2012 Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Australian Gold Coin Nears Sell Out

by CoinNews.net on January 12, 2012 · 5 comments

The Perth Mint of Australia on Thursday warned its customers that its 2012 Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Australian Gold Coin is nearing a sellout. From an already extremely limited mintage of 1,000, just 60 remain.

2012 Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Australian Gold Coin

2012 Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Australian Gold Coin

Released on January 3, 2012, the 99.99% fine proof gold coin honors the Queen’s 60 years of reign, having ascended to the throne on February 6, 1952 with her coronation at the age of 27 as Queen Elizabeth II on June 2, 1953. The only other British monarch to celebrate a Diamond Jubilee was Queen Victoria in 1897, the Queen’s great-great grandmother.

The Australian gold coin features two portraits. The obverse depicts the Ian Rank-Broadley effigy of her majesty with included inscriptions ELIZABETH II, AUSTRALIA, 2012 and 25 DOLLARS.

The reverse depicts the original Mary Gillick uncrowned effigy of her majesty with the inscriptions QUEEN ELIZABETH II, DIAMOND JUBILEE, 1/4oz 9999 GOLD and the Perth Mint ‘P’ mint mark.

The Perth Mint is currently offering the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Australian Gold Coin for AUS $717.27 (~US $738.65) via its online site at www.perthmint.com.au. The gold coin will ship within a display case with an illustrated shipper and a Numbered Certificate of Authenticity.

Specifications for 2012 Diamond Jubilee Gold Coin

Size (oz) 1/4
Gold Content (Troy oz) 0.25
Denomination (AUD) $25
Fineness (%) 99.99
Gross Weight (g) 7.777
Diameter (mm) 20.60
Thickness (mm) 2.00

 

See other Perth Mint coin highlights from this site’s Australian Coin Guide.

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The Perth Mint Australia

About the Perth Mint of Australia

The Perth Mint is wholly-owned by the State Government of Western Australia and is the official issuer of the Australian Federal Government’s Gold and Silver Bullion Coin Program. They are also responsible for striking some of the most unique numismatic coins available in the world.

The Perth was actually opened as a branch of the British Royal Mint in 1899. Its initial purpose was to refine the gold from nearby deposits in order to mint sovereigns for the British colony. Ownership was transferred to the Western Australia state government in 1970.

{ 5 comments… read them below or add one }

Frankly Speaking January 12, 2012 at 11:53 pm

Have noticed the recycling of earlier effigies of late, such as 100 years of Australian coinage recently (which could be confused with 100 years of monarchy if just based on the use of the monarchs’ effigies alone without the letterings to clarify) and now this, the jubilee. Is this just plain lazy?

Also, Victoria’s jubilee was 1887, not 1897.

blah January 13, 2012 at 4:08 pm

Yes… I don’t understand what is supposed to be appealing or special about imagery of a monarch that we’ve seen a thousand times already on other coins.

Brucehassan March 26, 2012 at 8:01 pm

Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee was in 1887, and her Diamond Jubilee in 1897, so the dates are correct. The use of standard images of the monarch reinforces the ideas of continuity and longevity that are inherent in any commemoration of a long-time event. I do think that the design could have been a little more imaginative, and as an Australian coin made a better visual connection between the the concepts of Queen of Australia and her Australian realm (I think the 1977 silver jubilee 50c coin is still the best example of this type of design that also responds to the shape of the coin).

Lawrence Chard - Chard Coins June 1, 2012 at 9:57 am

Queen Victoria had not one, but two, major jubilees, a Golden Jubilee in 1887, and a Diamond Jubilee in 1897.
Of the two, the diamond jubilee, being a much rarer event, received more numismatic interest, including some fabulous medals. The most commonly seen of these featured young and mature portraits, as does this Australian coin.
We have photos of them here:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lawrence_chard/6862977874/
and
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lawrence_chard/7009093521/
We think they are classic designs which have stood the test of time very well.

Rose Calleja February 24, 2015 at 6:08 am

So i happened to find of these coins in great condition that was mistaken for a $2 coin however it does not have 1/4 ounce 9999. Stamped on it? Does this mean its not real????

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