Numismatic News: Gold Vending Machines, Affordable Barbers, Missing Mintmarks

by on June 18, 2009 · 0 comments

June 18: Four numismatic news or coin blog articles are referenced on CoinNews every Tuesday and Thursday. These articles are not authored by us, but we recommend coin collectors read them for their unusual or interesting content. Here are today’s coin articles:

German developing gold vending machine
Rachel Nolan | Associated Press

It’s a novel twist on the vending machine: in go the coins, out comes a nugget of gold. TG-Gold-Super-Markt, a company based in Reutlingen, southwestern Germany, is developing a machine to dispense pieces of gold as small as one gram in ornamental boxes for about euro 30 ($42). CEO Thomas Geissler said Thursday that he will deliver the first machines to sites in Germany in three months. He has talked to potential buyers in Asia, the Middle East, Britain and the U.S…

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Affordable Barbers
Tom LaMarre | Coins Magazine

A recent column mentioned some inexpensive Barber dimes and their stories. Here are some more examples for your collection. One of them is the 1892 dime, valued at $5 in Good-4. It was the first Barber dime and was not exactly a hit. "The new coins out from the mint this year have run against various objections based on aesthetic grounds, especially the dime,” the March 24, 1892, issue of the Olean Democrat said….

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Coin Monday: Mysterious Missing Mintmarks
John Dale | Heritage Blog

The mintmark is a simple concept nearly as old as coinage itself: it is a small letter or symbol that signifies where a coin was struck. The official U.S. Mint Web site has an excellent summary of the mintmark as that agency uses it today; now, as in the past, a mintmark can be used to trace a defective coin back to its source. Since the mintmark is itself part of the coin, though, it is not immune to its own class of errors…

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Collecting Strategies for Classic Commemoratives
Pinnacle Rarities

Between 1892 and 1954, there were 50 different silver commemoratives authorized by Congress: 48 Half Dollars along with a single Quarter and Dollar. Because many of these were issued for multiple years, were struck at the Philadelphia, Denver and San Francisco Mints, and were issued with subtle design variations, there are a total of 144 different silver coins that constitute the Classic Silver Commemorative category…

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