Senate Passes Boys Town Centennial Commemorative Coin Act

by Mike Unser on March 27, 2015 · 0 comments

Boys Town Mission

An image on the Boys Town website that summarizes its mission and features its iconic statue

On Wednesday, March 25, the U.S. Senate unanimously passed the Boys Town Centennial Commemorative Coin Act.

Numbered S.301 and introduced by Nebraska Senator Deb Fischer on Jan. 29, 2015, the bill seeks $5 gold coins, $1 silver coins, and half-dollar clad coins to celebrate the Boys Town’s 100th anniversary.

"I’m thrilled to announce the passage of my legislation commemorating the 100th anniversary of Boys Town — a truly remarkable organization that has rescued countless young men and women from harmful experiences," said Sen. Fischer. The Act is "a wonderful way to pay tribute to an extraordinary organization."

Founded on Dec. 12, 1917 by Father Edward Flanagan, Boys Town (www.boystown.org) serves underprivileged and at-risk children. The organization’s headquarters are near Omaha, Nebraska in the village of Boys Town. Every year, the organization serves more than 2 million children and families across the country.

"Nebraska is proud to be home to this life-changing nonprofit and I’m pleased to see this legislation move forward," Fischer added.

Legislation with the same purpose passed in the House and Senate late last year but Congress left town before sending it to the President’s desk. A similar bill, H.R.893, was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives on Jan. 11, 2015. It is currently before the House Committee on Financial Services.

If either bill becomes law, the United States Mint in 2017 would produce and sell up to 50,000 $5 gold coins, 350,000 silver dollars, and 300,000 clad half-dollars with designs that are emblematic of the 100 years of Boys Town. These commemorative coins would feature collector finishes of proof and uncirculated.

Both bills include surcharges for coin sales with collected funds directed "to carry out Boys Town’s cause of caring for and assisting children and families in underserved communities across America."

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