Everglades Set, $1 Coin and Currency Set and Popular News

by Rhonda Kay on November 16, 2014 · 3 comments

This week looks to be slower in world mint releases, but the United States Mint will introduce two products. First, on Tuesday, is the Everglades National Park Quarters Three-Coin Set for $9.95. It is the fifth and last of the series for this year.

Everglades Quarters Three-Coin Set, Native American $1 Coin and Currency Set

Everglades Quarters Three-Coin Set and Native American $1 Coin and Currency Set

On Thursday comes the Native American $1 Coin and Currency Set for $13.95. This is an entirely new product, and a joint offering from the U.S. Mint and the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. It holds an uncirculated 2014-D Native American $1 Coin and a 2013 $1 note.

"The set has interesting historical information about the Lewis and Clark Expedition and a sleeve to cover the folder," describes the U.S. Mint in a news release.

We’ll talk about these releases as well as a couple of world mint products. Until then, here are last week’s five most read:

  1. 2014 Royal Canadian Mint Holiday-Themed Coins – New coins from the Royal Canadian Mint celebrate the holiday season with festive designs to include Christmas trees, ornaments, poinsettias and joyful family activities. Unique for collections or ideal as gifts, the Royal Canadian Mint is currently featuring seven different holiday-themed products.

  2. Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Centennial Coins in Gold and Silver – Issued by the Royal Canadian Mint, gold and silver coins in larger than typical format commemorate the 100th anniversary of the completion of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway. Both coins share a reverse design emblematic of the historic and important nature of the railway to the development of the nation, and both are available in extremely limited mintages

  3. US Mint to Resume Bullion Silver Eagle Sales on Nov. 17 – The United States Mint expects to have over one million 2014 American Silver Eagle bullion coins for sale by Nov. 17, according to a memo the agency sent to its authorized distributors. Since the U.S. Mint cannot produce enough Silver Eagles, the Mint sold out of them after weeks of explosive demand, sales of the 99.9% pure silver coins will resume on a rationed basis.

  4. 2014 50th Anniversary Kennedy 50c Order Limits End Nov. 17 – Effective Monday, Nov. 17, 2014, at 12:01 AM, the United States Mint is lifting household order limits on the 2014 50th Anniversary Kennedy Half-Dollar Silver Coin Collection and the 2014 50th Anniversary Kennedy Half-Dollar Uncirculated Coin Set. Both products should get a bit of a sales boost without the ordering limits with businesses able to get more to market and sell.

  5. 2014 Christmas Coin Includes ‘Augmented Reality’ for Smartphones – This year’s Christmas-themed coin from the Perth Mint of Australia celebrates the story of Santa Claus and his reindeer. Struck in one-half ounce of 99.9% pure silver, the reverse of the 2014 50c Christmas Silver Proof Coin features a silhouette of Santa Claus and his sleigh led by Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.

{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

Boz November 17, 2014 at 10:45 am

A worthless coin that merchants will not accept, plus a crisp dollar bill. All for $14 plus five bucks for shipping. Call this dumb and dumber, but who knows it may sell bigtime as Grannie and Grampaw stocking stuffers. The jury is way out there on this one.

dinnis November 17, 2014 at 10:53 am

I believe I read either on coin packet or ad that these 3 coin ATB sets at 9.95 contain 1st day or early strikes.
When I look at coins in packets I do not see any difference. Some of the coins look near perfect but some have scratches and blemishes. As far as strike goes, I don’t see any difference in detail.
I looked at one set by taking them out of packaging and with German magnifying glass, I did not see any differences from coins manufactured by the tens of thousands and put in Mint wrappers or bags.
Can anyone tell me the advantage of these 9.95 3-coin sets other than the nice color photos and nice packaging?.
I often buy several ATBs looking for a difference in strike but never see any.
Can someone fill me in on this. These writers tell us coin collecting is still for everyone but I do not buy that and as far as these ATB quarters go, they near all look the same. I guess it is not so much what constitutes and exceptional strike in showing perfect detail, but the exceptional ones are probably ones that would not have good detail. On some Gettysburg coins, I can read the writing (unit number) on plaque on statue and some coins are better, but on the whole there is no variety, just uniformity , same as the 10th Mountain Division patches on the BDUs that I wore for many years, just the same dull patches- no differences in stitching lettering, etc. America represents boring uniformity.

Boz November 17, 2014 at 11:45 am

Dinnis the only thing I can say is for most people you will never get them without buying from the mint. These are the cheaper products especially for the s coin. While the D and P might show up in circulation eventually, so far most since 2010 are still in the vaults and have not been issued in great quantity. The three coin set or the circulating set from the mint make sense for kids wanting to fill holes in an album. Very little since 2006 shows up at the laundrymat coin changer and what does are dirty, burnt, or badly scratched or dinged.

ButI think you are right that there is very little quality difference between the mint sets and the general supply that someday will be shipped to banks from the federal reserve hoard.

Leave a Comment