US Mint Removes Order Limits on Mount Hood Silver Uncirculated Coin

by Rhonda Kay on September 9, 2011 · 2 comments

2010-P Mount Hood 5 Ounce Silver Uncirculated CoinThe collector five ounce silver uncirculated coin honoring Mount Hood National Forest went on sale July 28, 2011 with an order limit of one per household. The United States Mint pulled the limit this week, giving buyers an opportunity to order as many as they want.

Still priced at $279.95, the Mount Hood silver uncirculated coin is not available in unlimited quantities, however. With a 27,000 mintage limit and 20,994 of those already purchased as of September 5, less than 6,000 now remain.

The Mount Hood coin for the state of Oregon is the final 2010-dated issue. The previous four issues within the same America the Beautiful Five Ounce Uncirculated Coin series sold out earlier this year. Those United States Mint coins in the order of their release honored the national parks of Hot Springs (AR), Yellowstone (WY), Yosemite (CA), and Grand Canyon (AZ).

The first two uncirculated coins each sold out in two weeks but the sales pace slowed for the third, fourth and now fifth issue. Mount Hood’s order limit removal should quickly spark several hundred to a few thousand in sales based on the 2,000+ that moved within a week after the limits were yanked on Grand Canyon.

Upcoming Issues: Same Price, Higher Mintage and Order Limits

Interestingly, based on the product page for the September 22 release of the next five ounce silver uncirculated coin which celebrates Gettysburg National Military Park (PA), the Mint plans to increase the per household order limits (from one to five) and the coin’s mintage limits (from 27,000 to 35,000). The price is expected to be the same $279.95.

The United States Mint has not scheduled the releases of the other four 2011-dated coins honoring Glacier National Park (MT), Olympic National Park (WA), Vicksburg National Military Park (MS) and the Chickasaw National Recreational Area (OK).

Types of America the Beautiful coins

America the Beautiful coins celebrate one specific national park or area located within the 50 U.S. states, DC, and the five U.S. territories. There will be 56 designs in total featured between 2010 and 2021. Each new design will be shown on the reverse of:

  • a circulating American quarter produced for commerce (there are also three quarters produced for coin collectors in proof clad, uncirculated clad and proof silver),
  • a collector five ounce piece, as in the case of the Mount Hood silver uncirculated coin, and
  • an investment-grade five ounce silver bullion coin

The bullion versions, intended for investors, have the same 3.0 inch diameter, .999 fine silver purity and five-ounce weight as the collector coins. Aside from their different finishes — the bullion coins are brilliant while the uncirculated coins have a matte finish, the major distinction between the two types comes down to a mint mark. The bullion coins do not have one while each of the collector uncirculated pieces bear a "P" mint mark on their obverse to denote their production in Philadelphia. The United States Mint has already released each of the 2010 and 2011-dated bullion coins. The first seven sold out. The final three remain available.

All America the Beautiful coins feature the familiar portrait of George Washington on their obverse.

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

floyd September 12, 2011 at 12:47 pm

No thanks on the Gettysburg. or any more for that matter.

The mint’s greed has ruined this series for me.
Paying $57/oz for a silver that is $40/oz. I’ll be selling my 2010’s
and buying the bullion version only. The bullion version is more attractive anyway.

Brian V. September 12, 2011 at 7:44 pm

I bought the Hot Springs and was a little ticked to find the dealer varieties selling on e-bay for less than the $279.95 (+ S/H)…I liked the challenge of getting one of the first, but should have waited out the market to see where they settled in cost. I now look at it as a long-term, hope to get the $$$ back down the road. But honestly, all of the mint special products secondary markets are fickle. Look at the 1999 silver mint set half the cost from 2 years ago. 2001 Buffalo silver commem has dropped also in past few years. It seems the “gotta have” items can drop with time if you’re patient enuff.

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