "1790," and "United States of America."

Coin Edges

Dollar coin edges are incused with the year of issue, a mint mark, and the inscription "E Pluribus Unum."

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Chuck
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Chuck

I was just wondering. Where is the date & mint mark? Oh yeah, its another crappy coin with the date & and mint mark on the edge!! I gave the presidentail dollars a rating of 50% without the date & mint mark, but I still bought them. After they moved the date & mint mark on the sacagawea dollar I gave it a rating of 60%, but I still bought them. The new inovation dollars with no images, only thoughts & ideas as well as no date & mintmark, I’ll rate them at 25%, however I will not be purchasing them. Congress has to get a grip on reality and call these coins what they are — commemorative coins!! What congress needs to do right now is stop production of the cent and only put them in coin set products. How about it congress? Stop wasting the tax payers money… Read more »

Munzen
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Munzen

The UK’s thinking about discontinuing its 1p and 2p coins but so far they’re still in circulation. Several Eurozone countries no longer require 1- and 2-cent coins but still accept those that “leak” in from other member states. Australia’s gone full-bore and eliminated both its 1¢ and 5¢ coins a number of years ago. Unfortunately neither we nor Canada can easily eliminate their 5¢ coins because we both use 25¢ pieces instead of 20¢ coins; in the absence of a 5¢ coin, making change would be very cumbersome because it would require a large number of dimes. The cynic in me expects that my great-grandchildren will still be using 1-cent coins because of both the level of politics involved and the resistance of so many people to doing anything new or different, even if it saves all sorts of bucks. Heck, we’re also the only country that still primarily uses… Read more »

Munzen
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Munzen

Correction: I should have said that New Zealand eliminated its 5¢ coins, not Australia (it’s been a while since I visited down under). Oz still has 5¢ coins, but both it and NZ dropped their 1¢ and 2¢ coins years ago.

tom thumb
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tom thumb

what a waste, bought the presidential dollars just to complete the series, but won’t be buying these.

Lee
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I would love to see a series of replica dollars from the past like a short set of flowing hair gold dollars and capped bust and seated liberty and Morgans and peace dollars

Vachon
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Vachon

The “In God We Trust” motto is obnoxiously large on some of those design candidates. Almost if they want to make extra sure there isn’t a repeat of that manufactured “Godless dollars” debacle.

One of these days, Congress will bite the bullet and dollar bills will be discontinued and dollar coins will flood the marketplace but with all these unlikely-to-be-seen designs, I wonder how the public will handle the coins when someone tries to spend them?